Category Archives: cfp

ANZAMEMS 2022 Conference CFP – Panel on Aesthetics in Medieval and Early Modern Poetry

We invite scholarly proposals for papers on aesthetics in medieval and early modern poetry (c. 400 to 1800), as part of a panel or panels being established at ANZAMEMS 2022. The link to the main website and call for papers is here: https://www.anzamems2021.com/

The panel(s) will examine the influence of aesthetic styles, movements, rhetorical and aesthetic techniques and theories on the development of poetry, or the work of specified poet(s) at any time during the relevant periods in Europe and Britain. Papers should be set within the broader topic of the overall conference, and deal with questions of reception and/or emotion. Speakers might consider:

· The role of emotions in medieval or early modern aesthetic theories;

· Models of embodiment in aesthetic theories during the period;

· Theories of affect, affectus and/or feelings;

· The impact of theological and biblical sources (for example, by Augustine and Aquinas);

· The impact of philosophy of mind/body, metaphysics and ethics (such as the Platonic and Aristotelian);

· Formal theories of poetics and rhetoric, including the role of style in rhetorical figures and tropes;

· The impact of artistic movements (such as Neoplatonist, Neoclassical, Baroque) and the reciprocal influence of visual arts on poetry (eg ut pictura poiesis);

· Public and private models of ‘taste’, audience and reception;

· The role of pleasure, the imagination and sensuous and vivid imagery;

· Techniques for the aestheticization of the sacred (such as the poetics of enigma);

· Theories of the sublime and the beautiful;

· Participatory versus objectivist aesthetics;

· Materialist, or transcendental and idealist models;

· Poststructural or psychoanalytic approaches; or

· The role and value of historicist and/or modern theory.

We invite submissions for 20 minute presentations, followed by 5 minutes of Q&A. If you are interested in presenting your work, please send any questions, or otherwise the title, a 200 word abstract and a 50 word biography, at the first instance to Dr Jane Vaughan at jane.vaughan@uwa.edu.au

Deadline for Panel Submissions: 12 October 2021

The panel(s) will be held as part of the biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, at the School of Humanities, The University of Western Australia, Perth, 27 June to 1 July, 2022

CFP: Reception, Emotion, and the Crusades, panels at ANZAMEMS Conference, 27 June–1 July 2022

The theme for the 2022 ANZAMEMS (Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies) conference is ‘Reception and Emotion’. Professor Megan Cassidy-Welch (Australian Catholic University) and Dr Beth Spacey (University of Queensland) are inviting proposals for 20-minute papers to be part of a strand of themed panels examining aspects of reception and/or emotion, broadly conceived, in a crusading context. Please send your 200-word abstracts and paper title, along with a short bio (max. 50 words), to Beth (b.spacey@uq.edu.au) by 30 September 2021.

The thirteenth biennial ANZAMEMS Conference will be held on 27 June to 1 July 2022 in Perth at the University of Western Australia. More information, including details regarding travel bursaries, is available here.

Eleonora di Toledo at 500, Call for Papers

CFP RSA Dublin Wednesday March 30- Saturday April 2 2022!

Eleonora di Toledo at 500

2022 marks the five hundredth anniversary of the presumed birth of Eleonora di Toledo. The past thirty years have witnessed the publication of numerous studies that have fundamentally changed our image of the duchess of Florence from a passive object of her husband’s will to an active collaborator in the construction of an autocratic state. These panels seek new contributions about Eleonora di Toledo from all disciplines. Some themes that might be explored are “The Literary Eleonora;” “The Posthumous Eleonora;” “Eleonora in the 1550s.” Comparative approaches to the political and economic activities and the artistic, literary, musical, and religious patronage of other contemporary ruling women are especially welcome.

Proposals should be sent by August 2 to Bruce Edelstein at edelstein@nyu.edu or Natalie Tomas at natalie.tomas@monash.edu. Please include a title (15 words max), an abstract (150 words max), and a short CV (300 words max).

Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand 2021 Conference: Call for papers

The Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand 2021 Conference will be hosted online from Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland on 22-23 November 2021.

