Medieval and Early Modern Centre: Editing in Australia

ATTENTION ALL EDITORS OF TEXTS

Professor Paul Eggert has recently published an article on Editing in Australia (see article), showing the breadth and depth since the nineteenth century of scholarly textual editing in this country. As Paul says, his article focuses mainly on the editing of texts in English, although at the same time he mentions in passing some non-English texts. Working in the area of European languages (Italian, French, Latin), we the undersigned, in consultation with Paul, think that it would be appropriate to write a companion piece focusing on the editing in Australia of texts in non-English European languages in order to underline the contribution to this scholarly field made by scholars working in these areas. This of course raises the question of Australian editing of texts in Asian and other non-European languages, but this might merit another article by scholars working in those areas.

We are circulating this letter in the hope of finding those who are involved in text editing or who might know others who are similarly involved (both critical and scholarly editions, including unpublished theses). We would be grateful if you could provide us with details of your work for our article and pass on this letter to others who might be interested. Regarding the work of scholars no longer with us, we would be glad if you could list them for us, as well as details of their work.

Frances.Muecke@sydney.edu.au
Nerida Newbigin
Margaret Sankey

2022 ANZAMEMS Conference Registration!

This is just a reminder that registration for the 2022 ANZAMEMS Conference on Reception and Emotion is open! Registration will close on 24 June.

To register, please visit our conference website and click the big red ‘Register for the Conference’ button!

Please note, if you’re an ANZAMEMS member for 2022, you’re entitled to pay the discounted ANZAMEMS members’ rate. If you haven’t paid your 2022 membership fees, you can do so online here. If you’re unsure if you’ve paid for 2022, please contact us at info@anzamems.org.

Medieval and Early Modern Centre April Newsletter

Medieval and Early Modern Centre, April 2022 Newsletter


April is a quieter month for events: Easter, mid-semester break, and Anzac Day land squarely in its middle and – hopefully – give us all some much-needed respite.

This month’s MEMC lunchtime seminar – on Friday 29 April – is a double-bill. We will have the opportunity to hear shorter papers (about 20 minutes each) from two of the Centre’s Honorary Associates, Andrew Mellas and Penny Nash. As you can see in the abstracts below, the presentations bring us into the material, sensory, and emotional worlds of the European middle ages, taking us from Byzantine liturgy through Carolingian, Ottonian, and Salian dress and costume.

We look forward to seeing you on Zoom at the end of the month. Meanwhile, enjoy the upcoming break,
John Gagné, Director

Events
MEMC Lunchtime Seminar

Friday 29 April
12:00 noon – 1:30 pm

Andrew Mellas (MEMC, Sydney), and Penny Nash (MEMC, Sydney)

(1) Andrew Mellas, “Romanos the Melodist and the Liturgical Emotions of Pascha”

The hymnos of Romanos the Melodist sought to shape an emotional and liturgical community in Constantinople. Retelling the sacred stories of Scripture, they become affective scripts for the faithful, teaching them to yearn for compunction, weep with grief and dance for joy. Emotions formed part of the desire for and experience of the salvific mystery in Byzantium. However, they were transformed together with the whole of human nature in this mystical experience.

This paper will explore one of Romanos’ paschal songs, On the Resurrection VI, which invited the faithful to experience the dialectic between the beginning of salvation history and the end of all things, weaving together the fallenness of the congregation with the promise of rebirth. While this paper will also allude to other hymns composed for Pascha, it will consider how the tears of Romanos’ protagonist, Mary Magdalen – who was conquered by weeping but overcome by the fire of love – embodied a metamorphosis of grief into joy. In the liminal space between the absence and presence of Christ’s body, during the interlude between crucifixion and resurrection, Romanos’ song elicited a longing for the eschaton that is yet to come but already dawning.

See below for Zoom link

(2) Penny Nash, “Pointy Hats, Glittering Headdresses and Audacious Demeanour as Symbols of Power and Sovereignty”

The examination of clothing, jewellery, gifts, and other material objects, together with the deportment of the giver and the receiver of such items, especially in how they are visually presented, is crucial in understanding the intentions of the participants.

The paper deals with the symbolism of the posture and clothing, especially headgear, in a number of depictions of historical figures. Examined are Pepin’s and Charlemagne’s pointy hats; Theophanu’s gifts to the West from Byzantium; the bareheaded portrait of Henry, dux of Bavaria (‘the Wrangler’); and Countess Matilda’s possible claim to royality in her manuscript portrait with the Germanic king Henry IV and Abbot Hugh of Cluny at Canossa – among other images.

This paper puts into historical perspective selected artworks created between the eighth and early-twelfth centuries in Western Europe (the Carolingian, Ottonian, and Salian periods). It demonstrates how important representations can be in depicting and nuancing our understanding of the tensions and concerns of the people involved and prefaces later portrayals in the Renaissance.

