Category Archives: cfp

CFP Australian Early Medieval Association Conference

Australian Early Medieval Association conference, 30 Sept-2 Oct 2020, The University of Western Australia

The conference committee invites papers on the theme Journeys: Discovery and Belonging. The period we study was marked by the disintegration of established political and social orders, widespread migrations and incursions, and rising competition between religious ideologies. Developing forms of inter-cultural contact and exchange gave rise to new ways of conceptualising and articulating identity and alterity, but while new boundaries – physical and ideational – were established, all boundaries remained porous. People, objects and ideas continued to circulate, to take journeys. How did existing communities and new migrants adapt to, or resist, each other? How were institutions modified to include, accommodate or exclude new worldviews? What was the role of material culture in holding fast to the old, and in legitimising and promoting new polities, new ethnicities, and new ideologies? How did cross-cultural contacts in the early medieval period shape history?

We invite submissions on the following topics:

• Exchange across borders- trade, culture, and human trafficking  • Maintaining and modifying identity • Maritime exploration • Invasion, settlement, assimilation. • Cultural geography: significant space and place • The book as traveller / the reader as voyager • Imagined otherworlds / imagined others • The idea and material expression of homelands • Emotions and journeys / emotional journeys • Pilgrimage and adventure • Travel narratives • First
contacts • Reading race and ethnicity: conflict and co-existence • Conversion and religious conflict • Accommodation and defiance—tensions in the quest to belong • Translation, adaptation, linguistic change • Viewing ‘Europe’ from outside • Afterlives of the early medieval in modern identity formation.

AEMA also welcomes papers concerned with all aspects of the Early Medieval period (c. 400–1150) in all cultural, geographic, religious and linguistic settings, even if they do not strictly adhere to the theme.

We especially encourage submissions from graduate students and early career researchers.
Abstracts of 150-200 words for 20-minute papers should be submitted via email to conference@aema.net.au by 31 May 2020.

Please see below for a downloadable copy of the conference CFP, and an additional call for contributions for a proposed panel at the conference on ‘Medieval Recreations’.

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‘Warfare, Weapons, Wounds – An Interdisciplinary Workshop’ 10-11 December 2020, University of Auckland, New Zealand

If death and injury are central to warfare, so are the tools that cause bodily harm. This inter- disciplinary workshop, hosted by the University of Auckland’s ‘War in Context’ research hub, explores the cultures of violence and control that form around military weaponry by focusing on the wounds they inflict and the (at least perceived) pain and suffering they provoke. It investigates the ways in which individuals, communities, states, and militaries imagine, represent, adapt, and receive military technologies in the context of their wounding capacity.

We invite proposals for papers (30min, followed by 10min for questions and discussion) that focus on particular weapons (or types of weapons), the context in which they are used, and the ‘wounds’ they cause. We welcome papers from any historical period, including today, and hope to attract scholars from a wide range of disciplines and cultural perspectives. As such, ‘wounds’ can, and indeed should, be interpreted in a broad way and can encompass not only physical, but psychological, social, cultural, and political damage.

It is planned that the workshop will form the core of a publication – either an edited collection or special edition of an academic journal.

Proposals should include a title, an abstract (no more than 250 words), and a brief biography (no more than 250 words). We welcome proposals from scholars at all stages of their careers, including graduate students and early career scholars.

Proposals should be submitted through this submission portal by 1 June 2020.

There may be a small registration fee to help cover catering and other costs. If you would like to attend, even if not offering a paper, please also note your interest here by 1 June 2020 and you will be sent registration information once that is available.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact one of the conference organizers: Maartje Abbenhuis (m.abbenhuis@auckland.ac.nz), Jeremy Armstrong (js.armstrong@auckland.ac.nz), and Thomas Gregory (t.gregory@auckland.ac.nz).

CFP ‘Reception, Emotion and the Royal Body’ panel at #ANZA21

This panel will convene at the Thirteenth Biennial Conference of the Australia and
New Zealand Association of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (#anza21), to be
held at The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, from 8-12 February
2021. https://www.anzamems2021.com/

The idea of the ‘king’s two bodies’, a duality predicated on the idea that a
monarch possessed two bodies, a body natural and a body politic–the former
mortal, the latter an embodiment of both the nation and the authority of
sovereignty–has long been of interest to scholars of medieval and early modern
monarchies.

The body of a monarch remains a contest site, with the life, health, fertility, and
sexuality of kings or queens continuing to be an important part of politics. Royal
scandal graces the covers of newspapers and magazines and trends on social
media, and royal weddings, births, and deaths continue to capture the public’s
imagination and interest.