The conference theme is Communities, books and the power of words.

We invite papers that explore the intersections and dynamics between communities, books and power. These could include reflections on texts and their uses to inspire, transform or suppress communities, or the ways in which people have resisted or subverted systems of power in and through bibliographic-related domains or means. Papers could look to the past or the future or contribute to current discussions generated by international movements examining power, including in heritage, cultural and academic institutions.

To find out more about BSANZ, the 2021 conference and the call for papers, which closes on 21 June, go to: bsanz.org

AEMA Conference CFP on Eruption/Disruption/Interruption!


Conference October 1-2, 2021!

The conference committee invites papers on the theme of Eruption/Disruption/Interruption. As we continue to process the impact of COVID-19 on global and local societies, the jury is still out on whether the eruption of a global pandemic, and the subsequent disruptions and interruptions to contemporary routines, are a ‘game-changer’ or an inconvenience.

At the heart of our theme is the concept of a rupture. This can refer to something that has broken, burst, or been destroyed. It can imply that either outside forces are too great for the structure in question and have destroyed it functionally, or that something within that which has ruptured was too volatile or incompatible to remain contained, controlled, or unified. Over the past 18 months, we have been witness to both of these types of rupture, as outside forces have challenged the very foundations of our society, while at the same time, internal tensions have broken forth and resulted in historic movements for democracy, equality, environmental awareness, and corporate accountability and transparency.

Global society is at a turning point of multiple ruptured points, and the 2021 AEMA conference aims to reflect on this tension in an early medieval context.

· Eruptions can be understood in many different ways, as they can describe both natural phenomena and human activity, including the sudden appearance of new movements, of groups of people, or of ideas.

· Were eruptions revolutionary? Or were they merely a disruption to the longue durée?

· Does hindsight make it easier to identify ruptures as epoch-altering events and ideas? Or does the passage of time, and attendant loss of witnesses, memories, and evidence muddy the waters too much?

· Why and in what ways did eruptions change things? And why and in what ways did they merely disrupt.

· When and how does an interruption become a disruption?

· What did the idea of a ‘new normal’ mean in the early medieval world? How quickly do societies adapt to internal and external pressures?

· And when societies change as a result of these pressures, are they still the same society?

This conference calls for papers that relate to this theme. Or, in the spirit of the theme, those that do not.

In 2021, AEMA intends to hold a hybrid conference, with both a physical location (or locations) as well as an online option. At this stage, the main physical location is likely to be in Victoria, with the potential for additional ‘hubs’ to be held in other Australian and/or International locations, depending on interest and availability.

Submissions may be in the form of individual papers of 20 minutes duration, themed panels of three 20-minute papers, or Round Tables of up to six shorter papers (total of one hour).

All sessions will include time for questions and general discussion. Please send proposals (150–200 words per paper), along with author’s name, paper/panel/RT title, and academic affiliation (if any) to conference@aema.net.au by 31 July 2021. Please also direct all other enquiries about the conference to this address, as well as any nominations for potentially hosting an in-person hub.

ANZAMEMS Conference Postponed Until Mid-2022

We have been closely monitoring the situation in relation to coronavirus (COVID-19) and its potential impact upon the ‘Reception and Emotion’ conference.

Based on current Australian Government advice, we have decided to postpone the conference until mid-2022. The new conference dates are 27 June to 1 July 2022!

We are mindful of uncertainty prompted by the outbreak and cannot predict what impact it will have in the coming weeks and months.

Our primary concern is the health and safety of all involved in the conference, and we are aware of the need to ensure the conference is as safe an environment as possible for all.

Our Call for Papers and applications for Prizes and Travel Bursaries remain open and now close on Friday 12 November 2021. We look forward to seeing you in Perth in 2022! Updates about the conference will be posted on the conference website as details are confirmed.

Call for Submissions: Metropolitan Museum Journal

The Editorial Board of the peer-reviewed Metropolitan Museum Journal invites submissions of original research on works of art in the Museum’s collection. There are two sections: Articles and Research Notes. Articles contribute extensive and thoroughly argued scholarship. Research Notes typically present a concise, neatly bounded aspect of ongoing investigation, such as a new acquisition or attribution, or a specific, resonant finding from technical analysis. All texts must take works of art in the collection as the point of departure.

The process of peer review is double-blind. Manuscripts are reviewed by the Journal Editorial Board, composed of members of the curatorial, conserva­tion, and scientific departments, as well as scholars from the broader academic community.

Articles and Research Notes in the Journal appear both in print and online, and are accessible via MetPublications and the Journal’s home page on the University of Chicago Press website.

The Journal offers free image services to authors of accepted contributions.

The deadline for submissions for Volume 57 (2022) is September 15, 2021. Submission guidelines can be found here.

Please send materials to: journalsubmissions@metmuseum.org

CFP Ars Longa Journal

Ars Longa is a new, independent online journal and blog dedicated to Early Modern art and visual/material culture. Our aim is to create an open-access, creative platform where early career scholars and advanced graduate students can share their research and current projects. We present work that challenges conventional forms and categories, that is often open-ended and exploratory—but always based on a foundation of rigorous scholarship. We publish journal-quality work without the strictures of academic writing.

Our scope is global and we encourage a diversity of formats and methodologies. We welcome a variety of subject matter and interdisciplinary approaches, as long as they are in some way related to the visual art of the Early Modern, which we roughly define as the period from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, ca. 1400-1800.

For more information, including submission details for the journal or blog, see here.

CFP AskHistorians Digital Conference

2021 ASKHISTORIANS DIGITAL CONFERENCE: “[DELETED] & MISSING HISTORY: RECONSTRUCTING THE PAST, CONFRONTING DISTORTIONS”
19–21 October 2021
AskHistorians Public History Forum

Whether it’s swords and sandals, corsets and wigs, or statues still standing, the past and its possible meanings resonate with twenty-first century audiences. Historical television series, public history projects, and books of popular history might claim to depict the past “as it really was,” but nevertheless illuminate the ways in which we as a society continue to bring the past into dialogue with contemporary popular culture. In so doing, these narratives often reveal more about what we think about the past—and ourselves—than about the past itself. Today, shifting interpretations of the past reveal a growing interest in the inclusion of marginalized voices as well as in questions about the human condition, the relationship between race and national identity, and issues relating to the
construction of sexuality, gender, and equality. Indeed, representations of the historical past have been used as lenses through which contemporary society has grappled with very modern examples of brutality, oppression, and the general uncertainty of life.

We therefore welcome proposals from individuals whose research explores representations of the past in any form. As the scope and influence of our topic is broad and far-reaching, we encourage proposals from a wide range of scholarly disciplines on the themes of gender, identity (both personal and national), propaganda, culture, society, accuracy, and authenticity (among others) as these pertain to the ways in which historical narratives have been constructed, represented, or misrepresented.

Applicants are asked to please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words and a short biography of no more than 100 words to conference@askhistorians.com by 11:59 PM EDT on 1 June 2021.

For more information, including suggested topics and a guide for submissions, see the attached document.

CFP MEMS Festival, University of Kent

Join us online for the University of Kent’s seventh annual MEMS Summer Festival. This two-day event celebrates Medieval and Early Modern history, 400 – 1800, and encourages a wide range of interdisciplinary topics, including but not limited to politics, religion, economics, art, drama, literature, and domestic culture. MEMS Fest aims to be an informal space in which postgraduate students, early career researchers, and academics can share ideas and foster conversations, whilst building a greater sense of community. Undergraduate students in their final year of study are also welcome at the conference.

We invite abstracts of up to 250 words for individual research papers of 20 minutes in length on ANY subject relating to the Medieval and Early Modern periods. The research can be in its earliest stages or a more developed piece.

We also encourage 700-word abstracts proposing a three-person panel, presenting on a specific subject or theme in Medieval or Early Modern studies. If you have an idea and would like us to advertise for it, please contact us at memsfestival@gmail.com.

Deadline for all Paper and Panel Proposals is Friday 30th April 2021. All applications must be sent to memsfestival@gmail.com with ‘MEMS Fest 2021 Abstract’ as the subject of the email.