CFP Annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum

41st Annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum:
Scent and Fragrance in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance
Keene State College
Keene, NH, USA
Friday and Saturday April 17-18, 2020

Call for Papers and Sessions
We are delighted to announce that the 41st Medieval and Renaissance Forum: Scent and Fragrance in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance will take place on Friday, April 17 and Saturday April 18, 2020 at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire. 

We welcome abstracts (one page or less) or panel proposals that discuss smell and fragrance in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Papers and sessions, however, need not be confined to this theme but may cover other aspects of medieval and Renaissance life, literature, languages, art, philosophy, theology, history, and music.

This year’s keynote speaker is Deirdre Larkin, Managing Horticulturist at The Cloisters Museum and Gardens from 2007 to 2013, who will speak on “Every Fragrant Herb: The Medieval Garden and the Gardens of The Cloisters.”

Deirdre Larkin is a horticulturist and historian of plants and gardens. She holds an MA in the history of religions from Princeton University and received her horticultural training at the New York Botanical Garden. She was associated with the Gardens of The Cloisters for more than twenty years and was responsible for all aspects of their development, design, and interpretation. Ms. Larkin was the originator of and principal contributor to the Medieval Garden Enclosed blog, published on the MMA website from 2008 through 2013. Ms. Larkin lectures frequently for museums, historical societies, and horticultural organizations. In 2017, she was a Mellon Visiting Scholar at the Humanities Institute of the New York Botanical Garden, where she researched the fortunes and reputations of medieval European plants now naturalized in North America. Her gardens in upstate New York serve as a laboratory for further investigations in the field.

Students, faculty, and independent scholars are welcome. Please indicate your status (undergraduate, graduate, or faculty), affiliation (if relevant), and full contact information (including email address) on your proposal.

We welcome undergraduate sessions, but ask that students obtain a faculty member’s approval and sponsorship.  

Please submit abstracts, audio/visual needs, and full contact information to Dr. Robert G. Sullivan, Assistant Forum Director at sullivan@german.umass.edu.

Abstract deadline: January 15, 2020

Presenters and early registration: March 15, 2020

As always, we look forward to greeting returning and first-time participants to Keene in April!

Western Civilisation in the Twenty-First Century

Registration is now open for ‘Western Civilisation in the Twenty-First Century’, to be held on 20-21 February 2020 at the University of Adelaide.

This symposium provides a moment to reflect on the concept of Western Civilisation today, not just as a topic of historical interest but an idea that continues to hold a significant political function. What role do the histories that we write and teach play in the production of discourses of ‘western civilisation’ or resistance to it? What role do historians have in shaping ideas about the past in the present? And what responsibility do we have towards ‘western civilisation’ as a discourse? What is the future of ‘Western Civilisation’, both as taught in universities and in the public sphere?

This event is being supported by ANZAMEMS. Registration is free and ANZAMEMS is funding travel bursaries to facilitate attendance for postgraduates, early career scholars and those without institutional support.

To register, please follow the registration link from the conference homepage: https://westernciv2020.wordpress.com/

For further information on bursaries and to apply, see https://westernciv2020.wordpress.com/bursaries/

For information on the conference venue and nearby accommodation, see https://westernciv2020.wordpress.com/location/

CFP Viator: Looking Ahead: Global Encounters in the North Atlantic, ca. 350–1300

A special dossier in Viator

Co-edited by Nahir Otaño Gracia, Nicole Lopez-Jantzen, and Erica Weaver

In the last few years, several urgent interventions have begun to reshape medieval studies as a more capacious and inclusive field. Scholars such as Geraldine Heng, Monica Green, and Michael Gomez have expanded our understanding of the multifaceted interactions between and among Africa, Asia, Europe, and elsewhere, while Adam Miyashiro and Mary Rambaran-Olm have urged us to reassess the North Atlantic in particular. Traditionally, scholars have tended to work within national borders or to focus on how North Atlantic cultures changed the rest of the globe rather than how they were themselves changed by global interactions, with drastic consequences for our field––especially for our earliest periods.

