Category Archives: publication

New member publication: Making the Medieval Relevant

Congratulations to current ANZAMEMS president Chris Jones on the publication of a new collection, Making the Medieval Relevant: How Medieval Studies Contribute to Improving our Understanding of the Present (De Gruyter, 2019) co-edited with Conor Kostick and Klaus Oschema. The volume also includes a contribution from ANZAMEMS member and Parergon Reviews Editor Hélène Sirantoine.  

When scholars discuss the medieval past, the temptation is to become immersed there, to deepen our appreciation of the nuances of the medieval sources through debate about their meaning. But the past informs the present in a myriad of ways and medievalists can, and should, use their research to address the concerns and interests of contemporary society.

This volume presents a number of carefully commissioned essays that demonstrate the fertility and originality of recent work in Medieval Studies. Above all, they have been selected for relevance.

Most contributors are in the earlier stages of their careers and their approaches clearly reflect how interdisciplinary methodologies applied to Medieval Studies have potential repercussions and value far beyond the boundaries of the Middle Ages. These chapters are powerful demonstrations of the value of medieval research to our own times, both in terms of providing answers to some of the specific questions facing humanity today and in terms of much broader
considerations.

Taken together, the research presented here also provides readers with confidence in the fact that Medieval Studies cannot be neglected without a great loss to the understanding of what it means to be human.

Making the Medieval Relevant is available for open-access download here: https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/489086. Open access is supported by funding from the British Academy, the Mediävistenverband e.V., the University of Canterbury (NZ) and the Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany).  The book will be discussed on the Pat Kenny show on Irish radio network Newstalk, which will later be released as a podcast.

ANZAMEMS members wishing to promote their research through the ANZAMEMS newsletter are invited to email the editor, Lisa Rolston.

Call for History of Emotions Manuscript Proposals

Announcing a new series on the history of emotions, published by Bloomsbury and edited by Peter Stearns and Susan Matt.

Editorial Board: Rob Boddice, Pia Campeggiani, Angelika Messner, Javier Moscoso, Charles Zika

We are seeking proposals for monographs which explore emotions in history. We seek to create a truly international series, with works on feelings from across the globe, from the ancient world to the present. We really hope to use the series to promote varied and imaginative work in this growing scholarly field. If interested, please send a short précis to pstearns@gmu.edu or smatt@weber.edu.

New member publication: New Saints in Late-Mediaeval Venice

Congratulations to ANZAMEMS member Karen McCluskey on the publication of her new book, New Saints in Late-Mediaeval Venice, 1200–1500: a typological study (Routledge, 2019).

This book focuses on the comparatively unknown cults of new saints in late-mediaeval Venice. These new saints were near-contemporary citizens who were venerated by their compatriots without official sanction from the papacy. In doing so, the book uncovers a sub-culture of religious expression that has been overlooked in previous scholarship.

The study highlights a myriad of hagiographical materials, both visual and textual, created to honour these new saints by members of four different Venetian communities: The Republican government; the monastic orders, mostly Benedictine; the mendicant orders; and local parishes. By scrutinising the hagiographic portraits described in painted vita panels, written vitae, passiones, votive images, sermons and sepulchre monuments, as well as archival and historical resources, the book identifies a specifically Venetian typology of sanctity tied to the idiosyncrasies of the city’s site and history.

By focusing explicitly on local typological traits, the book produces an intimate and complex portrait of Venetian society and offers a framework for exploring the lived religious experience of late-mediaeval societies beyond the lagoon. As a result, it will be of keen interest to scholars of Venice, lived religion, hagiography, mediaeval history and visual culture.

For more information including table of contents please see https://www.routledge.com/New-Saints-in-Late-Mediaeval-Venice-12001500-A-Typological-Study/McCluskey/p/book/9781138478008

ANZAMEMS members wishing to promote their research through the ANZAMEMS newsletter are invited to email the editor, Lisa Rolston

CFP Viator: Looking Ahead: Global Encounters in the North Atlantic, ca. 350–1300

A special dossier in Viator

Co-edited by Nahir Otaño Gracia, Nicole Lopez-Jantzen, and Erica Weaver

In the last few years, several urgent interventions have begun to reshape medieval studies as a more capacious and inclusive field. Scholars such as Geraldine Heng, Monica Green, and Michael Gomez have expanded our understanding of the multifaceted interactions between and among Africa, Asia, Europe, and elsewhere, while Adam Miyashiro and Mary Rambaran-Olm have urged us to reassess the North Atlantic in particular. Traditionally, scholars have tended to work within national borders or to focus on how North Atlantic cultures changed the rest of the globe rather than how they were themselves changed by global interactions, with drastic consequences for our field––especially for our earliest periods.

