Category Archives: publication

Parergon 37.1 preview: Taboo or Magic Practice?

We asked contributors to the current issue of Parergon to give us some additional insights into their research and the inspirations for their articles. In this post, Andrea Maraschi at the University of Bari, Italy, discusses ‘Taboo or Magic Practice? Cannibalism as Identity Marker for Giants and Human Heroes in Medieval Iceland’. DOI: 10.1353/pgn.2020.0056

My name is Andrea, and I am currently teaching Medieval History at the University of Bari, in Italy. My research career started at the University of Bologna with studies on food habits in medieval times, but I soon realized that I did not want to commit to one field of studies only. My passion for medieval society was growing fast, and when in 2014 I won a postdoctoral fellowship from the University of Iceland, I began to examine connections between food and magic practice in the medieval North. This article represents one of the first results of the wonderful working experience I had in Reykjavík, and it is focused on the role of cannibalism in Old Norse literature. Now, cannibalism had long intrigued me as an extreme response to hunger and famine in the Middle Ages, and – as such – I used to associate it with desperation and survival instinct. Reading the Old Norse legendary sagas, however, it struck me that cannibalism was described as a marker of Otherness and as a response to survival instinct only in the case of certain peculiar creatures: trolls, that is, caricatured representations of the uncivilized. However, the human protagonists of the sagas practice cannibalism not for the sake of survival, but to absorb magical powers from the eaten: to them, anthropophagy is a prestigious form of knowledge which is handed down from father to son.

Not all scholars agree as to the usefulness of legendary sagas as sources to understand the mentality and culture of saga writers: after all, fornaldarsögur abound with strange creatures and supernatural elements. This nonetheless, in my article I argue that scenes of cannibalism suggest that there is more than mere fantasy at the heart of such stories. Giants symbolized the idea of “barbarian”: they were huge, awkward, they lived in caves or small huts, they did not know politics, they ate human beings. In other words, they were the antithesis of civilization, but of a historically reliable idea of civilization. Indeed, the Old Norse trolls ate horses as well. Horsemeat was a critical bone of contention at the time of the conversion of Iceland, and the Church often associated its consumption with pagan rituals. The Old Norse trolls may be, then, caricatured representations of the pagan “uncivilized” past, from the perspective of the Christian saga authors. However, there also emerges a “civilized” and dignified version of cannibalism which was practiced by the human élite of the sagas, according to the very ancient principles of “sympathetic magic”. This form of anthropophagy is no less interesting in historical and cultural terms: many historical sources from the late medieval North (handbooks of magic, leechbooks, etc.) show that the notions of sympathy (“like produces like”) were applied in the real world, and not only in the fictional world of the sagas.

This analysis of magical and non-magical cannibalism in fornaldarsögur was one of the triggers that induced me to write a book on the application and circulation of the laws of sympathy in the Middle Ages, between magic, religion and science, which is currently in course of publication: Similia similibus curantur. Cannibalismo, grafofagia, e “magia” simpatetica nel Medioevo (500-1500), Spoleto: Cisam, 2020.

Parergon can be accessed via Project MUSE (from Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). For more information on the current issue and on submitting manuscripts for consideration, please visit https://parergon.org/

Parergon 37.1 preview: Reframing Feminine Modesty, Complaint, and Desire in the More Family

We asked contributors to the current issue of Parergon to give us some additional insights into their research and the inspirations for their articles. In this post, Kelly Peihopa at the University of Newcastle, Australia, discusses ‘Reframing Feminine Modesty, Complaint, and Desire in the More Family’. DOI: 10.1353/pgn.2020.0003

Kelly Peihopa began this article as her major work for part of her BA degree in the history discipline. This earlier work focused on the education of the women of Thomas More’s immediate circle, and how the More women worked within patriarchal restrictions to further their education and reputations. She became fascinated with how some early modern women overcame certain patriarchal restrictions by working through the channels of patriarchy, which enabled them to continue their education and protect their reputations; something that was unique to the More women during the early 1500s.

Because of a fascination with the More women’s history, Kelly began to work towards an honours thesis in English. She developed her paper into a wider argument to include themes such familial, religious and modesty rhetoric, as well as complaint and petitions, which were specific ways More women used their feminine voice to enable a ‘safe passage’ for their works. This research was extended to include More’s traceable women ancestors with extant literary evidence during the early modern period, which found a literary legacy was sustained by the More women for several generations. Upon earning first class honours, she was encouraged to turn her thesis into an academic paper. Once again, the work was researched anew, refurbished and reframed over several months (and with more editing than she’d like to admit), to eventually become what it is today. Her article establishes how one family of women, through the legacy of their forbear, were able to continue to pursue a humanist education and publish and profess their religion through their works. They successfully performed this under the guise of genres, such as translation, letters and religious works, through exploiting rhetorical arguments and always navigating modesty and familial tropes to frame their work. Her work also found that without the ‘protection’ of a humanist circle, their work diminished. By considering the textual oeuvre of the More women as a chronological whole, something that is not usually considered in Morean women scholarship, the far-reaching literary legacy established by Thomas More can be appreciated as a unique achievement among early modern women’s writing.

