ANZAMEMS ECR/POSTGRAD READING GROUP: SEMESTER 1, 2023

ANZAMEMS ECR/POSTGRAD READING GROUP: SEMESTER 1, 2023

The ANZAMEMS ECR/Postgraduate Reading Group will discuss the latest research in medieval and early modern studies, with the aim of promoting engagement with emerging and established fields of inquiry in MEMS research (see possible session themes below).

Virtual sessions of the reading group will take place via Zoom either monthly or every three weeks in the afternoon/evening between late February and June, 2023. Each session will take one or two recent articles or chapters related to a certain topic/methodological approach/trend in MEMS scholarship, and feature a short presentation from an ANZAMEMS member (whose own research is ideally in the vicinity of their chosen session theme), followed by questions-led discussion.

The reading group will be co-convened by Emma Rayner (PhD candidate, ANU) and Emily Chambers (PhD candidate, University of Nottingham).

We hope to foster a convivial and intellectually productive online space—think advanced graduate seminar!—where we can come together to talk all things MEMS research in a fairly informal manner, while expanding our networks or strengthening existing connections. Everyone is welcome, including more senior members of ANZAMEMS.

ANZAMEMS ECR or postgrad members who are interested in leading a session based around one of the below themes or a topic of your own selection, AND/OR who are interested in providing a short write-up of a session for a planned ANZAMEMS postgrad blog, please email Emma.Rayner@anu.edu.au / Emily.Chambers@nottingham.ac.uk no later than February 8, 2023. A finalized schedule and Zoom link will be circulated later in February.

Possible session themes include:
• Periodization
• Affect / emotion studies
• Critical race studies
• Cultures of materiality
• Ecocriticism
• Comparative / transnational studies
• Travel and cultural encounter
• Visual culture
• Religion, religious culture
• Borders, borderlands
• Language and translation
• Genealogies
• Geography, cartography
• Rhetoric
• Poetics
• Epistemologies
• Historiography
• Time and temporality
• Performance studies
• Knowledge production
• Humanism
• Virtue, vertu
• Cultures of collecting
• Book history
• Afterlives, reception studies
• Adaptation
• Digital Humanities
• Manuscript studies
• Incunabula
• Intellectual networks
• Devotional communities
• Reading, coteries
• Marginalia
• Disability studies
• Canonicity
• Gender studies
• Class studies
• Archives
• Methodologies
• Pedagogy

Access to the Index of Medieval Art Database Will Become Free on July 1, 2023

As of July 1, 2023, a paid subscription will no longer be required for access to the Index of Medieval Art database. This transition was made possible by a generous grant from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and the support of the Index’s parent department of Art & Archaeology at Princeton University.

Please read more about our momentous shift to open online access in a recent blog post written by director Pamela Patton:

“Access to the Index of Medieval Art Database Will Become Free on July 1, 2023.” The Index of Medieval Art (blog). January 12, 2023. https://ima.princeton.edu/2023/01/12/access-to-the-index-of-medieval-art-database-will-become-free-on-july-1-2023/.

Currently, the Index of Medieval Art database, accessed at this link https://theindex.princeton.edu/, can be browsed through its open access lists, as well as searched with keywords. Researchers can learn more about coverage through the browse function on the database, including over twenty thousand unique terms for iconographic subjects in medieval art, and plan to attend one of their upcoming info sessions this Spring term.

Index staff also remain available for researcher questions via their online form at https://ima.princeton.edu/research-inquiries/.

‘Religious Disbelief and the Emotions’ Conference

Religious Disbelief and the Emotions Conference
Zoom conference hosted by Macquarie University, 23rd and 24th January 2023

Throughout history, religious disbelievers have expressed themselves, sometimes in stark terms with strong emotions. Their beliefs may interact with or stem from emotions responding to hegemonic religious narratives and thought worlds. This conference seeks to bring together experts from a large variety of fields of historical and literary inquiry to help us better understand the extent to which interplays between religious disbeliefs and the emotions vary or remain similar in different time periods, locations, individuals, religious and cultural milieux, textual (or material) genres, and so on.

This conference will take place the 23rd through 24th of January 2023 on zoom.
Sydney/Melbourne/Canberra—6pm to 10pm
London—7am to 11am
Athens—9am to 1pm

Please see attached conference program for further details.