In order to continue these important conversations and to expand what our scholarship can look like going forward, this special essay cluster seeks to provide a platform for early-career scholars to propose new critical directions for the study of the early medieval North Atlantic, broadly encompassing ca. 350–1300. We thus invite short, rigorous interventions (2000–3500 words each), in the model of the popular conference genre of “lightning talks.” In particular, we seek imaginative new work that expands the contours of early medieval studies and challenges, or transgresses, its standard disciplinary, temporal, and linguistic boundaries. Following the example set by the IONA: Islands of the North Atlantic conferences, we reject the unproductive disciplinary divides that have separated the study of England, Wales, Ireland, Francia, Scandinavia, the Iberian Peninsula, Africa, and even the Mediterranean both from each other and from points further afield along the Atlantic rim and beyond. We also aim to break down the divisions that have artificially separated Late Antiquity and the early and high Middle Ages. We are intentionally leaving this call for papers very broad, because we come from the perspective that the global does not exclude the local, and vice-versa. Moreover, the insular can be archipelagic. We welcome essays that bring together North Atlantic and Mediterranean Studies, or that read what has been seen as national literature from a transnational perspective.

In the spirit of emerging from our own linguistic silos and in Viator’s usual practice, we thus welcome work from scholars writing in English, Spanish, and French. Additionally, we particularly invite work from graduate students, postdocs, independent scholars, and members of the precariat as well as contributions that are explicitly feminist, queer, anti-racist, and decolonial. We would like to be as inclusive as possible, so please contact us if you have any questions.

Short abstracts of around 200 words are due by December 2 to ViatorIssue@gmail.com, with essays to be submitted by January 15.

Folger Institute Research Fellowships 2020-21

www.folger.edu/institute/fellowships

The Folger Shakespeare Library is embarking on a major renovation project to commence in early 2020. While this work is underway, the Folger Institute is committed to continuing its support of collections-based research, and to providing scholars with the resources they need to pursue and advance their work. The renovation offers the Institute the opportunity to create new kinds of awards, to make fellowships more adaptable, and to forge new relationships with archives, collections, libraries, and museums around the world.

Fellowship awards will be $3,500 to support four continuous weeks of work. The deadline for applications is January 1, 2020. Fellowships may be undertaken between July 2020 and May 2021.

Applicants should make a strong case for their proposed topic’s importance, its relevance to a field of study broadly supported by the Folger Library’s collections and programs, and the originality and sophistication of its approach. They should also describe the proposed location(s) of their work, with a justification of why and how this agenda will advance their project. Here are some scenarios an applicant might propose:

• A researcher is planning a trip to multiple archives in order to consult a range of rare materials, all in one trip.
• A researcher requests access to select electronic resources while writing from home.
• A researcher needs the dedicated time to work with a local collection.
• A researcher wishes to conduct research at a repository which is non-traditional, under-funded, or under-utilized.

The Folger has also arranged for a select number of archives, collections, libraries, and museums, without research fellowship endowments of their own, to host Folger fellows at their institutions. Each of these awards comes with an assurance of availability of collections items, space to work, and a contact person for reference consultations. Learn more about hosting partnerships at Jamestown Rediscovery, The John Rylands Research Institute, the Kislak Center at the University of Pennsylvania, Shakespeare’s Globe, and the Wellcome Collection.

Apply now online. Deadline for research fellowships is January 1, 2020.

Parergon Reviews Editor

Dr Hélène Sirantoine, the Reviews Editor of Parergon, has signalled her intention to step down from the role at the next ANZAMEMS AGM (tentatively scheduled for April 2020) and so we are seeking a new Reviews Editor. Members interested in further details about this position vacancy should contact Parergon Editor Professor Susan Broomhall (editor@parergon.org) or Dr Hélène Sirantoine (reviews@parergon.org)

CFP Field of Cloth of Gold Conference 2020

In celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Field of Cloth of Gold and as part of the AHRC funded Network “Henry VIII on Tour: Tudor Palaces and Royal Progresses”, Historic Royal Palaces will be hosting a two-day conference on 29-30 June 2020 at Hampton Court Palace.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
• Simon Thurley
• Mary Hill Cole, Mary Baldwin University
• Glenn Richardson, St Mary’s University
• Tracy Borman, Historic Royal Palaces (Introduction)

We invite proposals for papers of 20 minutes reflecting the conference theme. In particular, we encourage papers that examine not only that most spectacular of royal progresses, the 1520 Field of Cloth of Gold expedition itself, but the phenomenon of royal progresses more generally, including the logistics of royal travel and the politics of progress. We would also like to explore broader aspects of the Tudor court on progress, including the social, religious, chivalric and cultural implications of royal progresses (e.g. the hunting, jousting, music, drama, art and architecture associated with the royal palaces and other progress venues). Papers addressing a comparative European or international aspect of the theme are welcomed as, too, are contributions that consider the theme from the point of view of heritage management, heritage science and curatorial practice. We encourage proposals from scholars at all stages of their career, including early career researchers and PhD students (for whom a discounted registration rate will be available).

Please send abstracts of 250 words to Dr Laura Tompkins, Research Manager, HRP (Laura.Tompkins@hrp.org.uk) by 12 January 2020.

This information is also available on the HRP website.

Organising Committee: Anthony Musson (HRP), Tom Betteridge (Brunel), John Cooper (York), Suzannah Lipscomb (Roehampton), Alden Gregory (HRP)

CFP Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference

The organisers and the Programme Committee invite proposals for the 2020 Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference to be held in Edinburgh on 1-4 July 2020.

Proposals on all topics relating to Medieval and Renaissance Music, broadly construed, are welcomed, but we are particularly interested in the following areas: Music in Britain; Chant; Gender and music; Music and medievalism; Music and the environment; Music outside of continental Europe; Early Music and Digital Technologies; The state of the discipline

Conference languages: English, French, German, Italian, Spanish

Possible formats of presentations include, but are not limited to:
• individual papers of 20 minutes
• paired papers
• themed sessions
• round tables
• workshops/ lecture-recitals
• posters
The conference will include a dedicated poster session.

Please send proposals to medren2020@gmail.com by 31 December. Notification of acceptance will be given by February 14th. Proposals should include:
·        Title of paper
·        Speaker(s)
·        Affiliation
·        A proposal of c.250 words
For themed sessions:
• title of paper
• chair (if known)
• names of all participants
• total required duration (blocks of 90 minutes are preferred)
• short description of contents

Registration will go live on February 1 2020 at the following address: https://www.efdelegates.ed.ac.uk/MedRen2020

Programme Committee:
• James Cook
• Marianne Gillion
• Thomas Schmidt
• Adam Whittaker
• Miriam Wendling
• Raquel Rojo Carillo,
• Tess Knighton,
• Elisabeth Giselbrecht
• Victori Coelho
• Catherine Bradly
• Antonio Chemotti

Call for Nominations: Parergon Early Career Committee

Parergon, the journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early
Modern Studies (Inc.), seeks nominations for interested early career scholars within
ANZAMEMS to participate as members of the 2020 Early Career Committee (ECC). The aim
of this committee is to recognise and support early career researcher contributions to
ANZAMEMS, and specifically, Parergon.

The ECC meets quarterly, and offers an opportunity to provide advice to the Editorial team and
gain a deeper understanding of the detailed intellectual and practical processes of production
of a prestigious, peer-reviewed scholarly journal.

Additionally, participation in the ECC will provide valuable service experience for those
interested in pursuing academic and publishing career pathways. Membership of the ECC is
not a paid position.

A maximum of 6 places are currently available for the 2020 ECC Committee.

Terms are for a calendar year, with a possible maximal renewal of an additional, immediate
year.