We seek papers that examine the significance of the royal body, in particular, the
reception of the royal body across time periods, cultures, and media and how
royal bodies both convey and elicit emotions:

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
• Historiography
• Iconography and representation
• Drama and literature
• Political theory
• Divine bodies
• Rituals and ceremony
• Effigies and monuments
• Age, health and pregnancy
• Fertility, chastity, virility
• Royal births and deaths
• Christenings, coronations, weddings and funerals
• Regicide
• Royal touch
• Deformity and disability
• Royal Dress
• Sex and Scandal
• Gender
• Sexuality
• Race
• Medievalism and early-modernism
• Performance
• Audiences
• Popular culture
• Film and television
• Comics and graphic novels
• Fandom
• Celebrity

Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:
1. A title
2. An abstract (max. 200 words)
3. A short biography (max. 50 words)

Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) to:
mgerzic@gmail.com by 30 June 2020.

CFP ANZAMEMS 2021

The Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies
conference committee seeks proposals for its 2021 conference on the theme ‘Reception and
Emotion’, to be held in Perth, Australia at The University of Western Australia from 8–12
February.

The committee welcomes all approaches to topics related to ‘reception and emotion’ broadly
conceived (and conceived either together or separately: i.e., on reception and emotion, or on
either reception or emotion), including but not limited to: trans-cultural, trans-temporal,
trans-disciplinary, translation, global studies, creative misreadings, theatrical and literary
revivals, forgeries, homages, cultural counter-strikes, regimes of periodisation, etc. We
welcome proposals considering the usefulness or otherwise of reception history as a
methodology: is ‘transformation’ more helpful than ‘reception’, for example, for appreciating
the active role of the audience of a text, play, or idea?

Work on emotions can be similarly broad, covering, e.g., what’s evidenced from the
‘receivers’ and from the ‘received’ (thinking of work, for example, on how Indigenous
people have received missionaries and their doctrines; how medievalists have reacted and
acted in relation to the worrying associations of their discipline; even how humanities
scholars feel about their reception in contemporary political circles; Jan Plamper’s suggestion
that historians should keep ‘field diaries’ about their personal response to work in the
archives; are there ‘objective’ studies?). What’s been the value and downside of the
‘emotional turn’ in humanities studies? How do we as scholars of the past deal with presentist
notions of ‘relevance’, and need we consider past scholarship as ‘outdated? How can we
marry approaches from humanities and life sciences in ‘emotions history’?

Call for Papers

The conference committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, 90-minute themed panels
(of no more than 4 speakers) or workshops. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The reception of ideas about emotion in medieval/early modern texts;
  • Reception and transformation of ideologies across time and space;
  • The emotions of an audience in the reception of a play or sermon;
  • The emotional impact of a text on a reader;
  • Rituals and practices of receiving guests and dignitaries (and their emotional
    effects?);
  • The reception of the past: medievalism and early-modernism;
  • The reception of bodies / emotions and bodies / embodiment;
  • Reception / emotion and sexuality;
  • Reception / emotion and race;
  • Reception / emotion and gender;
  • Reception / emotion and music / art

Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:

  1. A title;
  2. An abstract (max. 200 words);
  3. A short biography (max. 50 words).

The conference committee welcomes themed panel or workshop session proposals for the
conference. Proposals should consist of:

  1. Panel/Workshop Title;
  2. Proposed Chair (if available);
  3. Details of each presenter and paper as described above.

NB: Workshops will be allotted 90 minutes, 30 of which should be reserved for general
discussion. We suggest a maximum of 6 speakers.

Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) to:
anzamems2021@gmail.com. Deadline for submissions: 31 July 2020.

NB: Should you require early acceptance of your proposal please highlight this in your email
and the committee will do our best to accommodate your request.

For more information please visit the conference website.

CFP eSharp Journal

eSharp, Issue 28 (Summer 2020), ‘Estrangement and Reconciliation’

Postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers are invited to submit an article for possible inclusion in the next issue of the eSharp journal on the theme of ‘Estrangement and Reconciliation’.

Deadlines:
Abstracts: Thursday, 6 February 2020
Full Paper: Monday, 30 March 2020

eSharp is an international online journal for postgraduate research in the Arts, Humanities, Social and Political Sciences and Education. Based at the University of Glasgow and run entirely by postgraduate students, it aims to provide a critical but supportive entry into the realm of academic publishing for emerging academics. Papers will be submitted to double-blind peer
review.

