Category Archives: cfp

CFP NonfictioNOW

Call for Panel Proposals: NonfictioNOW, 3-5 December 2020, Wellington, New Zealand

Please note NonfictioNOW is different from other conferences in that it seeks collective panel proposals rather than individual papers.  Please read through the entire CFP – this adds a layer of complexity but results in a very rewarding outcome.

We invite you to join us in New Zealand in 2020 to celebrate the return of NonfictioNOW to the Asia Pacific region. We are now seeking panel proposals for the conference, proudly hosted by Massey University and held at the Te Papa Tongarewa, the stunning harbour-side Museum of New Zealand. We warmly welcome participants and audiences from all over the globe to engage with and bring new ideas to our conversations. We are excited to have Ngahuia Te Awekotuku and Mary Cappello confirmed as keynote speakers, with more announcements to come.

This celebrated bi-annual international event is unique: this isn’t a conventional academic conference nor a writers’ festival, but a lively conversation among peers. NonfictioNOW brings together well-established writers and those just starting out. We are especially interested in proposals for sessions that defy the expectations and/or subvert the format of the traditional conference or festival panel, as well as those that include a diverse group of participants, reflecting the inclusive and international nature of this gathering.

Many NonfictioNOW panels are lively, discursive, playful, and interactive events, as opposed to the reading of a succession of individual papers. We are enthusiastic about the great energy and range present in all of nonfiction’s many forms, including literary and political essays; memoir and journalism; digital media, graphic memoirs, and hybrid essays; performance-based work; ecological writing; podcasts; and other areas of the field. We hope to receive great proposals exploring the many different shapes of nonfiction, with variety and diversity serving to enlarge both the conversation and the nonfiction community.

PANEL PROPOSALS

Submissions are due March 31, 2020. All submissions must include a panel description (150 words or less, written as it should appear in the program, if accepted), a statement of merit (150 words or less), and the complete contact information for a minimum of three, and up to five, contacted and pre-selected panel participants, including a program-ready bio of 50 words or less for each participant.

For more details, please see the attached PDF or the website here. Proposal submissions should be made through the online form.

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CFP Generosity and Avarice in Medieval Europe

Generosity and Avarice in Medieval Europe: University of Nottingham, 23-24 April 2020

From the depictions of generosity and avarice in art and literature, to the interactions amongst neighbours within local communities, to the diplomatic work undertaken within and between polities, the relationship between these distinct but intertwined themes have been grappled with by medieval contemporaries and modern scholars alike. This conference aims to bring together medievalists of all fields and disciplines interested in the understanding and practice of generosity, avarice, and the relationship between the two in Europe between c. 400 and c. 1550. The committee welcomes suggestions for sessions beyond those outlined here and encourages as broad an interpretation of the theme as possible. Topics to be addressed may include, but are not limited to:

· Patronage
· Education
· Ideas of social responsibility
· Gender roles
· Materialities
· Spirituality
· Economy and finance
· Morality
· Diplomatic relations
· Family roles
· Sexuality
· Visual and literary depictions of generosity and avarice

We welcome contributions from scholars at any stage of study or career. For individual papers of twenty minutes in length, please submit a proposal of c. 250-words. If you plan to submit a panel proposal, please include no more than three speakers and submit a c. 300-word overview of the panel with proposed speakers/respondents (and chair, if applicable) and provisional paper titles.

Please submit all proposals via email to ahxjlca@nottingham.ac.uk by Friday 13th December 2019.

Find us on twitter @Generosity2020 or visit the conference website https://generosityandavarice.wordpress.com/ for more information and updates.

Call for History of Emotions Manuscript Proposals

Announcing a new series on the history of emotions, published by Bloomsbury and edited by Peter Stearns and Susan Matt.

Editorial Board: Rob Boddice, Pia Campeggiani, Angelika Messner, Javier Moscoso, Charles Zika

We are seeking proposals for monographs which explore emotions in history. We seek to create a truly international series, with works on feelings from across the globe, from the ancient world to the present. We really hope to use the series to promote varied and imaginative work in this growing scholarly field. If interested, please send a short précis to pstearns@gmu.edu or smatt@weber.edu.

CFP Annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum

41st Annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum:
Scent and Fragrance in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance
Keene State College
Keene, NH, USA
Friday and Saturday April 17-18, 2020

Call for Papers and Sessions
We are delighted to announce that the 41st Medieval and Renaissance Forum: Scent and Fragrance in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance will take place on Friday, April 17 and Saturday April 18, 2020 at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire. 

We welcome abstracts (one page or less) or panel proposals that discuss smell and fragrance in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Papers and sessions, however, need not be confined to this theme but may cover other aspects of medieval and Renaissance life, literature, languages, art, philosophy, theology, history, and music.

