Category Archives: cfp

CFP: The Languages of Medieval England

The French Journal of Medieval English Studies Études Médiévales Anglaises is seeking
submissions for its 102nd issue focusing on “the Languages of Medieval England”. The papers, written in French or English, should be submitted to Elise Louviot by December 15th, 2022 (see more information below). Authors who wish to submit a paper are advised to get in touch and submit a title with a brief description of content as soon as convenient.
It is a well-known fact that Medieval England, like most places at any given time in human history, was multilingual. The languages of Medieval England are many: Brittonic, Latin, English, Old Norse and French, to name but the most important, and each item on that list can be further subdivided into several varieties (along geographical, but also sociological & stylistic lines).
Examining the languages of Medieval England requires us to think of how they interacted and related to each other, from a number of perspectives.
From a sociolinguistic perspective, it is worth investigating the respective statuses of these languages. Who used them? For what purposes? What was the meaning of using a certain language in this or that context? For instance, the broad lines of the interplay between English and Latin throughout the period are well-known: Old English gradually challenged the dominant status of Latin as the official written language; the Conquest re-instated Latin in its dominant position and that dominance gradually eroded in favour of English once again over time. However, a closer look shows that the evolution is neither universal nor straightforward. Ingrid Ivarsen’s work on Anglo- Saxon legislation, for instance, reveals a much more complex evolution, from an initial
multilingualism partly obscured by later transmission, through a mostly monolingual English phase under the reign of Alfred, to a newly multilingual period, where Wulfstan of York once again makes use of Latin (Ivarsen 2021).
Multilingualism can also be examined in terms of language contact. How much did the
languages of medieval England influence each other? Which parts of the language were more readily influenced and to what extent is it possible to trace the paths taken by linguistic innovations spurred on by language contact? In many general descriptions of the History of the English language, French is assumed to be the language of the upper class and to have exerted an influence especially on areas connected to an aristocratic lifestyle. However, recent studies have demonstrated the influence of French vocabulary in various occupational domains, proving that “French evidently exerted influence not only on the language of social elite pursuits, but also on that of the technology relating to everyday occupations” (Ingham, Sylvester & Marcus, 2019).
The materiality of the languages of medieval England is also worth examining. To what extent does the language of coins and inscribed objects differ from language preserved on parchment? Why use runes on parchment? How different are scribal practices from one language to another? Which conventions of writing can be said to be language-independent (see for instance Laura Wright’s work on abbreviations in business writings, 2011)?
For this issue of Études Médiévales Anglaises, we welcome papers on all aspects of linguistic diversity in Medieval England.

The papers, written in English or in French, must be sent before December 15th, 2022 to Elise Louviot (elise.louviot@univ-reims.fr). Études Médiévales Anglaises uses double-blind peer review. The stylesheet to be used may be found on our website: https://amaes.jimdo.com/submit-a-paper/

All papers published with us are made open access after a two-year embargo and indexed by the MLA bibliography. You may consult our editorial policy here: https://amaes.jimdofree.com/editorial-policy/

Genders and Sexualities in History series seeking proposals

The Palgrave series Genders and Sexualities in History (edited by Joanna Bourke, Sean Brady and Matthew Champion) is seeking proposals for monographs, edited collections and collections of source material relating to the history of premodern genders and sexualities. Previous titles in the series include Cordelia Beattie and Kirsten A. Fenon’s edited collection Intersections of Gender, Religion and Ethnicity in the Middle Ages, Yuki Terazawa’s Knowledge, Power, and Women’s Reproductive Health in Japan, 1690–1945, and Nancy McLoughlin’s Jean Gerson and Gender: Rhetoric and Politics in Fifteenth-Century France. Interested contributors or editors are invited to contact Matthew Champion (mscha@unimelb.edu.au) to discuss projects and the process for making a proposal. For further information see: https://link.springer.com/series/15000

Extended Deadline for PMRG conference abstracts

The deadline for submissions for the PMRG annual conference- ‘Colonialism: subaltern voices, contested histories, subverted spaces’ has been extended to the 22nd August 2022

For further information please see the conference website: https://conference.pmrg.org.au/

Forgotten Cistercians

Forgotten Cistercians

Contact: Jason R Crow (jason.crow@monash.edu)
Modality: In person
At the 2022 Cistercian & Monastic Studies Conference, several forgotten Cistercians, including Eutropious Proust, and Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz, and Sophia were re-introduced, proving and elucidating the broad influence of the Cistercian community outside of the twelfth-century boundaries that often delimit our research. Many intriguing Cistercians remain to be re-discovered. Continuing the effort, launched by Jean Traux last year, this panel seeks to further identify and spark interest in the lives and accomplishments of unnoticed Cistercians, regardless of their time period or location. Of particular interest, are those individuals, like Boccone and Lobkowitz, whose writings intersect theology and science.