Kelly became interested in early modern women’s writing after working as a research assistant for the Early Modern Women Research Network (EMWRN), under Rosalind Smith and Patricia Pender at the University of Newcastle. Her PhD dissertation is titled ‘Tudor Women’s Prison Literature: Reception, Circulation, Attribution’, which focuses on women’s prison writing which has been omitted from the prison canon because of the variety of genres and modes used, and the volume of dubious or contested works. Kelly also works as a research assistant for the Gender Research Network at the University of Newcastle. She has published creative nonfiction articles on domestic violence in Australia in Meanjin (‘The Hands of a Woman,’ Spring 2018) and Sūdō Journal (‘Becoming a Statistic,’ 1: 2019), and in 2020, co-edited a digital edition of Mary Wroth’s Urania manuscript with Paul Salzman on EMWRN’S digital archive, The Material Cultures of Early Modern Women.

Parergon can be accessed via Project MUSE (from Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). For more information on the current issue and on submitting manuscripts for consideration, please visit https://parergon.org/

Parergon 37.1 preview: A Clerical View of Gender in Twelfth-Century Flanders: The Voice of Lambert of Ardres

We asked contributors to the current issue of Parergon to give us some additional insights into their research and the inspirations for their articles. In this post, Yongku Cha, Professor of History at Chung-Ang University, South Korea, discusses ‘A Clerical View of Gender in Twelfth-Century Flanders: The Voice of Lambert of Ardres’. DOI: 10.1353/pgn.2020.0000

I am currently a professor in the Department of History at Chung-Ang University in Seoul, Korea. I earned my PhD in medieval history from the University of Passau, Germany. I have published, among others, “A Case Study of the Conflict between Husbands and Wives in the Twelfth Century: Focusing on Arnold and Beatrice of Guînes-Ardres’’ (Journal of Western Medieval History 32 (2013): 107–134), “The Relationship between Fathers and Sons in the Twelfth Century: Baldwin of Guines and His Eldest Son” (Journal of Family History 39/2 (2014): 87-100), and “Women, Marriage, and Cultural Transmission: The Marriage of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto II and the Byzantine Princess Theophano (972)” (The Historical Review of Soong Sil University 37(2017), 391-423). My main research and teaching interests focus on the gender and men’s history in Medieval Europe.

My article published in Parergon 37.1 looks at the twelfth-century view on gender, focusing on the family chronicle of Guînes and Ardres (the Historia comitum Ghisnensium) written by Lambert, who worked as a household chaplain in the church of Ardres. There is still relatively little published scholarship on gender constructions of the secular aristocracy; even though Lambert is relatively well known for offering a richly detailed account of an aristocratic family in twelfth-century Flanders, there has been no research revealing his views on gender and masculinities. His duties and experiences enabled him to have personal interactions with aristocratic women and men. These secular interests and responsibilities provide insight into the aristocratic gender system such as marriage, sex, family life, conjugal relations, or affections. By disclosing Lambert’s ideas about male and female gender categories, this article will contribute to scholarship on the studies of femininities, masculinities, and gender construction in the twelfth century aristocratic family.

I have conducted much of my research by crossing traditional disciplinary boundaries and taking new approaches – these are also Parergon’s aims –, which allow an in-depth understanding of the mutual interactions between family strategies of the aristocracy and gender roles in the twelfth century. Lambert’s depictions of marriage, female and male virtues and moral weaknesses, variations in gender stereotypes, and the performance of masculinities provide interesting clues for understanding clerical ideas of medieval gender identities. Moreover, Lambert emphasizes the reciprocal relationship between men and women; readers would recognize that women have been deeply involved in the process of forming masculinities.

Based on women’s and gender studies, my research will continue to investigate modern political discourses and representations or ‘deliberate’ misrepresentations of medieval women. I intend to publish other papers on this subject, specifically considering the national appropriations of the medieval past which make use of medieval women to support nationalist ideologies in Germany, France, and Italy during the 1920s and the 1930s.

Parergon can be accessed via Project MUSE (from Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). For more information on the current issue and on submitting manuscripts for consideration, please visit https://parergon.org/

Highlights from the Parergon Archives: Words as Weapons

We asked members of Parergon‘s Early Career Committee to tell us about a Parergon article that stood out for them and why they found it valuable for their research. In this post, Francesca Battista discusses Kathleen Neal’s ‘Words as Weapons in the Correspondence of Edward I with Llywelyn ap Gruffydd’, Parergon 30.1 (2013), pp. 51-71 [DOI: 10.1353/pgn.2013.0051]

The one-day workshop on Letter Writing in the Middle Ages, held at the Bush House, King’s College London in 2019 and organized by Simon Thomas Parsons, Thomas W. Smith and Anaïs Waag, not only offered a great opportunity to be engaged in interesting debates on medieval epistolary culture, but it also allowed me to meet brilliant scholars and hear about their meaningful work. A stimulating exchange of ideas after the conference with one of the attendees, Amanda McVitty, and the paper presented by Kathleen Neal, introduced me to valuable scholarship on dictamen and related areas of study from Australia and New Zealand, which was unknown to me. Neal’s article that I am going to discuss in this post is part of this story. Her research method represents a great source of inspiration for the dictaminal research I am conducting.

The influence of ars dictaminis on the shaping of chancery style in England was long ago recognized by Kantorowicz, Denholm-Young, and more recently pointed out by Camargo, Richardson, and Grévin, among others. However, the investigation of the ways in which from the thirteenth century dictamen started to be used as a royal political communication tool is still not fully explored.

Neal’s article provides a relevant contribution to the field of investigation, offering a compelling reading of the letters exchanged between Edward I of England and Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of Wales, during the time period between the Anglo-Welsh wars (1276-77, 1282-83). This correspondence is read drawing attention to its dictaminal shape and interconnected political intent. Furthermore, it also illustrates a method based on the study of the epistolary drafting process for interpreting royal letters, not as “relics of a well-developed medieval bureaucracy,” but rather “as episodes of strategic communication” (p. 52).

The article concentrates on a single letter which is offered as an example of how Edward I’s letters functioned as rhetorical political artifacts in connection to the Anglo-Welsh struggle. It is a royal reply of 1280 to one or two of Llywelyn’s letters which were concerned, above all, with the issue of the possession of Arwystli region. The Treaty of Aberconwy of 1277, which marked the capitulation of Llywelyn to Edward I, left open the Welsh dispute over this land. As a result, rights to it were claimed equally by the Prince of Wales and Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn, ally of the king. In his letters addressed to the king, Llewelyn complains because the king was not able to settle this dispute in his Parliament. Such criticism resulted in an indirect aggression to the heart of Edward I’s monarchy.

Neal brilliantly shows how Edward’s reply appears to be a rhetorical means of legitimization of the manner of power execution in the hands of the superior party. Accordingly, for example, in the salutatio the address terms of “beloved and faithful”, which were used in line with the Anglo-Norman epistolary practices rather than on the basis of those of the Welsh chancery, stress the Prince of Wales’ subordination to the king and also show who “was willing to conduct their discussion” (p. 61).

Likewise, the hypertrophic narratio would suggest “that a hostile reception was anticipated” and indicates “how important it was in royal and Chancery circles that an English construction of the situation be articulated” (p. 61). It could be also argued that the length of the narratio is an especially significant aspect to be considered as a clear transgression of dictaminal norms. Handbooks of letter writing prescribed that narration had to be brief and concise, and English artes dictandi were not an exception. One of the most relevant merits of this article is its attentive examination of the editorial work involved in the production of this letter. Edward’s letter survives as a draft and all the draft’s changes and deletions represent a conscious use of language which is itself political. Notably, despite the fact that their consideration is necessary for a complete reading of the letter, they had been neglected in previous research. An edition and a translation of the letter, along with the annotation of the deletions and additions in the apparatus, are for the first time provided in the appendix of this article.

In conclusion, as shown by Neal, royal letters extant in the form of draft or not, can be regarded as a fruitful place for the investigation of the monarchy’s dictaminal construction of power. This applies to 13th century Britain, as in the specific case of this paper, but it could be extended to a European level to other royal chanceries. For the richness of its investigation, this article represents a wide range of scholarly interests. It can be especially recommended to historians of medieval Britain and Europe, specialists of dictamen, scholars of political communication and kingship, and researchers of medieval textuality and scribal activity.

Parergon can be accessed via Project MUSE (from Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). For more information on the current issue and on submitting manuscripts for consideration, please visit https://parergon.org/

New member publication: Feeling Exclusion

Congratulations to ANZAMEMS member Charles Zika on the publication of a new collection, Feeling Exclusion: Religious Conflict, Exile and Emotions in Early Modern Europe (Routledge, 2019) co-edited with Giovanni Tarantino. The volume features a number of essays by ANZAMEMS members.

Feeling Exclusion: Religious Conflict, Exile and Emotions in Early Modern Europe investigates the emotional experience of exclusion at the heart of the religious life of persecuted and exiled individuals and communities in early modern Europe.

Between the late fifteenth and early eighteenth centuries an unprecedented number of people in Europe were forced to flee their native lands and live in a state of physical or internal exile as a result of religious conflict and upheaval. Drawing on new insights from history of emotions methodologies, Feeling Exclusion explores the complex relationships between communities in exile, the homelands from which they fled or were exiled, and those from whom they sought physical or psychological assistance. It examines the various coping strategies religious refugees developed to deal with their marginalization and exclusion, and investigates the strategies deployed in various media to generate feelings of exclusion through models of social difference, that questioned the loyalty, values, and trust of “others”.

Accessibly written, divided into three thematic parts, and enhanced by a variety of illustrations, Feeling Exclusion is perfect for students and researchers of early modern emotions and religion.

ANZAMEMS members wishing to promote their research through the ANZAMEMS newsletter are invited to email the editor, Lisa Rolston.

Parergon 37.1

Parergon volume 37.1, featuring eight scholarly articles and 50 reviews and short notices, has now been published on all platforms except Project MUSE, where it will appear in July. 

Print copies will be posted to ANZAMEMS members from mid-June. The contents of the volume are posted below:

Download (PDF, Unknown)

New Member Publication: The Miraculous and the Writing of Crusade Narrative

Congratulations to ANZAMEMS member Beth C. Spacey on the publication of her new book, The Miraculous and the Writing of Crusade Narrative (Boydell Press, 2020).

The medieval Latin Christian narratives of the crusades are replete with references to miracles, visions and signs. Mysterious white-clad knights lead crusader armies to victory in battle, Christ and the saints offer guidance in visions, and great signs are seen in the skies. However, despite the frequent appearance of these themes in the sources, and the evident importance of these ideas to the narratives which describe them, scholars have often analysed examples in isolation.

This book represents the first far-reaching examination of the miraculous in crusade narrative, offering an analysis of the role of miracles, marvels, visions, dreams, signs and augury in narratives of the crusades of 1096 to 1204 and produced between c.1099 and c.1250. It argues that the miraculous and its related themes represented a powerful tool for the authors of crusade narrative because of its ability to convey divine agency and will, ideas which were central to the belief held among Latin Christian contemporaries that crusade was divinely inspired and spiritually salvific. Overall, the volume demonstrates how the authors of crusade narrative drew upon various intellectual authorities on the miraculous in the service of their narrative agendas and reveals how the use of the miraculous changed as authors were forced to respond to the challenges of narrating crusade during this period.

ANZAMEMS members wishing to promote their research through the ANZAMEMS newsletter are invited to email the editor, Lisa Rolston.

CFP New Chaucer Studies: Pedagogy and Profession

The mission of the New Chaucer Society is to “provide a forum for teachers and
scholars of Geoffrey Chaucer and his age.” As the working conditions of those
teachers and scholars change, this forum needs to expand to reflect those changes.
For this reason, NCS is happy to announce the launch of a new on-line venue,
New Chaucer Studies: Pedagogy and Profession, hosted on the New Chaucer Society
website. This peer-reviewed, open access site will offer brief essays on teaching,
service, and institutional environments/ cultures.

We would like to invite submissions for this new project from a wide range of
contributors, including K-12 educators and independent scholars. We are
particularly interested in essays that are immediately concerned with usefulness —
to readers across institutions and non-institutional settings. Some areas for
inquiry might include the following: teaching medieval literature in a Gen Ed
curriculum and/ or in a K-12 context; recruiting graduate students for the study
of medieval literature; the impact of curricular change on medieval courses; issues
of hiring, tenure and promotion; the workings of professional organizations,
journals, and conferences; graduate training for a shrinking number of academic
jobs; outreach to the public and to colleagues in other disciplines; strategies for
equity and inclusivity in teaching, recruiting, and hiring; strategies for addressing
or rectifying institutional constraints (budgets, criteria for tenure, etc.). We also
welcome collaborative essays or responses unified around a single topic.

We are now seeking contributions for Issue 2, #MeToo, and Issue 3, Open
Topic. Please submit essays of 3000 words to ncs.pedagogyandprofession@gmail.com by September 1, 2020 for consideration in Issue 2, to appear March 15, 2021, or Issue 3, to appear July 1, 2021.

