Category Archives: member news

CFP: The Languages of Medieval England

The French Journal of Medieval English Studies Études Médiévales Anglaises is seeking
submissions for its 102nd issue focusing on “the Languages of Medieval England”. The papers, written in French or English, should be submitted to Elise Louviot by December 15th, 2022 (see more information below). Authors who wish to submit a paper are advised to get in touch and submit a title with a brief description of content as soon as convenient.
It is a well-known fact that Medieval England, like most places at any given time in human history, was multilingual. The languages of Medieval England are many: Brittonic, Latin, English, Old Norse and French, to name but the most important, and each item on that list can be further subdivided into several varieties (along geographical, but also sociological & stylistic lines).
Examining the languages of Medieval England requires us to think of how they interacted and related to each other, from a number of perspectives.
From a sociolinguistic perspective, it is worth investigating the respective statuses of these languages. Who used them? For what purposes? What was the meaning of using a certain language in this or that context? For instance, the broad lines of the interplay between English and Latin throughout the period are well-known: Old English gradually challenged the dominant status of Latin as the official written language; the Conquest re-instated Latin in its dominant position and that dominance gradually eroded in favour of English once again over time. However, a closer look shows that the evolution is neither universal nor straightforward. Ingrid Ivarsen’s work on Anglo- Saxon legislation, for instance, reveals a much more complex evolution, from an initial
multilingualism partly obscured by later transmission, through a mostly monolingual English phase under the reign of Alfred, to a newly multilingual period, where Wulfstan of York once again makes use of Latin (Ivarsen 2021).
Multilingualism can also be examined in terms of language contact. How much did the
languages of medieval England influence each other? Which parts of the language were more readily influenced and to what extent is it possible to trace the paths taken by linguistic innovations spurred on by language contact? In many general descriptions of the History of the English language, French is assumed to be the language of the upper class and to have exerted an influence especially on areas connected to an aristocratic lifestyle. However, recent studies have demonstrated the influence of French vocabulary in various occupational domains, proving that “French evidently exerted influence not only on the language of social elite pursuits, but also on that of the technology relating to everyday occupations” (Ingham, Sylvester & Marcus, 2019).
The materiality of the languages of medieval England is also worth examining. To what extent does the language of coins and inscribed objects differ from language preserved on parchment? Why use runes on parchment? How different are scribal practices from one language to another? Which conventions of writing can be said to be language-independent (see for instance Laura Wright’s work on abbreviations in business writings, 2011)?
For this issue of Études Médiévales Anglaises, we welcome papers on all aspects of linguistic diversity in Medieval England.

The papers, written in English or in French, must be sent before December 15th, 2022 to Elise Louviot (elise.louviot@univ-reims.fr). Études Médiévales Anglaises uses double-blind peer review. The stylesheet to be used may be found on our website: https://amaes.jimdo.com/submit-a-paper/

All papers published with us are made open access after a two-year embargo and indexed by the MLA bibliography. You may consult our editorial policy here: https://amaes.jimdofree.com/editorial-policy/

Reminder: ANZAMEMS Maddern-Crawford Network Event Academic experiences, transitions, support, leadership

Call for Expressions of Interest: ANZAMEMS Maddern-Crawford Network Event
Academic experiences, transitions, support, leadership

The ANZAMEMS Maddern-Crawford Network is delighted to host an in-person networking event for female/female-identifying/non-binary ANZAMEMS members.

This event aims to bring together academics at all career stages (full-time; part-time; casual; honorary; independent scholars; postgraduates) for a series of workshops and talks with the purpose of:
• Networking;
• Sharing career experiences and challenges;
• Learning about leadership;
• Creating support and mentoring opportunities for postgrads, ECRs, MCRs and senior scholars in MEMS disciplines.

The sessions will be arranged around themes including ‘experience’, ‘leadership’, ‘support’, and ‘transitions’ and will include ample opportunity for informal discussion.

Where: ACU St Patrick’s campus, East Melbourne, Victoria.
When: November 8-9, 2022.
Eligibility: Female/female-identifying/non-binary ANZAMEMS members at all career stages.
Support: A limited number of bursaries for flights and accommodation available for Australian and New Zealand participants without other forms of financial support. Lunch on both days, morning/afternoon tea on both days, and a dinner on the 8th November will be provided.