The deadline for paper proposals is Thursday, 15 September 2022.
Attachments include: 
(1) Detailed list of sessions with descriptions and organizers’ contact information plus instructions 
(2) Paper Proposal Form
(3) Instructions for submitting paper proposals to the Congress website (from WMU)  The official Call for Papers for the Congress and complete list of Congress sessions can be found here: https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/inperson-sessions.

CFP: The Animate Cosmos in Cistercian Theology and Speculative Naturalism

The Animate Cosmos in Cistercian Theology and Speculative Naturalism

Contact: Jason R Crow (jason.crow@monash.edu)
Modality: In person
Spirituality of the world belongs to both creation theology and soteriology. Drawing on sources going back to the Timaeus, and on their lives with the Psalms, the Cistercians, dwelling in monastic microcosms, articulated Christological meaning for the world’s goodness in the lives of repentant sinners ranging from a world with beatific potential to a well-defined sense of the cosmos as good in itself and good for the soul that seeks divine unification. This panel seeks papers that explore what the cosmological understandings of world offer Cistercian theology, might offer contemporary philosophies of the environment, regardless of time period or location.

The deadline for paper proposals is Thursday, 15 September 2022.

Attachments include:
(1) Detailed list of sessions with descriptions and organizers’ contact information plus instructions
(2) Paper Proposal Form
(3) Instructions for submitting paper proposals to the Congress website (from WMU)
The official Call for Papers for the Congress and complete list of Congress sessions can be found here: https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/inperson-sessions.

Call for Papers: Masculinities and Law in Premodern Europe

Call for Papers: Masculinities and Law in Premodern Europe
Online conference, 15-17 November 2022 (three half-days)

From the twelfth century onwards, a new class of legally trained professionals was enabling profound political and social change as part of increasingly specialised judicial systems. Feminist scholarship has stressed the role of gender in this transformation, with attention to women’s experiences of justice and to the regulation of ‘vices’ such as prostitution and sodomy. However, gender is often overlooked in standard legal histories and accounts of the early legal professions.

This conference aims to draw on the history of masculinities; studies of women, gender and the law; legal history; and feminist legal scholarship to examine masculinities, law and the legal professions in the premodern European world, c.1100-c.1700. The scope is broad, encompassing canon, civil, common, and customary law; and Christian, Jewish, and Muslim legal traditions.

Possible themes include (but are not limited to):
How did men as law-finders and lawmakers construct and perform gender identity?
Authority, legitimacy and gender in premodern judicial thought
Becoming a ‘man of law’: education and disciplinary practices in universities and elsewhere
Masculine institutions: Lawyers’ guilds, the Inns of Court, the French Basoche etc.
Contesting masculinities in the courtroom: lawyers, litigants, jurors and others
Gender in the operation of legal processes and practices
Gendering the spaces of the law
Legal approaches to ‘deviant’ or disruptive masculinities; sexual misconduct and violence
Lawyers, books, literacy, Latinity – gendering access to and production of legal knowledge
Representations of lawyers and judges in drama, literature, art, memorial culture etc.
Historiographical, methodological and theoretical concerns

We invite proposals for individual 20-minute papers or panels/roundtables. Submissions are welcome from scholars at all career stages, including graduate students and independent researchers.

For individual papers: Submit a 250-word abstract and title, and a brief bio.
For panels/roundtables: Submit a single 500-word abstract and title for the session, and brief presenter bios.

Please send proposals to masculinitiesandlaw@gmail.com by 31 August 2022.

Follow us on Twitter @Mascs_and_Law or for further information, please contact conference convener Dr Amanda McVitty, Massey University e.a.mcvitty@massey.ac.nz

CFP: Australasian Society for Continental Philosophy Annual Conference

The ASCP provides a broad intellectual forum for scholars working within or in communication with continental philosophy and European philosophical traditions. We welcome papers from philosophers, non-philosophers and anti-philosophers working in any discipline, from diverse backgrounds at any stage of their career.

Details about the 2022 annual conference:
University of Melbourne
28 – 30 November

Keynote Speakers:
Claire Colebrook (Penn State)
Guilia Sissa (UCLA), co-sponsored by the Australian Women’s and Gender Studies Association
Jessica Whyte (UNSW)

Deadline for submissions: 15 August.


For more details as well as submission guidelines, please go to www.ascp.org.au/conference

The 2022 ASCP conference this year will be part of the Congress of the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. www.chass.org.au/congress

Conference Queries: 2022ascp@gmail.com

You can find us on
Web: http://www.ascp.org.au/
Facebook: https://bit.ly/ascpfbgroup
Twitter: https://bit.ly/ascptweets

Religious Disbelief and the Emotions CfP

This conference seeks applications for papers of 15-20 minutes concerning the interactions between religious disbeliefs and the emotions in any location or time period up to 1800 C.E.