Estrangement and Reconciliation
The Oxford English Dictionary defines estrangement as ‘separation, withdrawal, alienation in feeling or affection’. It gives a number of meanings for reconciliation, including ‘the fact or condition of a person’s or humanity’s being reconciled with God’, ‘The action of restoring estranged persons or parties to friendship’, and ‘The action or act of bringing a thing or things to agreement, concord or harmony’. As the breadth of these definitions demonstrates, the experience of estrangement, and the struggle for reconciliation, are part of the universal human condition. Dealing with estrangement is not only a personal challenge for individuals, but a central concern in art and literature (playing a major role in movements such as romanticism, modernism and post-modernism), in education (where there is an increasing focus on teaching inter-personal skills and on pastoral care), and in politics (not only when responding to political and military conflicts, but also to issues such as migration and climate change). We would welcome proposals that explore the theme from the perspective of any of these disciplines, of any geographical location, and of any historical period. We particularly encourage proposals that are interdisciplinary, and that compare and contrast different approaches to achieving reconciliation. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

1) Estrangement due to exile, migration, environmental changes, border frontiers, seeking asylum, the condition of being a stranger.
2) Estrangement due to encounters with the arts, the representation of the known world or having been brought out of oneself, as well as experiences of the abject or the uncanny.
3) Estrangement due to breakdown of personal relationships, the struggle to form such relationships (e.g. among minorities such as LGBTQIA+ people and those with autism), as well as physical, linguistic, social, cultural, ethnic, political and military divisions.
4) Spiritual estrangement due to guilt, the loss of religious faith, separation from nature, a feeling (as in existentialist fiction and philosophy) that one is an ‘outsider’ in one’s native land.
5) The process of individual and collective acceptance of the new identities/selves/relationships borne of estrangement.

Requirements
We welcome contributions by postgraduate students working in any area of the Arts, Humanities, Social and Political Sciences or Education. We also accept submissions from postdoctoral researchers within one year of completing their PhD.

Please submit an abstract of 250-300 words summarising your argument, and a list of 3-5 keywords to indicate the subject area of your article. When contacting us, state your year of study, programme and briefly describe your research interests. Successful candidates will
be notified by Monday 20 February, and may be asked to make relevant editorial changes in order to qualify for publication within a specific time frame.

All articles should adhere to the word limit (4,000-6,000 words) and be submitted with a bibliography listing all works cited (not works consulted) by Monday 30 March. These should either be in doc/docx or RTF format.

A full list of guidelines and our style sheet is available at: http://www.gla.ac.uk/research/az/esharp/
For all enquiries and comments please contact: esharp@gla.ac.uk

Deadline extended: Taiwan Association of Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies

The CFP for the 14th International Conference of the Taiwan Association of Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies (TACMRS) with the theme ‘Food: Sacrificial, Spiritual, and Secular’ to be held at the National Taiwan University, Taipei, on 23-24 October 2020, has been extended until February 10. The updated CFP can be downloaded below.

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CFP Taiwan Association of Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies

The Fourteenth International Conference of the Taiwan Association of Classical,
Medieval and Renaissance Studies (TACMRS)
23-24 October 2020, National Taiwan University, Taipei
Food: Sacrificial, Spiritual, and Secular

Food, whether secular or spiritual, physical or metaphysical, human or nonhuman, has
been an important issue throughout the history of this planet. Human history is a long
story of appetitive contest with nature and the environment, while consumption is an
empowering practice that involves struggle and sacrifice. The matter of food may
illuminate or complicate histories of labor, leisure, science, production, ethical
considerations, religious discourse and practices, and environmental concerns.

To explore the important issues of food/drink/consumption, this conference welcomes
papers from scholars working in all fields such as anthropology, geography, history,
literature, art, politics, sociology, religion, and cultural studies from the pre-modern to
the early modern periods. Topics for consideration might include (but are not limited
to):

Art and Visualization of food/drink/consumption
Boundaries of the edible and nonedible
Critical explorations of food/drink/consumption
Culinary writings
Politics of food/drink/consumption
Religion, Heresy, or the Sacred Forms of food/drink/consumption
Food/drink/consumption and Fasting, Festivity, or Medicine
Food/drink/consumption and Emotions, Obsessions, or Language
Food/drink/consumption and Gender, Racial Identity, or Society
Food/drink/consumption and the Moralistic/Legislative
Food/drink/consumption and Ecology, Philosophy, or Theology
Food/drink/consumption and Medievalism or Technology

TACMRS warmly invites papers either in English or Chinese that reach beyond the
traditional chronological and disciplinary borders of Classical, Medieval, and Early
Modern Studies. This conference will comprise Paper sessions and a Roundtable
discussion for pedagogy. Paper proposals and sponsored panel proposals (with
individual paper abstracts) are welcomed. To ensure the quality of the papers
presented, the presenters should submit drafts of full papers by the end of August
2020. Selected full papers will be peer-reviewed and published in a special issue of
Ex-position.