Call for Proposals for a future themed issue of Parergon

CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR THEMED ISSUE
Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Inc.)
www.parergon.org

The journal Parergon, in print since 1971, regularly produces one open issue and one themed issue annually.

Recent and forthcoming themed issues include:
• 2018, 35.2 Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Place: A Global Perspective, guest-edited by Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Hélène Sirantoine
• 2019, 36.2 Practice, Performance, and Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Cultural Heritage, guest-edited by Jane-Heloise Nancarrow and Alicia Marchant
• 2020, 37.2 Representing Queens, guest-edited by Stephanie Russo
• 2021, 38.2 Children and War, guest-edited by Katie Barclay, Dianne Hall and Dolly Mackinnon
• 2022, 39.2 Cultures of Compassion in Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Music, guest-edited by Diana Barnes

We now call for proposals for a future themed issue, specifically for 2025 (42.2)

Parergon publishes articles on all aspects of medieval and early modern studies, from early medieval through to the eighteenth century, and including the reception and influence of medieval and early modern culture in the modern world. We are particularly interested in research which takes new approaches and crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Parergon asks its authors to achieve international standards of excellence. Essays should be substantially original, advance research in the field, and have the potential to make a significant contribution to the critical debate.

Parergon is available in electronic form as part of Project Muse (from 1983), Australian
Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), Wilson’s Humanities Full Text (from 2008), and Gale
Academic One File (from 2008); it is included in the Clarivate Analytics Master Journal List of refereed journals and in the European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH), and is indexed for nine major database services, including ABELL, IMB and Scopus.

Themed issues contain up to ten essays, plus the usual reviews section. The guest editor is responsible for setting the theme and drawing up the criteria for the essays.

Timeline
Proposals for the 2025 issue (42.2) should be submitted to the Editors by Tuesday 28 February 2023.

Proposers are advised to review the full submission guidelines for essays at:
https://parergon.org/submissions.html

Proposals should contain the following:
1. A draft title for the issue.
2. A statement outlining the rationale for the issue.
3. Titles and abstracts of all the essays.
4. A short biographical paragraph for the guest editor(s) and for each contributor.
Proposals will be considered by a selection panel drawn from the Parergon International

Editorial Board who will be asked to assess and rank the proposals according to the following criteria:
• Suitability for the journal
• Originality of contribution to the chosen field
• Significance/importance of the proposed theme
• Potential for advancing scholarship in a new and exciting way
• Range and quality of authors

Guest editors will be notified of the result of their application by the beginning of April 2023.

The Editorial Process
Once a proposal has been accepted:
The guest editor(s) will commission and pre-select the essays before submitting them to the Parergon Editors by an agreed date.

The guest editor(s), in consultation with the Parergon editors, will arrange for independent and anonymous peer-review in accordance with the journal’s established criteria.

Occasionally a commissioned essay will be judged not suitable for publication in Parergon. This decision will be taken by the Parergon Editor, based on the anonymous expert reviews. Essays that have already been published or accepted for publication elsewhere are not eligible for inclusion in the journal.

Parergon’s Accessibility
Parergon is available in electronic form as part of Project MUSE (From Volume 1 (1983)),
Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008)

Parergon is included in the Clarivate Analytics Master Journal List of refereed journals and in the European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH), and is indexed for nine major database services, including ABELL, IMB and Scopus.

Parergon has an Open Access policy. Authors retain their own copyright, rather than
transferring it to Parergon/ANZAMEMS; and can make the “accepted version” of their article freely available on the Web.

Please send enquiries and proposals to the Editors, Prof Rosalind Smith and Prof Sarah
Ross at editor@parergon.org.

Call for Proposals for a future themed issue of Parergon, specifically for 2025 (42.2) – proposals due TUESDAY 28 FEBRURAY 2023

CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR THEMED ISSUE

Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Inc.)

www.parergon.org

The journal Parergon, in print since 1971, regularly produces one open issue and one themed issue annually.