In order to continue these important conversations and to expand what our scholarship can look like going forward, this special essay cluster seeks to provide a platform for early-career scholars to propose new critical directions for the study of the early medieval North Atlantic, broadly encompassing ca. 350–1300. We thus invite short, rigorous interventions (2000–3500 words each), in the model of the popular conference genre of “lightning talks.” In particular, we seek imaginative new work that expands the contours of early medieval studies and challenges, or transgresses, its standard disciplinary, temporal, and linguistic boundaries. Following the example set by the IONA: Islands of the North Atlantic conferences, we reject the unproductive disciplinary divides that have separated the study of England, Wales, Ireland, Francia, Scandinavia, the Iberian Peninsula, Africa, and even the Mediterranean both from each other and from points further afield along the Atlantic rim and beyond. We also aim to break down the divisions that have artificially separated Late Antiquity and the early and high Middle Ages. We are intentionally leaving this call for papers very broad, because we come from the perspective that the global does not exclude the local, and vice-versa. Moreover, the insular can be archipelagic. We welcome essays that bring together North Atlantic and Mediterranean Studies, or that read what has been seen as national literature from a transnational perspective.

In the spirit of emerging from our own linguistic silos and in Viator’s usual practice, we thus welcome work from scholars writing in English, Spanish, and French. Additionally, we particularly invite work from graduate students, postdocs, independent scholars, and members of the precariat as well as contributions that are explicitly feminist, queer, anti-racist, and decolonial. We would like to be as inclusive as possible, so please contact us if you have any questions.

Short abstracts of around 200 words are due by December 2 to ViatorIssue@gmail.com, with essays to be submitted by January 15.

CFP Yearbook of the Spanish and Portuguese Society for English Renaissance Studies

SEDERI welcomes ARTICLES, NOTES and REVIEWS for its next issue (nº 30) to be published in Autumn 2020. SEDERI, Yearbook of the Spanish and Portuguese Society for English Renaissance Studies, is an annual publication devoted to current criticism and scholarship on Early Modern English Studies. It is peer-reviewed by external readers, following a double-blind policy. It is published in paper and online, in open-access.

QUALITY ASSESSMENT AND INDEXING
SEDERI is included in the Web of Science, the Arts & Humanities Citation Index, the MLA International Bibliography, Scopus, EBSCO Host, ProQuest, ERIH+, Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (ABELL), Dialnet plus, The Spanish Repository for Science and Technology (RECYT), CIRC, CARHUS+, DICE (CSIC-CINDOC-Aneca), Latindex, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. SEDERI’s scientific and editorial excellence has been accredited continually by the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT) since 2009. It meets 100% of the scientific requirements established by Latindex and DICE-CINDOC. The Italian National Agency for the Assessment of Research (ANVUR) has ranked SEDERI Yearbook as an «A» journal.

AREAS OF INTEREST
Early Modern English Literature
Early Modern English History and Culture
Early Modern English Language
Restoration English Studies
Early Modern Anglo-Spanish and cross-cultural studies
Early Modern Anglo-Portuguese cross-cultural studies

EDITORIAL PROCESS
Submissions will be sent to two readers for review, following a double blind, peer-review policy. In case of disagreement, a third report will be decisive. If the paper is accepted for publication, the authors may be asked to consider the readers’ suggestions and to bring it into line with our style sheet. The contributions, in their final form, will go through copyediting, layout, and proofreading. Once published, the authors will receive a copy of the issue in which their work is included.

SUBMISSION INFORMATION
Time from submission to decision: 3-4 months
From decision to publication: 6-9 months
Number of readers prior to decision: 2-3
Articles/notes submitted per year: 20-25
Articles/notes published per year: 6-12
Information updated on July 2019

Submissions should be sent through the SEDERI online submission platform (https://recyt.fecyt.es/index.php/SEDY/about/submissions). If you are not a user of the SEDERI platform yet, you will need to register as a new user before logging in. All submissions should be in Word/RTF format. Please omit any personal information in the file of your paper and make sure the file properties do not show your name.

Deadline for submission: 31 October 2019

For further details please download the attached CFP and style sheet:

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Highlights from the Parergon archives: Women and Property

We asked members of Parergon‘s Early Career Committee to tell us about a Parergon article that really stood out for them and why they found it valuable for their research. In this post, Emma Simpson discusses Patricia Crawford’s ‘Women and Property: Women as Property’, Parergon 19.1 (2002), pp. 151-171 (DOI: doi.org/10.1353/pgn.2002.0086)

Those of us interested in early modern women owe a great debt to Patricia Crawford. The ANZAMEMS Crawford-Maddern network speaks to her personal legacy, one that builds on her extensive work in the field encompassing numerous monographs, articles, and edited collections.

Personally, Crawford and Gowing’s Women’s Worlds in Seventeenth-Century England was an early introduction to research around early modern women, and I returned to Crawford’s work when beginning my dissertation. Though my focus has since shifted from women writers in a male-dominated genre to representations of women within that genre itself, Crawford’s work still influences the historicist approach I take in my work. Indeed, she remains important across disciplines, and her 2002 Parergon article “Women and Property: Woman as Property” is no exception.

Here, Crawford explores how early modern women functioned as property, what rights they had to property and freedom, and how this affected their ability to act autonomously. She suggests that “three interlocking variables affected a woman’s right to property”: the “status” of women as a category, the “complex system of jurisdictions” which comprised early modern law, and the definition of property itself. But in outlining difficulties for women in the early modern period, Crawford also carefully establishes the ways in which these women could and did “circumvent the restrictions of the common law” (154). She further contextualises her important discussion of gendered restrictions in the period with reference to shifting political and class hierarchies.

Though interested largely in the eighteenth century, “Women and Property: Women as Property” serves as a useful introduction not only to important work on early modern women, but also as an introduction to Crawford and her broader work, as one of Australia’s important voices on women in the early modern period.

Parergon can be accessed via Project MUSE (from Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). For more information on the current issue and on submitting manuscripts for consideration, please visit https://parergon.org/.

Highlights from the Parergon archives: Rationality and renaissance magic

We asked members of Parergon‘s Early Career Committee to tell us about a Parergon article that really stood out for them and why they found it valuable for their research. In this post, Julie Davies of the University of Melbourne relflects on Gregory W. Dawes, ‘The Rationality of Renaissance Magic’, Parergon 30.2 (2013), pp. 33–58. (DOI: 10.1353/pgn.2013.0132)

I was very excited to read Dawes’s article exploring the rationality of magical beliefs from a philosophical perspective. The question of belief is complex and historians of witchcraft and magic often have to balance the ideal of evaluating their subjects according to the values and beliefs of their time with the scepticism of both contemporaneous critics and modern readers. While it is sometimes appropriate to reduce engagement with supernatural themes to ignorance, credulity, fantasy, delusion or outright fraud, hastily, unconsciously or consistently presuming such would significantly distort our historical perspective. As Dawes points out, even if certain accounts of magical phenomena are known to have been completely made up, many were unquestionably intended to be plausible fictions. Understanding the rationality behind such beliefs is, therefore, key to understanding both believers and deceivers.

Dawes gives an overview explanations for magical thinking from a range of disciplines including anthropology, sociology and psychology. However, his main discussion focuses on the different epistemological levels of rational belief. Dawes leads the discussion beyond the typical historical focus on the background beliefs which supported and promoted beliefs about magic and rendered them rationally defensible. He also explores how Renaissance belief in magic was formed on the basis of evidence and other cognitive mechanisms, and how it’s weakness, from the modern perspective, arises from its failure to employ collectively rational procedures. Unlike the modern scientific community who attempt to overcome biases through replicability and verification, magical practitioners tended to value secrecy, limiting the spread of knowledge to like-minded initiates or, as in the case of controversial figures such as Paracelsus, actively maintaining independence from established institutions.

As a result, Dawes not only provides a very useful and detailed introduction to the philosophical theory of knowledge production, magical or otherwise, it also provides insight into the value shift which arguably represents the biggest hurdle to our own objective engagement with the magical past.

Parergon can be accessed via Project MUSE (from Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). For more information on the current issue and on submitting manuscripts for consideration, please visit https://parergon.org/

Call for Special Issues: Emotions: History, Culture, Society

Emotions: History, Culture, Society, a journal of the Society for the History of Emotions, is pleased to announce its call for proposals for special issues. The next special issue is anticipated to be published in the second half of 2021.

Multidisciplinary research increasingly reveals both the historical and cultural dimensions of the modern concept of ‘emotions’, and the significant extent to which emotions, passions and feelings help constitute history, society and culture. Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS) is a bi-annual peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal dedicated to understanding the emotions as culturally and temporally-situated phenomena, and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience, societies, cultures and environments. We welcome theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. We aim to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualised and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices. We are interested in multidisciplinary approaches (both qualitative and quantitative), from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines. We also invite papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts; and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. Emotions also accepts theoretically-informed and reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

We now invite proposals for themed special issues that fall under this remit. Themed issues contain up to ten essays with a maximum word count of 60,000 words for the whole issue. Essays should bring a range of disciplinary or methodological/theoretical perspectives on the topic. The guest editor is responsible for setting the theme and drawing up the criteria for the essays.