There are a limited number of places for this event.

Please send a short (one-page) CV together with a short expression of interest to Prof. Megan Cassidy-Welch by Monday 29 August 2022. Email: Megan.Cassidy-Welch@acu.edu.au

This event is generously supported by the Australian Catholic University’s Medieval and Early Modern Studies Program.

Dr Victoria Flood lectures at UWA

Dr Victoria Flood (University of Birmingham) will be visiting The University of Western Australia later this month. Dr Flood’s visit is supported by the Institute of Advanced Studies and Medieval and Early Modern Studies at UWA.

As well as being one of the keynote speakers at the upcoming ‘Monsters’ conference to be hosted in part at UWA (from 6–9 September), Dr Flood will also give two public lectures later this month. Please circulate the details amongst your networks. All are welcome!

Witchcraft and Communities of Wonder: From Gervase of Tilbury to the Malleus Maleficarum
Date: Wednesday 24 August 2022
Time: 7:00pm (AWST)
Venue: Arts Lecture Room 8 (ALR8, 160), First Floor Arts Building, The University of Western Australia
Enquiries: marina.gerzic@uwa.edu.au

More details: https://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/witchcraft-and-communities-of-wonder-from-gervase-of-tilbury-to-the-malleus-maleficarum/

An Emotional History of Place: Alderley Edge and the Dead Man
Date: Monday 29 August 2022
Time: 6:00pm (AWST)
Venue: Arts Lecture Room 4 (ALR4, G60) Ground Floor Arts Building, The University of Western Australia
Enquiries: marina.gerzic@uwa.edu.au

More details: https://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/an-emotional-history-of-place-alderley-edge-and-the-dead-man/

Call for Expressions of Interest: ANZAMEMS Maddern-Crawford Network Event

Academic experiences, transitions, support, leadership

The ANZAMEMS Maddern-Crawford Network is delighted to host an in-person networking event for female/female-identifying/non-binary ANZAMEMS members.

This event aims to bring together academics at all career stages (full-time; part-time; casual; honorary; independent scholars; postgraduates) for a series of workshops and talks with the purpose of:
• Networking;
• Sharing career experiences and challenges;
• Learning about leadership;
• Creating support and mentoring opportunities for postgrads, ECRs, MCRs and senior scholars in MEMS disciplines.

The sessions will be arranged around themes including ‘experience’, ‘leadership’, ‘support’, and ‘transitions’ and will include ample opportunity for informal discussion.

Where: ACU St Patrick’s campus, East Melbourne, Victoria.
When: November 8-9, 2022.
Eligibility: Female/female-identifying/non-binary ANZAMEMS members at all career stages.
Support: A limited number of bursaries for flights and accommodation available for Australian and New Zealand participants without other forms of financial support. Lunch on both days, morning/afternoon tea on both days, and a dinner on the 8th November will be provided.

There are a limited number of places for this event.

Please send a short (one-page) CV together with a short expression of interest to Prof. Megan Cassidy-Welch by Monday 29 August 2022. Email: Megan.Cassidy-Welch@acu.edu.au

This event is generously supported by the Australian Catholic University’s Medieval and Early Modern Studies Program.

Forgotten Cistercians

Forgotten Cistercians

Contact: Jason R Crow (jason.crow@monash.edu)
Modality: In person
At the 2022 Cistercian & Monastic Studies Conference, several forgotten Cistercians, including Eutropious Proust, and Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz, and Sophia were re-introduced, proving and elucidating the broad influence of the Cistercian community outside of the twelfth-century boundaries that often delimit our research. Many intriguing Cistercians remain to be re-discovered. Continuing the effort, launched by Jean Traux last year, this panel seeks to further identify and spark interest in the lives and accomplishments of unnoticed Cistercians, regardless of their time period or location. Of particular interest, are those individuals, like Boccone and Lobkowitz, whose writings intersect theology and science.