This year’s keynote speaker is Deirdre Larkin, Managing Horticulturist at The Cloisters Museum and Gardens from 2007 to 2013, who will speak on “Every Fragrant Herb: The Medieval Garden and the Gardens of The Cloisters.”

Deirdre Larkin is a horticulturist and historian of plants and gardens. She holds an MA in the history of religions from Princeton University and received her horticultural training at the New York Botanical Garden. She was associated with the Gardens of The Cloisters for more than twenty years and was responsible for all aspects of their development, design, and interpretation. Ms. Larkin was the originator of and principal contributor to the Medieval Garden Enclosed blog, published on the MMA website from 2008 through 2013. Ms. Larkin lectures frequently for museums, historical societies, and horticultural organizations. In 2017, she was a Mellon Visiting Scholar at the Humanities Institute of the New York Botanical Garden, where she researched the fortunes and reputations of medieval European plants now naturalized in North America. Her gardens in upstate New York serve as a laboratory for further investigations in the field.

Students, faculty, and independent scholars are welcome. Please indicate your status (undergraduate, graduate, or faculty), affiliation (if relevant), and full contact information (including email address) on your proposal.

We welcome undergraduate sessions, but ask that students obtain a faculty member’s approval and sponsorship.  

Please submit abstracts, audio/visual needs, and full contact information to Dr. Robert G. Sullivan, Assistant Forum Director at sullivan@german.umass.edu.

Abstract deadline: January 15, 2020

Presenters and early registration: March 15, 2020

As always, we look forward to greeting returning and first-time participants to Keene in April!

CFP Viator: Looking Ahead: Global Encounters in the North Atlantic, ca. 350–1300

A special dossier in Viator

Co-edited by Nahir Otaño Gracia, Nicole Lopez-Jantzen, and Erica Weaver

In the last few years, several urgent interventions have begun to reshape medieval studies as a more capacious and inclusive field. Scholars such as Geraldine Heng, Monica Green, and Michael Gomez have expanded our understanding of the multifaceted interactions between and among Africa, Asia, Europe, and elsewhere, while Adam Miyashiro and Mary Rambaran-Olm have urged us to reassess the North Atlantic in particular. Traditionally, scholars have tended to work within national borders or to focus on how North Atlantic cultures changed the rest of the globe rather than how they were themselves changed by global interactions, with drastic consequences for our field––especially for our earliest periods.

In order to continue these important conversations and to expand what our scholarship can look like going forward, this special essay cluster seeks to provide a platform for early-career scholars to propose new critical directions for the study of the early medieval North Atlantic, broadly encompassing ca. 350–1300. We thus invite short, rigorous interventions (2000–3500 words each), in the model of the popular conference genre of “lightning talks.” In particular, we seek imaginative new work that expands the contours of early medieval studies and challenges, or transgresses, its standard disciplinary, temporal, and linguistic boundaries. Following the example set by the IONA: Islands of the North Atlantic conferences, we reject the unproductive disciplinary divides that have separated the study of England, Wales, Ireland, Francia, Scandinavia, the Iberian Peninsula, Africa, and even the Mediterranean both from each other and from points further afield along the Atlantic rim and beyond. We also aim to break down the divisions that have artificially separated Late Antiquity and the early and high Middle Ages. We are intentionally leaving this call for papers very broad, because we come from the perspective that the global does not exclude the local, and vice-versa. Moreover, the insular can be archipelagic. We welcome essays that bring together North Atlantic and Mediterranean Studies, or that read what has been seen as national literature from a transnational perspective.

In the spirit of emerging from our own linguistic silos and in Viator’s usual practice, we thus welcome work from scholars writing in English, Spanish, and French. Additionally, we particularly invite work from graduate students, postdocs, independent scholars, and members of the precariat as well as contributions that are explicitly feminist, queer, anti-racist, and decolonial. We would like to be as inclusive as possible, so please contact us if you have any questions.

Short abstracts of around 200 words are due by December 2 to ViatorIssue@gmail.com, with essays to be submitted by January 15.