The conference is hosted by Macquarie University and the Macquarie Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. The conference will be online-only, via Zoom. It is scheduled for 23 and 24 January 2023 at times of day that, it is hoped, will be amenable as much as possible to participants from various locations. Sessions will be recorded and published online for any conference participants to attend concurrently.

Throughout history, religious disbelievers have expressed themselves, sometimes in stark terms with strong emotions. Their beliefs may interact with or stem from emotions responding to hegemonic religious narratives and thought worlds. This conference seeks to bring together experts from a large variety of fields of historical and literary inquiry to help us better understand the extent to which interplays between religious disbeliefs and the emotions vary or remain similar in different time periods, locations, individuals, religious and cultural milieux, textual (or material) genres, and so on.

The time frame for the conference is as follows:
-July 2022: publication of CfP
-31 October 2022: deadline for proposals
-15 November 2022: notification of outcomes to proposals
-23-24 January 2023: online conference
-30 April 2023: deadline for submission of written papers

Please email proposals to kegan.brewer@mq.edu.au. Proposals should be 200-300 words, and include a brief bio of 100-200 words. Any questions about the conference can also be directed to the same email address. Thank you!

Call for Submissions: Metropolitan Museum Journal

Call for Submissions: Metropolitan Museum Journal

The Editorial Board of the peer-reviewed Metropolitan Museum Journal invites submissions of original research on works of art in the Museum’s collection.

The Journal publishes Articles and Research Notes. All texts must take works of art in the collection as the point of departure. Articles contribute extensive and thoroughly argued scholarship, whereas research notes are often smaller in scope, focusing on a specific aspect of new research or presenting a significant finding from technical analysis. The maximum length for articles is 8,000 words (including endnotes) and 10–12 images, and for research notes 4,000 words with 4–6 images.

The process of peer review is double-anonymous. Manuscripts are reviewed by the Journal Editorial Board, composed of members of the curatorial, conserva­tion, and scientific departments, as well as external scholars.

Articles and Research Notes in the Journal appear both in print and online, and are accessible via MetPublications and the Journal’s home page on the University of Chicago Press site.

The deadline for submissions for Volume 58 (2023) is September 15, 2022.

Submission guidelines: www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/met/instruct

Please send materials to: journalsubmissions@metmuseum.org

Inspiration from the Collection: www.metmuseum.org/art/collection

View the Journal: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/loi/met

CFP: Going Places, Mobility, Migration, Exile, Space and Emotions

Third Biennial Conference for the Society for the History of Emotions
Florence, 30 August – 2 September 2022

The Third Biennial Conference of the Society for the History of Emotions (SHE) will focus on mobility, migration, exile, traversing of space, and emotions. The current, at times heated debates about migration in Europe, Australia, North America and elsewhere necessitate a profound and critical historical contextualisation, especially from a history-of-emotions point of view. Hope, fear, hatred, empathy, all manner of feelings shape peoples’ movements around the globe and the ways in which newcomers are heartily welcomed, coldly brushed off or fiercely attacked. Using archival, literary and other sources, this conference will explore the emotions that motivate people to go elsewhere, and the emotional responses of displaced peoples and the communities they orbit and join.

We call for papers and panels investigating case studies that concern the movement of people and their feelings about places and other people, from homesickness to wanderlust, from belonging to estrangement. We also want to discuss the political, economical and emotional conditions that instigate transnational movements and inform how men and women cope with and react to these mobilities.

We’ll engage with how people who have been socialised in different emotional communities learn to read each other’s emotional gestures and utterances; and will examine the affective entanglement between diasporic communities, their homelands and host communities. In short, we aim to bring research on migration and mobility to bear on the historical study of emotions, and vice versa.

We shall accept papers and panels on the following topics, as well as other potentially relevant topics not listed below:
• explorers, travellers and tourists
• dynamics of emigration, immigration and remigration
• itinerant workers
• slavery and indentured labour
• movements of colonising and colonised subjects
• feelings of inclusion and exclusion, of longing and alienation
• letters and other means by which people maintain affective bonds across countries
• migratory experiences of racism and emotional coping strategies
• emotional practices and narratives of welcome or rejection
• memory, memoires, writing practices related to experiences of migration, displacement, exile
• literary and other accounts of emotional practices linked to separation, return, nostalgia, melancholy, etc.
Chronologically, papers can delve into the ancient, the medieval and early modern, or the modern period. In geographical terms we welcome contributions on local, regional or global mobilities in areas across the world. Transdisciplinary contributions are welcome.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Proposals should consist of a title, abstract of up to 300 words and a short bio, to be sent via email as a pdf attachment to SHEFlorence22@gmail.com by 1 March 2022. We also accept proposals for panels of three papers, which should include all of the above for each presenter, a panel title and abstract for the panel itself and, if possible, the name and short bio of the panel chair.


Participants will be notified by late March 2022.