The deadline for paper proposals is Thursday, 15 September 2022.
Attachments include: 
(1) Detailed list of sessions with descriptions and organizers’ contact information plus instructions 
(2) Paper Proposal Form
(3) Instructions for submitting paper proposals to the Congress website (from WMU)  The official Call for Papers for the Congress and complete list of Congress sessions can be found here: https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/inperson-sessions.

CFP: The Animate Cosmos in Cistercian Theology and Speculative Naturalism

The Animate Cosmos in Cistercian Theology and Speculative Naturalism

Contact: Jason R Crow (jason.crow@monash.edu)
Modality: In person
Spirituality of the world belongs to both creation theology and soteriology. Drawing on sources going back to the Timaeus, and on their lives with the Psalms, the Cistercians, dwelling in monastic microcosms, articulated Christological meaning for the world’s goodness in the lives of repentant sinners ranging from a world with beatific potential to a well-defined sense of the cosmos as good in itself and good for the soul that seeks divine unification. This panel seeks papers that explore what the cosmological understandings of world offer Cistercian theology, might offer contemporary philosophies of the environment, regardless of time period or location.

The deadline for paper proposals is Thursday, 15 September 2022.

Attachments include:
(1) Detailed list of sessions with descriptions and organizers’ contact information plus instructions
(2) Paper Proposal Form
(3) Instructions for submitting paper proposals to the Congress website (from WMU)
The official Call for Papers for the Congress and complete list of Congress sessions can be found here: https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/inperson-sessions.

CHRISTOPHER DAWSON CENTRE 31th ANNUAL SUMMER SCHOOL IN MEDIEVAL AND LATER LATIN

FR JOHN WALL CENTRE, NEW TOWN, HOBART

9 – 13 JANUARY, 2023

Latin is arguably the mother tongue of Europe. Its literature is immensely rich. In a sense it never died; original work continued to be written in Latin up to modern times. This course will offer a general introduction to Latin with particular emphasis on the enormous body medieval and later literature. We shall read original passages of Scripture, liturgy, history, theology and poetry, both secular and secular. There will also be an introduction to palaeography, including an opportunity to handle original medieval manuscripts. There will be a strong emphasis on the pronunciation of Latin in speech and music.

Designed for students of all standards, absolute beginners should purchase a self-instruction primer and work on the basics between now and the start of the course. Participants will never be embarrassed by their shaky Latin: the teaching method leaves the entire task of translation and exposition to the Lecturer. This approach has been useful to relative beginners as well as those who are more experienced. The instructor is Dr David Daintree.

Where: The Fr John Wall Community Library, Fr John Wall Centre, 31 Tower Road (Rear), New Town, 7008.

When: Monday 9 January to Friday 13 January 2023

Time: 9.00 am to 3.00 pm each day for five days

Cost: $200 (concession available). Tea and coffee will be available daily. Registrations are essential: email director@dawsoncentre.org.

THE PROGRAMME
There will be four lectures a day on each of the five days, from Monday 10 to Friday 14, starting at 9.00 am. There will be only one lecture after lunch each day, to free up the afternoons for private study.

Day 1 Liturgy and Scripture.

Day 2 Latin prose narrative: including passages from the Venerable Bede, St Brendan, Isidore of Seville, Robert Grosseteste

Day 3 Hymns, sequences and religious poetry, including works by St Ambrose, Venantius Fortunatus and St Thomas Aquinas .

Day 4 Secular Poetry, including songs from the Carmina Burana

Day 5 Theology and patristics: St Augustine, St Thomas Aquinas, St Benedict, St Patrick and Thomas a Kempis.

Any Latin Primer designed for self-instruction can be used, but F Kinchin Smith’s Teach Yourself Latin (out of print, but copies are available from www.abebooks.com) is particularly recommended. A free digitised version is available at https://archive.org/details/TeachYourselfLatin_201810/mode/2up.

Participants should bring both their grammar and a small dictionary to class each day.

All proceeds from this course go to the Christopher Dawson Centre (http://www.dawsoncentre.org).

For further information contact director@dawsoncentre.org.