Proposals should include a synopsis explaining the theme and how it contributes to the aims of the journal; titles and brief abstracts for each proposed essay, and short biographies of the editors and proposed authors.

The deadline for proposal submissions is 15 Dec 2019. Submissions should be sent to editemotions@gmail.com

The Special Issue will be due with editors in November 2020. Publication, of both the issue and individual essays, is subject to peer review arranged by the journal editors.

Editors
Katie Barclay, University of Adelaide
Andrew Lynch, University of Western Australia
Giovanni Tarantino, Florence

Parergon 36.1 preview: Mealtimes and authority in the Book of Margery Kempe

We asked contributors to the current issue of Parergon to give us some additional insights into their research and the inspirations for their articles. In this post, Hwanhee Park, assistant professor at the Department of English Language and Literature at Kyung Hee University, South Korea, talks about “Mealtime Sanctity: the Social and Devotional Functions of Mealtimes in The Book of Margery Kempe” (DOI:10.1353/pgn.2019.0002).

My research focuses on the literature of late medieval England, particularly texts written about or by women that deal with education and self-development. I focus on women negotiating and manipulating their surroundings to aim for greater power and acknowledgement. In that process, I argue, establishing an outwardly visible characters of authority for others to see and accept becomes important — perhaps even more important than the actual interior virtues.

Margery Kempe was well aware of the importance of such visible characters of authority. As a secular woman/mystic who never bothered to remove the slash in between, she was in a tricky position to be acknowledged as a religious authority, either officially or by popular agreement. But she could find ways to make the social norms and expectations of her time — such as mealtimes and their social functions — work for her unconventional circumstances.

My article reassesses the mealtime scenes in The Book of Margery Kempe and argues that mealtimes enable Margery Kempe to claim greater spiritual authority by providing a public space for showcasing her devotion. I got the idea for this article as I was attempting to develop a previous article on Margery Kempe I had written in 2014. In that paper, I argued that Margery Kempe utilizes the ideal womanhood described in conduct books to add to her authority. Since conduct books deal with eating habits and behaviors (to such an extent that a well-known conduct book, Le Ménagier de Paris, has a huge section on meal planning and recipes added to it), I thought that the few but memorable depictions of mealtimes in The Book of Margery Kempe deserved special attention. As I revisited the text, I realized that the mealtimes are important as a stage for performing what her society deemed as good manners. Since medieval mealtimes demonstrate social hierarchy and a sense of community and harmony, Margery could use them as a stage to assert her position within the orthodox circle at a time of religious dissent.

I’m continuing my research on medieval women establishing spiritual authority by making themselves visible to the public eye. My current project goes back to the thirteenth century and to Ancrene Wisse, a guidebook for beginner anchoresses. I argue that the anchoress’s maidservants are essential in making the anchoress an authoritative figure, because of their labour made visible to the local community. This project will expand to a larger one focusing on women’s social labour in medieval England. In that, I hope to return to Margery Kempe and her fascinating career again.

Parergon can be accessed via Project MUSE (from Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). For more information on the current issue and on submitting manuscripts for consideration, please visit https://parergon.org/

 

Call for Proposals: Parergon Special Issues 2022

The journal Parergon, in print since 1971, regularly produces one open issue and one themed issue annually. Recent and forthcoming themed issues include:

  • 2018, 35.2 Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Space: A Global Perspective, guest-edited by Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Helene Sirantoine
  • 2019, 36.2 Practice, Performance, and Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Cultural Heritage, guest-edited by Jane-Heloise Nancarrow and Alicia Marchant
  • 2020, 37.2 Foreign Bodies: The Exotic, the monstrous, and the medical in early modern art in Melbourne, guest-edited by Anne Dunlop and Cordelia Warr
  • 2021, 38.2 Children and War, guest-edited by Katie Barclay, Dianne Hall and Dolly Mackinnon

We now call for proposals for future themed issues, specifically for 2022 (39.2). Themed issues contain up to ten essays, plus the usual reviews section. The guest editor is responsible for setting the theme and drawing up the criteria for the essays.

Proposals should be submitted by 1 October 2019 to the Editor, Susan Broomhall at susan.broomhall@uwa.edu.au

The detailed call, including information on proposal requirements, timelines and the editorial process, can be downloaded below.

Parergon publishes articles on all aspects of medieval and early modern studies, from early medieval through to the eighteenth century, and including the reception and influence of medieval and early modern culture in the modern world. We are particularly interested in research which takes new approaches and crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Parergon asks its authors to achieve international standards of excellence. Articles should be substantially original, advance research in the field, and have the potential to make a significant contribution to the critical debate.

Parergon has an Open Access policy. Authors retain their own copyright, rather than transferring it to Parergon/ANZAMEMS; and can make the “accepted version” of their article freely available on the Web.