Join via Zoom (same link for both talks): https://uni-sydney.zoom.us/j/89068632840

ANU Seminar: “Patterns, Outliers, and Teasers: Reception of Early Modern Women’s Writing”

Centre for Early Modern Studies, ANU, Seminar 1, 2022: On-line, April 26, 6pm.
“Patterns, Outliers, and Teasers: Reception of Early Modern Women’s Writing”

Please join us to hear Marie-Louise Coolahan, Professor of English at the National University of Ireland Galway, present the ‘big-picture’ findings emerging from the European Research Council-funded project that she led: RECIRC: The Reception and Circulation of Early Modern Women’s Writing, 1550-1700 (https://recirc.nuigalway.ie), followed by a Q&A.

Date: Tuesday 26th April 9.00 am (IST) 6.00-7.15 pm (AEST).

Register here: Eventbrite registration link.

Book Launch – The Legacy of Gildas: Constructions of Authority in the Early Medieval West


Join us for the launch of Dr Stephen Joyce’s monograph The Legacy of Gildas: Constructions of Authority in the Early Medieval West!

About this event

The Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies is pleased to be hosting the launch of Dr Stephen Joyce’s monograph The Legacy of Gildas: Constructions of Authority in the Early Medieval West (Boydell, 2022), a ‘provocative new investigation into the shadowy figure of Gildas, his influence and representation’.

The launch will feature comments from Emeritus Prof. Constant Mews (Monash) and Dr Darius Von Güttner Sporzynski (University of Melbourne).

The book is available for purchase from the publisher here: https://boydellandbrewer.com/9781783276721/the-legacy-of-gildas/

The event is free and can be registered for here

2022 Aotearoa Gender History Network First Session

You are warmly invited to the first session of the 2022 Aotearoa Gender History Network!

Wednesday Rāapa 16 March, 12 pm – 1 pm NZT / 10 am – 11 am AEST, via zoom
Zoom link: https://waikato.zoom.us/j/97078105588

Speakers:

Amelia Barker
PhD Candidate, Massey University

Constance de Rabastens (d. c.1386): a woman who fought to be heard
Constance de Rabastens was a lay female visionary during the Great Western Schism (1378-1417), a period in which Western Christendom was divided between two rival papacies, and political and religious differences divided communities and even families. Unlike most female visionaries at the time, Constance’s visions supported the “wrong” pope for her region, and she was forbidden from recording her experiences. Despite this, she fought to be heard by religious authorities, challenging their decisions, and eventually disappearing after being arrested. Her recorded letters and visions reveal her agency in making her voice heard, providing historians with a clear example of how medieval women were not just silent witnesses of great political and religious turmoil in their communities, but actively engaged and desperate to influence those in power.

Amanda McVitty
Lecturer in History, Massey University

Sexual regulation and the evolution of patriarchal judicial culture: Towards a feminist history of the legal profession
In his now-classic study, Robert Moore stressed the pivotal role of lawyers in transforming premodern Europe into a ‘persecuting society’ that was heavily invested in surveilling and regulating moral and sexual ‘vice’. This new project centres lawyers’ gendered agency in this process, asking how and to what extent these men created and enabled a patriarchal judicial culture in which were born ‘sticky’ myths and stereotypes about sexual misconduct, rape and gendered violence, and about those who perpetrate it. Using feminist methods, I aim to transform the way we think about and teach this legal history across the premodern-modern divide.


Convenors: Charlotte Greenhalgh (charlotte.greenhalgh@waikato.ac.nz) and Charlotte Macdonald (charlotte.macdonald@vuw.ac.nz)

2022 Aotearoa Gender History Network

This is a regular, online seminar. Each session (held via zoom) features 2 x 10–12-minute research presentations on current research in Gender History with a focus on Aotearoa New Zealand, followed by discussion. Please be in touch if you would like to present your own research – we have speaking slots available on Wednesday Rāapa 7 September.

Wednesday Rāapa 16 March, 12 pm – 1 pm, via zoom
Zoom link: https://waikato.zoom.us/j/97078105588


Speakers:
Amelia Barker
PhD Candidate, Massey University

Constance de Rabastens (d. c.1386): a woman who fought to be heard
Constance de Rabastens was a lay female visionary during the Great Western Schism (1378-1417), a period in which Western Christendom was divided between two rival papacies, and political and religious differences divided communities and even families. Unlike most female visionaries at the time, Constance’s visions supported the “wrong” pope for her region, and she was forbidden from recording her experiences. Despite this, she fought to be heard by religious authorities, challenging their decisions, and eventually disappearing after being arrested. Her recorded letters and visions reveal her agency in making her voice heard, providing historians with a clear example of how medieval women were not just silent witnesses of great political and religious turmoil in their communities, but actively engaged and desperate to influence those in power.

Amanda McVitty
Lecturer in History, Massey University

Sexual regulation and the evolution of patriarchal judicial culture: Towards a feminist history of the legal profession
In his now-classic study, Robert Moore stressed the pivotal role of lawyers in transforming premodern Europe into a ‘persecuting society’ that was heavily invested in surveilling and regulating moral and sexual ‘vice’. This new project centres lawyers’ gendered agency in this process, asking how and to what extent these men created and enabled a patriarchal judicial culture in which were born ‘sticky’ myths and stereotypes about sexual misconduct, rape and gendered violence, and about those who perpetrate it. Using feminist methods, I aim to transform the way we think about and teach this legal history across the premodern-modern divide.