Middle English Ekphrasis: Aesthetics and Socioeconomics in Late Medieval Poetry

Middle English Ekphrasis: Aesthetics and Socioeconomics in Late Medieval Poetry
An online seminar hosted by The University of Western Australia

Date: Wednesday 21 September 2022
Time: 4:00pm AWST / 6:00pm AEST
Venue: Online via Zoom, hosted by The University of Western Australia
Enquiries and to register: marina.gerzic@uwa.edu.au. Please register by Friday 16 September.

Ekphrasis has attracted a long history of scholarship as a pronounced form of aesthetic display in literary texts. Where major touchstones of scholarship on ekphrasis (Heffernan, 1993; Krieger, 1992) had previously been drawn to classical and modern materials, more recent work has begun to take stock of the peculiarity of medieval ekphrasis (Johnston, Knapp and Rouse, 2015). This paper explores some related avenues of enquiry about the nature, significance, and functions of ekphrasis in major Middle English poetry (Chaucer and Alliterative poetry, especially St Erkenwald and the Piers Plowman tradition). Surveying the vocabulary of cultural production available to late medieval poets, the paper suggests that much work on ekphrasis is theoretically antithetical to an understanding of patronage and artistic production in an age before ‘the Arts’ became defined. Instead, I focus on key passages of Middle English poetry to show how the trope of ekphrasis could be used to distinct effect in different texts: binding cultural production (both poetic and plastic) to the socio-economics of patronage; as a hostile, satirical form of verbal display; and as a mystery, a deliberate enigma, in the examples of St Erkenwald and John Metham’s Amoryus and Cleopes.

Chair
Dr Jane Vaughan (The University of Western Australia)

Speaker
Mike Rodman Jones is Associate Professor of English at the University of Nottingham (UK), and works on medieval and early modern literature. His second monograph is forthcoming in the Studies in Renaissance Literature Series with Boydell and Brewer. He spoke at the “Feeling (for) the Premodern” Symposium at The University of Western Australia in 2016; the paper was published in Exemplaria 30:3 (2018). Email: Mike.rodmanjones@nottingham.ac.uk.

This seminar is co-sponsored by the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medievial and Early Modern Studies, Inc (ANZAMEMS), the Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group, Inc, and the ARC Centre for Excellence for the History of Emotions.

For more information please see the event website.

Sydney University (SSSHARC) Medieval Event

SSSHARC Gilbert Fellow Professor Mariken Teeuwen discusses how digital methods reveal hidden evidence in the marginalia of early medieval manuscripts.

Details
4pm – 6pm
Wednesday 27 July 2022
Nelson Meers Foundation Auditorium
Chau Chak Wing Museum
University of Sydney

‘Practices of Annotating in Medieval Manuscripts’
This lecture will discuss how evidence in the margins of early medieval manuscripts has remained hidden for all but a very select group of researchers, and how it, now that more and more manuscripts are digitized and published in virtual libraries, has become a freely accessible source to peek into the mind of the medieval teacher/student/reader/user of books.

Professor Mariken Teeuwen (Leiden University / Huygens Institute, Netherlands) is a scholar of early medieval textuality whose work has centred on traditions of commentary, marginalia and annotation largely in the Carolingian era, dealing with such figures as Martianus Capella, and John Scottus Eriugena. She currently leads eCodicesNL, a project sponsored by the Dutch Royal Academy comprising a digital repository of medieval manuscripts in Dutch collections.

Chair: A/Professor Mark Byron (English, University of Sydney)

RSVP: this is an in-person event (so please register) but we hope to record the lecture for those who are unable to attend.

Online registration link: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/practices-of-annotating-in-medieval-manuscripts-tickets-383816083237

For more information please contact sssharc.research@sydney.edu.au or mark.byron@sydney.edu.au

Early Bird Registration extended for 2022 Society for the History of Emotions (SHE) Conference

Early bird registration has been extended until 25 June 2022 for ‘Going Places: Mobility, Migration, Exile, Space and Emotions’, the third biennial conference of the Society for the History of Emotions, to be held in Florence, Italy, 30 August to 2 September 2022.

After 25 June, all rates will increase by $60 AUD and will remain open until 10 July. Visit the SHE Website for further information and contacts, and make your booking before 25 June to avoid missing out!

Register here