CFP Field of Cloth of Gold Conference 2020

In celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Field of Cloth of Gold and as part of the AHRC funded Network “Henry VIII on Tour: Tudor Palaces and Royal Progresses”, Historic Royal Palaces will be hosting a two-day conference on 29-30 June 2020 at Hampton Court Palace.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
• Simon Thurley
• Mary Hill Cole, Mary Baldwin University
• Glenn Richardson, St Mary’s University
• Tracy Borman, Historic Royal Palaces (Introduction)

We invite proposals for papers of 20 minutes reflecting the conference theme. In particular, we encourage papers that examine not only that most spectacular of royal progresses, the 1520 Field of Cloth of Gold expedition itself, but the phenomenon of royal progresses more generally, including the logistics of royal travel and the politics of progress. We would also like to explore broader aspects of the Tudor court on progress, including the social, religious, chivalric and cultural implications of royal progresses (e.g. the hunting, jousting, music, drama, art and architecture associated with the royal palaces and other progress venues). Papers addressing a comparative European or international aspect of the theme are welcomed as, too, are contributions that consider the theme from the point of view of heritage management, heritage science and curatorial practice. We encourage proposals from scholars at all stages of their career, including early career researchers and PhD students (for whom a discounted registration rate will be available).

Please send abstracts of 250 words to Dr Laura Tompkins, Research Manager, HRP (Laura.Tompkins@hrp.org.uk) by 12 January 2020.

This information is also available on the HRP website.

Organising Committee: Anthony Musson (HRP), Tom Betteridge (Brunel), John Cooper (York), Suzannah Lipscomb (Roehampton), Alden Gregory (HRP)

CFP Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference

The organisers and the Programme Committee invite proposals for the 2020 Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference to be held in Edinburgh on 1-4 July 2020.

Proposals on all topics relating to Medieval and Renaissance Music, broadly construed, are welcomed, but we are particularly interested in the following areas: Music in Britain; Chant; Gender and music; Music and medievalism; Music and the environment; Music outside of continental Europe; Early Music and Digital Technologies; The state of the discipline

Conference languages: English, French, German, Italian, Spanish

Possible formats of presentations include, but are not limited to:
• individual papers of 20 minutes
• paired papers
• themed sessions
• round tables
• workshops/ lecture-recitals
• posters
The conference will include a dedicated poster session.

Please send proposals to medren2020@gmail.com by 31 December. Notification of acceptance will be given by February 14th. Proposals should include:
·        Title of paper
·        Speaker(s)
·        Affiliation
·        A proposal of c.250 words
For themed sessions:
• title of paper
• chair (if known)
• names of all participants
• total required duration (blocks of 90 minutes are preferred)
• short description of contents

Registration will go live on February 1 2020 at the following address: https://www.efdelegates.ed.ac.uk/MedRen2020

Programme Committee:
• James Cook
• Marianne Gillion
• Thomas Schmidt
• Adam Whittaker
• Miriam Wendling
• Raquel Rojo Carillo,
• Tess Knighton,
• Elisabeth Giselbrecht
• Victori Coelho
• Catherine Bradly
• Antonio Chemotti

CFP Medieval English Theatre Conference

Consumption, Performance, and Early Theatre, University of Wolverhampton・Saturday, 4 April 2020

Consumption involves the using up of a resource, whether through acts of imbibing or intake and acts of expenditure or through decaying or wasting away. Early performance relies on consumption, whether this takes the form of Eucharistic consumption accompanying liturgy; Eve’s sinful act of consumption that provided pretext and plot for urban biblical pageants; the use of performance to sell goods and medicines; the material goods required to create dramatic spectacle; the consumption of drink, ideas and time by spectators and performers; or the Tudor feasts that produced space for dramatic interludes. The Records of Early English Drama, with their lists of goods, payments and services, provide an archive of evidence for consumption practice. Yet acts of consumption in early drama are often fraught. Consumption is as often used to articulate doubt or mark characters and performance makers as morally dubious as it is to ensnare the senses of audiences. In a climate both preoccupied with material consumption at a global level and in which we, as researchers, theatre practitioners and teachers are frequently reminded that our labour is also consumer material, this conference seeks to examine how consumption is manifested, managed and questioned in early performance. Topics might include but are not limited to:

• The consumption of raw materials and/ or material culture in the production and performance of early drama
• Food or fasting in early performance; the morality, ethics and/or theology of consumption
• Economies of consumption in early performance
• Ritual performance and faith; inclusion and community
• Subversive consumption, over-consumption and/or consumption as a source of ‘othering’
• Consumption, spectacle and the senses
• The consumption of play manuscripts and texts
• Critical reflections on the role of consumption within modern performances and broadcasts of early drama
• Critical reflections on the role of consumption in early drama pedagogy and/or research

We invite 300-word proposals from scholars at any stage of study or career, for 20 minute papers or roundtable sessions; please submit your proposals by 1 December 2019 to Daisy Black d.black3@wlv.ac.uk

On the day before the conference (Friday, 3 April 2020) there will be a Postgraduate and Early Career Symposium organised with the Early English Drama & Performance Network; more information about this will be posted soon.

Further details and registration information will be posted soon at Medieval English Theatre.

CFP International Society for Intellectual History

‘Change and Exchange’: The 2020 Conference of the International Society for Intellectual History, 27 – 29 May 2020, European University Institute

The suddenness of many recent changes has led to a widespread feeling of bewilderment and led many to retreat into what are seen as safe places and idealised pasts, rejection of difference and increasingly violent and intolerant social exchange. At the same time, the evidence of climate change is making people increasingly aware of the need to rethink our way of life. It therefore seems an appropriate moment to look at how change has been understood and conceptualised in the past, how changes in ways of thinking, concepts and paradigms have come about, the strength of resistance to change, and the role of exchange – intellectual and material – in this process. Change and Exchange proposes to explore historical, philosophical, cultural, material, social, environmental and scientific change, the varieties of social, intellectual, material, economic, etc. exchange and the interactions between the two. It will also look at change and exchange in the field of Intellectual History itself.

The International Society for Intellectual History (ISIH) invites proposals for papers and panels. Papers (20 mins, followed by 10 mins of discussion), relating to the theme of change and exchange in intellectual history at large, can concentrate on any period, region, tradition or discipline, including the arts, humanities and sciences, 1450 to present. As well as individual papers, we welcome proposals for panels of up to three papers and a commentator. The range of subjects of investigation is extremely broad, and may include, but is not limited to:

• thinking about change in intellectual history: epistemological breaks, paradigm change and intellectual traditions;
• interdisciplinarity in intellectual history
• debates on social, political, economic, scientific, technological, climate, etc. change;
• writing the history of change; changes of scale in historical understanding
• interactions between political, social, economic, technological, scientific and intellectual change;
• promoting and resisting change;
• informal and institutional exchanges between cultures and their role in bringing about change;
• sociability and intellectual, scientific, commercial, institutional etc. networks;
• the theory, practice, history and role of translation.

Proposals for papers and panels are due by 15 November 2019 and must be submitted through the Conference Submission Form.
Sponsor: Department of History and Civilisation, European University Institute.

For general inquiries, please email Francesca.Parenti@eui.eu.
Conference Committee: Ann Thomson, Thomas Ashby, Elisavet Papalexopoulou, Francesca Parenti.

The details of the conference can also be found on the ISIH website.

CFP Yearbook of the Spanish and Portuguese Society for English Renaissance Studies

SEDERI welcomes ARTICLES, NOTES and REVIEWS for its next issue (nº 30) to be published in Autumn 2020. SEDERI, Yearbook of the Spanish and Portuguese Society for English Renaissance Studies, is an annual publication devoted to current criticism and scholarship on Early Modern English Studies. It is peer-reviewed by external readers, following a double-blind policy. It is published in paper and online, in open-access.

QUALITY ASSESSMENT AND INDEXING
SEDERI is included in the Web of Science, the Arts & Humanities Citation Index, the MLA International Bibliography, Scopus, EBSCO Host, ProQuest, ERIH+, Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (ABELL), Dialnet plus, The Spanish Repository for Science and Technology (RECYT), CIRC, CARHUS+, DICE (CSIC-CINDOC-Aneca), Latindex, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. SEDERI’s scientific and editorial excellence has been accredited continually by the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT) since 2009. It meets 100% of the scientific requirements established by Latindex and DICE-CINDOC. The Italian National Agency for the Assessment of Research (ANVUR) has ranked SEDERI Yearbook as an «A» journal.

AREAS OF INTEREST
Early Modern English Literature
Early Modern English History and Culture
Early Modern English Language
Restoration English Studies
Early Modern Anglo-Spanish and cross-cultural studies
Early Modern Anglo-Portuguese cross-cultural studies

EDITORIAL PROCESS
Submissions will be sent to two readers for review, following a double blind, peer-review policy. In case of disagreement, a third report will be decisive. If the paper is accepted for publication, the authors may be asked to consider the readers’ suggestions and to bring it into line with our style sheet. The contributions, in their final form, will go through copyediting, layout, and proofreading. Once published, the authors will receive a copy of the issue in which their work is included.

SUBMISSION INFORMATION
Time from submission to decision: 3-4 months
From decision to publication: 6-9 months
Number of readers prior to decision: 2-3
Articles/notes submitted per year: 20-25
Articles/notes published per year: 6-12
Information updated on July 2019

Submissions should be sent through the SEDERI online submission platform (https://recyt.fecyt.es/index.php/SEDY/about/submissions). If you are not a user of the SEDERI platform yet, you will need to register as a new user before logging in. All submissions should be in Word/RTF format. Please omit any personal information in the file of your paper and make sure the file properties do not show your name.

Deadline for submission: 31 October 2019

For further details please download the attached CFP and style sheet:

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