Nominations are sought from late-stage doctoral students through to those five years post PhD
or equivalent), who are current members of ANZAMEMS.

Applications should consist of a cv, and a covering email outlining disciplinary expertise to the
Editor of Parergon, susan.broomhall@uwa.edu.au

Doctoral students wishing to apply should also provide an email from their supervisor
indicating support for their application.

Nominations close on 6 December 2019. Successful candidates will be notified in late
December.

For more information including selection criteria, see the attached PDF:

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CFP Medieval English Theatre Conference

Consumption, Performance, and Early Theatre, University of Wolverhampton・Saturday, 4 April 2020

Consumption involves the using up of a resource, whether through acts of imbibing or intake and acts of expenditure or through decaying or wasting away. Early performance relies on consumption, whether this takes the form of Eucharistic consumption accompanying liturgy; Eve’s sinful act of consumption that provided pretext and plot for urban biblical pageants; the use of performance to sell goods and medicines; the material goods required to create dramatic spectacle; the consumption of drink, ideas and time by spectators and performers; or the Tudor feasts that produced space for dramatic interludes. The Records of Early English Drama, with their lists of goods, payments and services, provide an archive of evidence for consumption practice. Yet acts of consumption in early drama are often fraught. Consumption is as often used to articulate doubt or mark characters and performance makers as morally dubious as it is to ensnare the senses of audiences. In a climate both preoccupied with material consumption at a global level and in which we, as researchers, theatre practitioners and teachers are frequently reminded that our labour is also consumer material, this conference seeks to examine how consumption is manifested, managed and questioned in early performance. Topics might include but are not limited to:

• The consumption of raw materials and/ or material culture in the production and performance of early drama
• Food or fasting in early performance; the morality, ethics and/or theology of consumption
• Economies of consumption in early performance
• Ritual performance and faith; inclusion and community
• Subversive consumption, over-consumption and/or consumption as a source of ‘othering’
• Consumption, spectacle and the senses
• The consumption of play manuscripts and texts
• Critical reflections on the role of consumption within modern performances and broadcasts of early drama
• Critical reflections on the role of consumption in early drama pedagogy and/or research

We invite 300-word proposals from scholars at any stage of study or career, for 20 minute papers or roundtable sessions; please submit your proposals by 1 December 2019 to Daisy Black d.black3@wlv.ac.uk

On the day before the conference (Friday, 3 April 2020) there will be a Postgraduate and Early Career Symposium organised with the Early English Drama & Performance Network; more information about this will be posted soon.

Further details and registration information will be posted soon at Medieval English Theatre.

Bloomsbury Medieval Studies

Bloomsbury has recently launched a new interdisciplinary digital resource, Bloomsbury Medieval Studies. It brings together high-quality secondary content with visual primary sources, an exclusive new reference work and object images into one cross-searchable platform, to open up the medieval world for students and scholars across this rich field of study.

This unprecedented platform comprises content from Bloomsbury and other leading publishers in the field, including I.B. Tauris, Amsterdam University Press and Arc Humanities Press – as well as medieval maps from the British Library and newly digitized incunabula from Senate House Library.

Users will benefit from instant, searchable access to a new and exclusively commissioned reference work, the Encyclopedia of the Global Middle Ages. Written by an international group of scholars, it offers a non-Eurocentric approach with articles including:

– Thematic overviews of intellectual discourse, migration and trade systems
– Primary source analyses of Maya Civilization, Japan and Korean Kingdom of Silla
– Core Case Studies of queens and powerful women of the Middle Ages.

The platform also provides full digital access to over 150 eBooks– ranging from primary texts to research monographs, companions, primary source readers and more.

Interested in finding out more?
Bloomsbury Medieval Studies will be available for 30-day free trials and can be purchased on a perpetual access basis. If you would like to register interest in a trial, or have any questions about the product please contact Katie.Dean@bloomsbury.com.

The full press release including further details of resources available can be downloaded here.

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