Tag Archives: early modern

SEMINAR: Robbie Richardson (Princeton), “The Souls of Departed Utensils”: Death and Indigenous Material Culture in Eighteenth Century Britain

Please join us for CEMS ANU Seminar Two presented by Robbie Richardson, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Princeton University, who will speak on

The Souls of Departed Utensils”: Death and Indigenous Material Culture in Eighteenth Century Britain.
Register to attend: Eventbrite

If you are unable to attend the live event, please register to receive a notification for the recording afterwards.

TIME/DATE: 19:00, Wednesday, 27 October (NYC); 10:00 Thursday, 28 October (Canberra/Sydney)

Our Inaugural Seminar, What is Early Modern History?, with Professor Merry Wiesner-Hanks, is now available to view online at our YouTube channel. The Centre for Early Modern Studies, Australian National University, brings together researchers and HDRs from the disciplines of history, literary studies, art and design, theatre and performance history, languages, linguistics, music, and the digital humanities who study the long early modern period (1450-1800). Sign up for our newsletter, follow us on Twitter @AnuCems, or see our website to read about current projects and future events.

ANZAMEMS DEVELOPMENT SCHEME (ADS) 2021

Dear ANZAMEMS ECRs and HDR Students,

I’m writing to provide an update on the ANZAMEMS DEVELOPMENT SCHEME (ADS), our forthcoming workshop series for HDR students and ECRs. Since our last communication with the ANZAMEMS membership, we have finalised the seminar schedule and topics (see below). We have 27 members enrolled in the workshops, and we are very much looking forward to meeting them. For any HDRs and ECRs who missed the first call, we invite them to apply to join the scheme.

Should you wish to apply to join this seminar series, please email Clare Monagle clare.monagle@mq.edu.au by October 24th to register your interest, supplying the information below. Participation is only open to ANZAMEMS members.

1. Name
2. Brief Bio (100 Words)
3. Reason for Interest (100 Words)

Many thanks,
The ADS organising committee (Matthew Champion, Nat Cutter, Clare Monagle, Megan Shaw)

Session Topics and Schedule
(All times given in Australian Eastern Standard Time)

Session 1
ECR Careers in Australia
Convener – Clare Monagle
October 28th, 3-5pm

Session 2
ECR Careers in North America
Convener – Clare Monagle
November 5th, 9-11am

Session 3
ECR Careers in Europe and the United Kingdom
Convener – Clare Monagle
November 9th, 12-2pm

Session 4
Methodology 1 – Planning Interdisciplinary Projects
Conveners – Nat Cutter and Megan Shaw
November 18th, 3-5pm

Session 5
Methodology 2 – Research from Afar
Conveners – Nat Cutter and Megan Shaw
November 24th, 9-11am


Session 6
Critical Issues in Medieval and Early Modern Studies – Globality
Conveners – Matthew Champion and Helen Young
December 1st, 9-11am

Session 7
Critical Issues in Medieval and Early Modern Studies – Materiality
Conveners – Matthew Champion and Helen Young
December 9th, 1-3pm

CFP Macbeth in European Culture

Macbeth in European Culture, International Symposium
University of Murcia (Spain)
22-24th March, 2022

Despite its Scottish-Anglo setting and its close relationship to the politics of the Stuart regency, Macbeth has proven one of Shakespeare’s most suggestive plays for practitioners and artists working far beyond its original Anglophone context. The play’s potential for violence, its exploration of hierarchy and power, its conflicting gender dynamics and its supernatural dimensions are just some of the elements that have been appropriated on stages around Europe. They have also prompted the transformation of the play into different shapes, formats and media, and so this symposium intends to inspect the multiple afterlives of Macbeth beyond its initial historical and cultural resonances. We are looking for innovative work that approaches the play from regional, national, continental and intercontinental angles as we try to chart Macbeth’s reception in or in relation to Europe from the seventeenth century to the present. Among other possibilities, we invite discussions concerning the relocation of the play’s ideological, gender/sexuality, regional/ethnic/racial/religious boundaries within specific historical and theoretical contexts. Contributions on any of the following are welcome:

— Macbeth in European theatrical, operatic, cinematic, televisual or online performance;
— Different European versions (adaptations, rewritings, appropriations, updates) of Macbeth;
— Translations of Macbeth into non-Anglophone European languages: the importance and impact of those translations in their target cultures and in intercultural contexts;
— Reception of Anglophone Macbeth in non-Anglophone contexts, or the reception of non-Anglophone Macbeth in Anglophone contexts;
— Traveling Macbeth: international tours of the play, intercultural performances of the play;
— Macbeth in European visual cultures: from illustration to audiovisual art;
— Macbeth in European digital cultures;
— Theoretical reflections on Macbeth as a case study of ‘European Shakespeare’ and or versus ‘global Shakespeare’.

We particularly favor contributions which relate interventions (artistic or otherwise) to broader regional, national, transnational, continental or intercontintental concerns and to the history of Shakespeare’s reception in these contexts. A 250-300 word abstract and a brief bio should be sent to Juan F. Cerdá (juanfcerda@um.es) and Paul Prescott (pprescott@ucmerced.edu) by December 3rd, 2021.

The symposium will be held at the La Merced Campus of the University of Murcia (Spain), yet online participation will be available for those facing traveling restrictions.

Call for contributions: Daphnis, German culture of the early modern period

Coffee and Tobacco – ignitors of sociability?

The last Daphnis issue focuses on the sociability discourse in early modern Leipzig. This includes social practices like singing student and drinking songs like the ‘Dunkelmännerlied’ or eating goose at Martin’s Eve. This issue clearly makes an important contribution to the cultural history of the early modern period and is hence worth reading.

For further information please see: Formen der Geselligkeit und ihr historischer Wandel als Herausforderung der frühneuzeitlichen Kulturgeschichte.

CFP: International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds

International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds: Britain’s Border Geographies

University of Leeds 4-7 July 2022

This series of three panels is sponsored by the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol, and the Medieval and Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney.

The aim of these panels is to explore aspects of identity formation in the multicultural border zones of medieval Britain, including England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, the North Atlantic coast and the English Channel linking Britain to France and the Low Countries. A wide range of critical approaches is encouraged, including, but not limited to, eco-criticism, cultural geography, gender theory, book history, historiography, literary criticism, linguistics, postcolonial theory.

We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers from all disciplines. Proposals from postgraduates and early-career scholars are particularly welcome.

Abstracts of up to 100 words can be sent to: Helen Fulton (helen.fulton@bristol.ac.uk) or Jan Shaw (jan.shaw@sydney.edu.au) by Friday 10 September 2021. Please include your name and full contact details, including institutional address, and any AV equipment you are likely to need.

For more information please see: