Category Archives: networks

Medieval and Early Modern Centre April Newsletter

Medieval and Early Modern Centre, April 2022 Newsletter


April is a quieter month for events: Easter, mid-semester break, and Anzac Day land squarely in its middle and – hopefully – give us all some much-needed respite.

This month’s MEMC lunchtime seminar – on Friday 29 April – is a double-bill. We will have the opportunity to hear shorter papers (about 20 minutes each) from two of the Centre’s Honorary Associates, Andrew Mellas and Penny Nash. As you can see in the abstracts below, the presentations bring us into the material, sensory, and emotional worlds of the European middle ages, taking us from Byzantine liturgy through Carolingian, Ottonian, and Salian dress and costume.

We look forward to seeing you on Zoom at the end of the month. Meanwhile, enjoy the upcoming break,
John Gagné, Director

Events
MEMC Lunchtime Seminar

Friday 29 April
12:00 noon – 1:30 pm

Andrew Mellas (MEMC, Sydney), and Penny Nash (MEMC, Sydney)

(1) Andrew Mellas, “Romanos the Melodist and the Liturgical Emotions of Pascha”

The hymnos of Romanos the Melodist sought to shape an emotional and liturgical community in Constantinople. Retelling the sacred stories of Scripture, they become affective scripts for the faithful, teaching them to yearn for compunction, weep with grief and dance for joy. Emotions formed part of the desire for and experience of the salvific mystery in Byzantium. However, they were transformed together with the whole of human nature in this mystical experience.

This paper will explore one of Romanos’ paschal songs, On the Resurrection VI, which invited the faithful to experience the dialectic between the beginning of salvation history and the end of all things, weaving together the fallenness of the congregation with the promise of rebirth. While this paper will also allude to other hymns composed for Pascha, it will consider how the tears of Romanos’ protagonist, Mary Magdalen – who was conquered by weeping but overcome by the fire of love – embodied a metamorphosis of grief into joy. In the liminal space between the absence and presence of Christ’s body, during the interlude between crucifixion and resurrection, Romanos’ song elicited a longing for the eschaton that is yet to come but already dawning.

See below for Zoom link

(2) Penny Nash, “Pointy Hats, Glittering Headdresses and Audacious Demeanour as Symbols of Power and Sovereignty”

The examination of clothing, jewellery, gifts, and other material objects, together with the deportment of the giver and the receiver of such items, especially in how they are visually presented, is crucial in understanding the intentions of the participants.

The paper deals with the symbolism of the posture and clothing, especially headgear, in a number of depictions of historical figures. Examined are Pepin’s and Charlemagne’s pointy hats; Theophanu’s gifts to the West from Byzantium; the bareheaded portrait of Henry, dux of Bavaria (‘the Wrangler’); and Countess Matilda’s possible claim to royality in her manuscript portrait with the Germanic king Henry IV and Abbot Hugh of Cluny at Canossa – among other images.

This paper puts into historical perspective selected artworks created between the eighth and early-twelfth centuries in Western Europe (the Carolingian, Ottonian, and Salian periods). It demonstrates how important representations can be in depicting and nuancing our understanding of the tensions and concerns of the people involved and prefaces later portrayals in the Renaissance.

Join via Zoom (same link for both talks): https://uni-sydney.zoom.us/j/89068632840

CFP Royal Studies Network New Digital Seminar Series

The Royal Studies Network are developing a new Digital Seminar Series for members launching in January 2021. The call for proposals for seminars is now open and can be found here: royalstudiesnetwork.org/digital-seminar-series. The deadline for consideration in the 2021 series is 1 December 2020.

For more information or to join the Royal Studies Network please see the website.

ACU Medieval and Early Modern Studies Seminar Series

The members of the Medieval and Early Modern Studies program at ACU are delighted to invite you to attend our next virtual seminar on August 21 at 2:00pm AEST:

“Plague Time: Space, Fear and Emergency Statecraft in Early-Modern Italy”, presented by Nicholas Eckstein (University of Sydney).

Please find the poster for the event attached below. To RSVP for Zoom details, please email: MEMS.seminar@acu.edu.au.

CARMEN: The Worldwide Medieval Network – (Virtual) Annual General Meeting 2020

The annual CARMEN open meeting brings together scholars and professionals from across the world in participatory and interactive formats: project development workshops; training and networking; the ‘Forum’ showcase for projects, institutions and research centres; and, just as importantly, opportunities for socializing.

This year’s annual meeting, originally planned to take place in Dublin at Trinity College on 1-2 September 2020, will do all of these things; due to the Covid-19 pandemic, however, it will do them online! We are introducing a series of virtual-friendly modifications to the CARMEN formats you are familiar with (or want to familiarize yourself with), and will be welcoming your input on how we can improve this format for a possible hybrid future, enabling people to participate in CARMEN’s international networks in new ways.

The CARMEN annual meeting always has a thematic strand: this year’s is Environment. A Plenary Round Table will take place during the meeting and will be accompanied on Twitter. We now invite proposals for the workshops, which will take place on 1 and 2 September between 2 and 4 pm GMT +1 in webinar format. The organiser of each workshop will be responsible for online hosting, and will provide a link together with a short description; advance registration (by 31 July 2020) will be necessary. Click here for more information.

Please register to join in the meeting here via Eventbrite.

Medieval and Early Modern Orients

Medieval and Early Modern Orients (MEMOs) is an AHRC-funded project that seeks to further knowledge and understanding of the early interactions between England and the Islamic worlds. Through our pages and our blog we hope to create an accessible space to reveal the exciting discoveries of researchers as they navigate the seas of history and literature, and investigate the intersecting webs of our pasts.

Like the engagements it explores, MEMOs is also a point of engagement. It is a space for researchers, practitioners and anyone with an interest to connect and stay up-to-date with news and events in the field, as well as the work of colleagues and specialists. By this we hope to build a network of knowledge and appreciation around the longstanding global relationships that continue to define our interconnected identities and shape our world.

MEMOs welcomes new contributors, particularly those based in Australasia.

Medieval Academy of America Webinar: The Mother of All Pandemics: The State of Black Death Research in the Era of COVID-19

This coming Friday, 15 May, there will be a PUBLIC WEBINAR sponsored by the Medieval Academy of America:

The Mother of All Pandemics: The State of Black Death Research in the Era of COVID-19

15 May 2020
1 – 3 PM EDT
Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89832471831

Questions can be submitted via Twitter by using the hashtag #MAAWebinar. The webinar and following Q&A will be recorded.

The session will, for the first time ever, bring together the world’s leading authorities on the “new paradigm” of plague studies, which uses new findings in the genetics of Yersinia pestis to argue that the Black Death was a real semi-global pandemic: affecting not simply Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East, but most of Asia and probably major parts of Africa, too.

No registration is required. Just show up. Though it is recommended that you arrive early as spaces are limited. This will be the first Webinar dedicated to the Black Death since our new pandemic began. If you haven’t updated your Black Death teaching notes in the past decade (or more), you’re in for some big surprises.

For more information click here. To access the recording of this event, check out this MAA link a few days after the event to get the link to the MAA YouTube page where it will be posted. A bibliography is also being prepared that will be posted as a Google Doc.

Australasian Crusades Network

The Australasian Crusades Studies Network (ACSN) is holding a Meet and Greet via Zoom on 14 May at 1pm AEST for researchers, early career academics and postgraduates who work in the field of crusades studies and are based in Australia or New Zealand. The purpose of this Zoom meeting is to bring together people working on the crusades and crusades-related topics in Australia and New Zealand and who are interested in the ACSN for an informal discussion. In particular, we would like to use this opportunity to begin fostering a friendly and active community, and to discuss ideas for the future of the Network. To express your interest in attending and to get the Zoom details for the meeting, please contact Dr Beth Spacey (b.spacey@uq.edu.au).