Recent and forthcoming themed issues include:

  • 2018, 35.2 Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Place: A Global Perspective, guest-edited by Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Hélène Sirantoine
  • 2019, 36.2 Practice, Performance, and Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Cultural Heritage, guest-edited by Jane-Heloise Nancarrow and Alicia Marchant
  • 2020, 37.2 Representing Queens, guest-edited by Stephanie Russo
  • 2021, 38.2 Children and War, guest-edited by Katie Barclay, Dianne Hall and Dolly Mackinnon
  • 2022, 39.2 Cultures of Compassion in Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Music, guest-edited by Diana Barnes

We now call for proposals for a future themed issue, specifically for 2025 (42.2)

Parergon publishes articles on all aspects of medieval and early modern studies, from early medieval through to the eighteenth century, and including the reception and influence of medieval and early modern culture in the modern world. We are particularly interested in research which takes new approaches and crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Parergon asks its authors to achieve international standards of excellence. Essays should be substantially original, advance research in the field, and have the potential to make a significant contribution to the critical debate.

Parergon is available in electronic form as part of Project Muse (from 1983), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), Wilson’s Humanities Full Text (from 2008), and Gale Academic One File (from 2008); it is included in the Clarivate Analytics Master Journal List of refereed journals and in the European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH), and is indexed for nine major database services, including ABELL, IMB and Scopus.

Themed issues contain up to ten essays, plus the usual reviews section. The guest editor is responsible for setting the theme and drawing up the criteria for the essays.

Timeline

Proposals for the 2025 issue (42.2) should be submitted to the Editors by Tuesday 28 February 2023.

Proposers are advised to review the full submission guidelines for essays at: https://parergon.org/submissions.html

Proposals should contain the following:

  1. A draft title for the issue.
  2. A statement outlining the rationale for the issue.
  3. Titles and abstracts of all the essays.
  4. A short biographical paragraph for the guest editor(s) and for each contributor.

Proposals will be considered by a selection panel drawn from the Parergon International Editorial Board who will be asked to assess and rank the proposals according to the following criteria:

  • Suitability for the journal
  • Originality of contribution to the chosen field
  • Significance/importance of the proposed theme
  • Potential for advancing scholarship in a new and exciting way
  • Range and quality of authors

Guest editors will be notified of the result of their application by the beginning of April 2023.

The Editorial Process

Once a proposal has been accepted:

The guest editor(s) will commission and pre-select the essays before submitting them to the

Parergon Editors by an agreed date.

The guest editor(s), in consultation with the Parergon editors, will arrange for independent and anonymous peer-review in accordance with the journal’s established criteria.

Occasionally a commissioned essay will be judged not suitable for publication in Parergon. This decision will be taken by the Parergon Editor, based on the anonymous expert reviews.

Essays that have already been published or accepted for publication elsewhere are not eligible for inclusion in the journal.

Parergon’s Accessibility

Parergon is available in electronic form as part of Project MUSE (From Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008)

Parergon is included in the Clarivate Analytics Master Journal List of refereed journals and in the European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH), and is indexed for nine major database services, including ABELL, IMB and Scopus.

Parergon has an Open Access policy. Authors retain their own copyright, rather than transferring it to Parergon/ANZAMEMS; and can make the “accepted version” of their article freely available on the Web.

Please send enquiries and proposals to the Editors, Prof Rosalind Smith and Prof Sarah Ross at editor@parergon.org.

Mellon and Public Humanities fellowships are open for application

Mellon and Public Humanities fellowships are open for application! The deadline for both fellowships is February 1, 2022. 

The Mellon Fellowship is designed for junior faculty who currently hold a position in a United States university as an assistant professor. It is open to qualified applicants in all fields of Medieval Studies. The fellowship holder will pursue research in residence at Notre Dame’s famed Medieval Institute during the academic year (this is a nine-month position that begins mid-August). The intent of this Fellowship is to enable its holders to complete research and writing on a book manuscript in advance of tenure. More information

We also invite applications for the Public Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship. The fellow will devote the majority of the fellowship time to working closely with the Institute’s staff, especially its director of undergraduate studies and engagement, in the Institute’s outreach and engagement efforts directed at local schools as well as potential donors, alumni, and undergraduate majors and minors. The fellow will also work with the Assistant Director to prepare public humanities marketing and communications materials. The remainder of the fellow’s time may be devoted to research and/or teaching. More information

CfP: Unsettling Certainties, Conference of the Society for the History of Emotions

The call for papers for the Society for the History of Emotions’ Fourth Biennial Conference, under the theme ‘Unsettling Certainties’ is now open! The conference will take place at the University of Adelaide over 28 November to 1 December 2023

To live in uncertain times is to consider the possibilities of past, present and future anew. What was known, is reopened for question, and the possible futures built on such knowing become pressing concerns. Foundations are shaken, certainties unsettled, and people moved. The term ‘emotion’, with its etymological roots in the motions of public disturbance, is suggestive of the close affiliation between feelings, passions and embodied experiences and our encounters with certainty and its disruption. This conference, hosted by the Society for the History of Emotions, considers the theme of ‘Unsettling Certainties’ as an opportunity to explore how attending to emotion enables a richer understanding of the known and the unknowable, change and continuity, the fixed and fluid, crisis and stasis, past and future, not least as everyday and embodied experiences.