Please submit proposals (250 words for English, 500 words for Chinese) along
with a one-page CV to tacmrs.ntu@gmail.com by 6 January 2020. The
Conference will take place on 23-24 October 2020 at National Taiwan University
in Taipei, Taiwan. There is no registration fee for the conference. Please note,
presenters should be members of TACMRS if they reside in Taiwan. Membership
application forms can be downloaded from the TACMRS website or via email upon
request. For more information, please visit the 2020 TACMRS Conference website at
https://2020tacmrs.wordpress.com/ and the TACMRS website at
http://tacmrs.org.tw/main.php.

For more details see the attached CFP:

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CFP NonfictioNOW

Call for Panel Proposals: NonfictioNOW, 3-5 December 2020, Wellington, New Zealand

Please note NonfictioNOW is different from other conferences in that it seeks collective panel proposals rather than individual papers.  Please read through the entire CFP – this adds a layer of complexity but results in a very rewarding outcome.

We invite you to join us in New Zealand in 2020 to celebrate the return of NonfictioNOW to the Asia Pacific region. We are now seeking panel proposals for the conference, proudly hosted by Massey University and held at the Te Papa Tongarewa, the stunning harbour-side Museum of New Zealand. We warmly welcome participants and audiences from all over the globe to engage with and bring new ideas to our conversations. We are excited to have Ngahuia Te Awekotuku and Mary Cappello confirmed as keynote speakers, with more announcements to come.

This celebrated bi-annual international event is unique: this isn’t a conventional academic conference nor a writers’ festival, but a lively conversation among peers. NonfictioNOW brings together well-established writers and those just starting out. We are especially interested in proposals for sessions that defy the expectations and/or subvert the format of the traditional conference or festival panel, as well as those that include a diverse group of participants, reflecting the inclusive and international nature of this gathering.

Many NonfictioNOW panels are lively, discursive, playful, and interactive events, as opposed to the reading of a succession of individual papers. We are enthusiastic about the great energy and range present in all of nonfiction’s many forms, including literary and political essays; memoir and journalism; digital media, graphic memoirs, and hybrid essays; performance-based work; ecological writing; podcasts; and other areas of the field. We hope to receive great proposals exploring the many different shapes of nonfiction, with variety and diversity serving to enlarge both the conversation and the nonfiction community.

PANEL PROPOSALS

Submissions are due March 31, 2020. All submissions must include a panel description (150 words or less, written as it should appear in the program, if accepted), a statement of merit (150 words or less), and the complete contact information for a minimum of three, and up to five, contacted and pre-selected panel participants, including a program-ready bio of 50 words or less for each participant.

For more details, please see the attached PDF or the website here. Proposal submissions should be made through the online form.

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CFP Generosity and Avarice in Medieval Europe

Generosity and Avarice in Medieval Europe: University of Nottingham, 23-24 April 2020

From the depictions of generosity and avarice in art and literature, to the interactions amongst neighbours within local communities, to the diplomatic work undertaken within and between polities, the relationship between these distinct but intertwined themes have been grappled with by medieval contemporaries and modern scholars alike. This conference aims to bring together medievalists of all fields and disciplines interested in the understanding and practice of generosity, avarice, and the relationship between the two in Europe between c. 400 and c. 1550. The committee welcomes suggestions for sessions beyond those outlined here and encourages as broad an interpretation of the theme as possible. Topics to be addressed may include, but are not limited to:

· Patronage
· Education
· Ideas of social responsibility
· Gender roles
· Materialities
· Spirituality
· Economy and finance
· Morality
· Diplomatic relations
· Family roles
· Sexuality
· Visual and literary depictions of generosity and avarice

We welcome contributions from scholars at any stage of study or career. For individual papers of twenty minutes in length, please submit a proposal of c. 250-words. If you plan to submit a panel proposal, please include no more than three speakers and submit a c. 300-word overview of the panel with proposed speakers/respondents (and chair, if applicable) and provisional paper titles.

Please submit all proposals via email to ahxjlca@nottingham.ac.uk by Friday 13th December 2019.

Find us on twitter @Generosity2020 or visit the conference website https://generosityandavarice.wordpress.com/ for more information and updates.

Call for History of Emotions Manuscript Proposals

Announcing a new series on the history of emotions, published by Bloomsbury and edited by Peter Stearns and Susan Matt.

Editorial Board: Rob Boddice, Pia Campeggiani, Angelika Messner, Javier Moscoso, Charles Zika

We are seeking proposals for monographs which explore emotions in history. We seek to create a truly international series, with works on feelings from across the globe, from the ancient world to the present. We really hope to use the series to promote varied and imaginative work in this growing scholarly field. If interested, please send a short précis to pstearns@gmu.edu or smatt@weber.edu.