Coming up next:
Wednesday Rāapa 4 May, 12 pm – 1 pm, via zoom

Speakers:
Hayley Goldthorpe, Te Herenga Waka Victoria University of Wellington
The Three Graces against the Taranaki War, 1860-61

Rachel Caines, Australian Catholic University
Interrogating Gender through First World War Propaganda Posters


Macquarie University Research Fellowships 2022

Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia) will offer up to 10 full-time Research Fellowship positions commencing in 2023. Fellowships will be awarded on a competitive basis and will be fixed-term for three years. Applicants must have been awarded their PhD on or after 1 March 2019 or submit their thesis on or before 16 August 2022 (or make a convincing case for early career researcher status).

MQRF23 applicants must either reside in Australia and have appropriate work rights (either be an Australian Permanent Resident or Citizen) OR if they are applying from overseas, they must have appropriate work rights for Australia already (returning Australian Permanent Resident/Citizen) and be able to get themselves back to Australia to commence no later than 30 June 2023 or they forfeit their MQRF.

The Department of Media, Communications, Creative Arts, Language, and Literature (MCCALL) is interested in sponsoring postdoctoral research projects in the following areas:

· Media and Communications: screen practice; social media and digital culture; media history; journalism and non-fiction writing; communications; cultural studies.
· Creative Arts: music and related technologies; music production; the singing voice; popular music; ethnomusicology; creative processes; sound; improvisation; performance; dance; circus, industry practices.
· Languages and Cultures: global literatures and cultures; language studies and applied linguistics; the role of languages in cultural identities, and their impact on linguistic and literary products in social life.
· Literature: medievalism; medieval and early modern literature; modernism; historical fiction; popular fiction; literary approaches to film and television; postcolonialism; Australian fiction.

If you have an interest in applying for a Fellowship in the 2023 round through MCCALL, please send:

1. Provisional project title and a brief (400-word) project description
2. Name of potential Sponsor
3. Your PhD conferral date
4. A copy of your CV as an attachment including a list of publications. Publications should be listed under the headings: books, book chapters, peer-reviewed journal articles and other.
5. A copy of your Australian residency document – passport or visa.
6. to Bridget Griffen-Foley by Wednesday 30 March 2022: b.foley@mq.edu.au

If the Department is able to sponsor your application, you will be notified by Friday 8 April 2022. Sponsored applicants will then be invited to work with their sponsors to develop their formal Expressions of Interest which must be submitted to the Faculty of Arts by Wednesday 27 April 2022.

Donate to the Constant Mews Early Career Publication Prize

The Constant Mews Early Career Publication Prize will be offered in conjunction with the next three ANZAMEMS Conferences ( = $6,000 AUD total), beginning with Perth in 2022.

The ANZAMEMS Committee has also agreed to extend that to a total of ten occasions if we are able to raise $10,000 AUD. ANZAMEMS now invites contributions to establish the Prize pool. Contributions will be matched dollar-for-dollar, up to a total value of $10,000.

We have organised with The University of Western Australia (who is registered with the ACNC) to accept donations for the Constant Mews Prize on behalf of the Association. The donations are tax-deductible.

You are able to donate via the following link: https://campaign.uwa.edu.au/give-now.

Please specify the following in the comments section: ANZAMEMS Mews Prize.

Once you have donated, please contact me via email at info@anzamems.org with details of the date and amount of your donation.

If you would prefer to donate by bank transfer, please contact me via email at info@anzamems.org.

Announcing the new ANZAMEMS Constant Mews Early Career Publication Prize – Entry for the 2022 Prize opens on 7 March 2022 and closes on 3 April 2022

The ANZAMEMS committee is pleased to announce the launch of the Constant Mews Early Career Publication Prize, which honours the work of Professor Constant Mews, FAHA, a former President of ANZAMEMS, and distinguished scholar in the medieval history of religions, intellectual history, and textual editing and translation.

The Prize is established to encourage and reward outstanding work by Early Career Researchers in Constant’s broad areas of scholarly interest.

Winners will receive A$1500 in prize money (or NZD equivalent), a travel bursary of A$500 to provide assistance in attending the ANZAMEMS Conference, a year’s membership of ANZAMEMS (including a subscription to its journal Parergon), and a place at the ANZAMEMS Conference Dinner (at which the Prize is to be announced).

Entry for the 2022 Prize opens on 7 March 2022 and closes on 3 April 2022.

Articles published between 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2021 are eligible. Early online publication of articles will also be considered. The article must have been published online before the above cut-off date.

NB: Applicants who have previously applied for the Philippa Maddern ECR Publication Prize and Patricia Crawford Postgraduate Publication Prize, but were unsuccessful are eligible to apply for the Constant Mews Early Career Prize should they wish to apply.

For full details about the Constant Mews Early Career Publication Prize and to apply for the prize, please visit the ANZAMEMS website: https://www.anzamems.org/?page_id=8#Mews