We call for proposals that address this theme, embracing a broad range of perspectives. Offerings might consider the theoretical, methodological and epistemological boundaries of emotions associated with certainty and uncertainty; shifting definitions and interpretations of emotions and emotion words; the social, economic, political and cultural dimensions of emotional encounters during certain and uncertain times, including changing values and beliefs, public disturbances, crises, and experiences of the ‘end of the world’; the evolving health and wellbeing impacts on individuals and groups, including in relation to gender, race, class and religion; the representation and reimagining of un/settled feelings in literature, art, music, philosophy and science; environmental and ecological perspectives; and creativity and imagination as responses to change and new futures. 

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, emotions in relation to:
– Certainty and the assured
– Risk, uncertainty and the unknown
– Security, comfort and stability
– Anxiety and worry
– Epistemologies and beliefs
– Imagination and boundaries of the real
– The natural and supernatural
– End of the old and encounters with the new
– Crisis, challenge and transformation
– Creativity, expression, and evolution
– Hope, activism and community building
– Moving places and fixed spaces
– Infirmity and death

We welcome submissions from scholars of all levels for any time period, geography, and scholarly discipline, including inter- and transdisciplinary contributions. Papers that do not address the core theme will be considered, but may be given a lower priority, if space is limited.

Proposals can take the form of:
– Individual papers of 20 minutes’ duration;
– 90-minute panels or roundtables, that should include time given to discussion; – Posters.

If you would like to propose an alternative format, please approach the organisers to discuss. We hope to offer a hybrid option for virtual attendees. Please note if you need this on your abstract.

Please send a Word document with a title and 250-word abstract for each paper/poster proposed and a two-sentence biography and email address for each speaker. For panels and roundtables, please also send an overarching title and short rationale and identify the main correspondent for communications.

Proposals should be emailed to unsettlingcertainties@gmail.com Deadline for call for papers: 1 March 2023

Conference organisers: Katie Barclay, Diana Barnes, Keagan Brewer, Sonia Cancian, Michael Champion, Vesna Drapac, Kirk Essary, Michael Heim, Grace Howe, James Kane, Meagan Nattrass, and Claire Walker

Postgraduate and Early Career Paper Prize

The best paper presented by a postgraduate or early career researcher will have the opportunity to win an essay prize worth $100 and to have an article based on the paper considered for publication in Emotions: History, Culture, Society.

Applicants must be within five years after award of the PhD (extended to seven years if not in stable university employment or with significant career interruptions).

To be considered for this prize, participants must signal their wish to be considered when they submit their abstract. They must also submit a written version of the paper by the 25 November 2023. Judges will base their decision both on the presentation and the written version received.

Attention Early Career Researchers!

Aspire to deliver a keynote lecture at a major international conference? We invite early career researchers (ECRs) to propose a keynote lecture addressing the conference theme. This scheme is open to all disciplines of expertise that address the conference theme, and to researchers in university employment as well as those who are not.

Applicants must:
• Have an outstanding track record relative to opportunity;
• Be within five years after award of the PhD (extended to seven years if not in stable university

employment or with significant career interruptions).

To apply, please submit a proposed titled, an abstract of 300-400 words, a bio and a CV (3 pages max) to unsettlingcertainties@gmail.com by 1 March 2023.

In selecting this keynote, consideration will be given to diversity and broad representation among the group of keynotes. We also reserve the right to seek third-party testimony as to the researcher’s capacity to speak and deliver scholarly presentations. The winning keynote lecturer will have flights, accommodation and registration covered. It is anticipated that an article based on the paper would be published in Emotions: History, Culture, Society, subject to peer review.

Nov 24 CEMS End of Year Reception: Evening with Matthew Winterbottom

The ANU Centre for Early Modern Studies is pleased to welcome Matthew
Winterbottom, Curator of Western Art Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, as our special guest for the final CEMS event for 2022. Matthew has extensive expertise in early modern European decorative arts across diverse media and in the history of cabinets of curiosity.