CFP: Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques

Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques (HRRH) has established a well-deserved reputation for publishing high quality articles of wide-ranging interest for over forty years. The journal, which publishes articles in both English and French, is committed to exploring history in an interdisciplinary framework and with a comparative focus. Historical approaches to art, literature, and the social sciences; the history of mentalities and intellectual movements; the terrain where religion and history meet: these are the subjects to which Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques is devoted.

Contributions are invited from all fields of intellectual-cultural history and the history of religion and mentalities.

Some specific themes include:
• Music history
• Social policies and societal change (including studies with a comparative focus)
• Material culture and emotions
• Architectural and garden history
• Small businesses
• Colonial/imperial studies

Manuscript Submission
The editorial board welcomes submissions for publication in English or French. Authors should submit articles as email attachments, formatted as Microsoft Word or Rich Text Format files. Please note that all correspondence will take place via email. Send submissions and complete contact information to the editor, Elizabeth Macknight at e.macknight@abdn.ac.uk.

Have other questions? Please refer to the various Berghahn Info for Authors pages for general information and guidelines including topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors (www.berghahnjournals.com/historical-reflections).

Indexed in:
• Arts & Humanities Citation Index (Web of Science)
• Scopus
• Historical Abstracts
• ERIH PLUS

For a full listing of indices, please visit the website.

CFP eSharp Journal

eSharp, Issue 28 (Summer 2020), ‘Estrangement and Reconciliation’

Postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers are invited to submit an article for possible inclusion in the next issue of the eSharp journal on the theme of ‘Estrangement and Reconciliation’.

Deadlines:
Abstracts: Thursday, 6 February 2020
Full Paper: Monday, 30 March 2020

eSharp is an international online journal for postgraduate research in the Arts, Humanities, Social and Political Sciences and Education. Based at the University of Glasgow and run entirely by postgraduate students, it aims to provide a critical but supportive entry into the realm of academic publishing for emerging academics. Papers will be submitted to double-blind peer
review.

Estrangement and Reconciliation
The Oxford English Dictionary defines estrangement as ‘separation, withdrawal, alienation in feeling or affection’. It gives a number of meanings for reconciliation, including ‘the fact or condition of a person’s or humanity’s being reconciled with God’, ‘The action of restoring estranged persons or parties to friendship’, and ‘The action or act of bringing a thing or things to agreement, concord or harmony’. As the breadth of these definitions demonstrates, the experience of estrangement, and the struggle for reconciliation, are part of the universal human condition. Dealing with estrangement is not only a personal challenge for individuals, but a central concern in art and literature (playing a major role in movements such as romanticism, modernism and post-modernism), in education (where there is an increasing focus on teaching inter-personal skills and on pastoral care), and in politics (not only when responding to political and military conflicts, but also to issues such as migration and climate change). We would welcome proposals that explore the theme from the perspective of any of these disciplines, of any geographical location, and of any historical period. We particularly encourage proposals that are interdisciplinary, and that compare and contrast different approaches to achieving reconciliation. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

1) Estrangement due to exile, migration, environmental changes, border frontiers, seeking asylum, the condition of being a stranger.
2) Estrangement due to encounters with the arts, the representation of the known world or having been brought out of oneself, as well as experiences of the abject or the uncanny.
3) Estrangement due to breakdown of personal relationships, the struggle to form such relationships (e.g. among minorities such as LGBTQIA+ people and those with autism), as well as physical, linguistic, social, cultural, ethnic, political and military divisions.
4) Spiritual estrangement due to guilt, the loss of religious faith, separation from nature, a feeling (as in existentialist fiction and philosophy) that one is an ‘outsider’ in one’s native land.
5) The process of individual and collective acceptance of the new identities/selves/relationships borne of estrangement.

Requirements
We welcome contributions by postgraduate students working in any area of the Arts, Humanities, Social and Political Sciences or Education. We also accept submissions from postdoctoral researchers within one year of completing their PhD.

Please submit an abstract of 250-300 words summarising your argument, and a list of 3-5 keywords to indicate the subject area of your article. When contacting us, state your year of study, programme and briefly describe your research interests. Successful candidates will
be notified by Monday 20 February, and may be asked to make relevant editorial changes in order to qualify for publication within a specific time frame.

All articles should adhere to the word limit (4,000-6,000 words) and be submitted with a bibliography listing all works cited (not works consulted) by Monday 30 March. These should either be in doc/docx or RTF format.

A full list of guidelines and our style sheet is available at: http://www.gla.ac.uk/research/az/esharp/
For all enquiries and comments please contact: esharp@gla.ac.uk