Join CEMS for an evening in conversation with Matthew followed by drinks, in-person on the ANU campus. This is the first in-person seminar held by CEMS and promises to be a wonderful evening for our members and wider audience to meet and mingle before the end of year.

Matthew Winterbottom is Curator of Western Art Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Ashmolean Museum. His research interests cover a wide range of European decorative arts from the late medieval to the early twentieth centuries, and he has expertise in furniture, ceramics, glass and textiles and sculpture, with a particular interest in 17th- and 18th-century British and European silver and goldsmiths’ work. He is actively researching the Michael Wellby bequest – a collection of 500 pieces of Continental goldsmiths’ work and Kunstkammer objects – that was bequeathed to the Ashmolean Museum in 2012. Matthew has extensive knowledge of the history of Kunstkammern, Schatzkammern and cabinets of curiosities of the early modern period and of the revival of interest in such collections in the 19th and 20th centuries that led to the extensive faking and reproduction of precious objects.

Matthew has over 25 years’ experience working with and researching European decorative arts and is committed to exploring ways of making this material engaging and accessible to museum visitors. He has held curatorial roles at the Victoria & Albert Museum, the Royal Collection and the Holburne Museum in Bath. He joined the Department of Western Art in the Ashmolean Museum in March 2014 as Curator of Nineteenth-Century Decorative Arts where he was tasked with building a new collection of Nineteenth-Century decorative arts and redisplaying the Nineteenth-Century Art Galleries. Since January 2017, he has been responsible for the entire Western Art Sculpture and Decorative Arts Collections.

Matthew is at ANU in November as an international visitor at the ANU School of Art and Design funded by the ANU Research School of Humanities and the Arts.

This event is presented by the Centre for Early Modern Studies

For further information and to register please see: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/anu-centre-for-early-modern-studies-end-of-year-reception-tickets-459403597527

Mapping Culture and History Workshop, University of Newcastle/Online, 17-18 November

Join us for an event celebrating the possibilities of digital mapping for the humanities, hosted by the Time-Layered Cultural Map of Australia (based in Newcastle) and the Australian Cultural Data Engine (led by the University of Melbourne).

We are bringing together instructors, presenters, and anyone interested in learning about mapping in a series of workshop sessions and plenary talks. We are targeting honours and postgraduate students, humanities researchers, gallery, library and museum staff, and local historians, in particular, but all are welcome. The face to face events will take place at the University of Newcastle’s NUSpace building in the city campus, with some hybrid sessions and some via Zoom only.

Please review the workshop program in order to select workshops. Session descriptions can be found here. Zoom details for Zoom sessions will be circulated closer to the event.

We have bursaries available for Indigenous researchers and Early and Mid Career researchers, sponsored by ARDC and the College of Human and Social Futures at Newcastle – see the website here

For any other event enquiries, please contact tlcmapworkshop@newcastle.edu.au

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/mapping-culture-and-history-workshop-tickets-428326354657

Early modern panels are 11:00am-1:00pm on Friday, via Zoom, ‘Premodern Material Cultures in Motion’: https://hughdhorg.wordpress.com/mapping-culture-and-history/42-2/

And 2:00pm-4:00pm on Friday, in person, ‘Mapping the Roman Campagna — challenges, questions, discoveries’: https://hughdhorg.wordpress.com/mapping-culture-and-history/session-16-workshop-katrina-grant-anu-and-lisa-beaven-latrobe/

CFP: Ecological Shakespeare in Performance 

Ecological Shakespeare in Performance

Friday 28 April 2023

James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland

Keynote Speaker: Professor Gretchen Minton – Montana State University, 2023 Fulbright Scholar

This one-day event will include a keynote presentation, interdisciplinary guest speakers, papers, workshop time and a short performance.

Registration is free and includes lunch and dinner.

Proposals are invited on topics including (but not limited to):

  • Shakespeare and ecocriticism
  • Blue humanities
  • Shakespeare in performance
  • Australian Shakespeare adaptations
  • Environmental theatre
  • Creative projects

Please submit your 250 word proposal and bio by Friday 16 December 2022. To submit your proposal or to discuss possibilities, please contact Dr Claire Hansen (Claire.Hansen@anu.edu.au) and Professor Gretchen Minton (Gretchen.Minton@montana.edu).