Tag Archives: Seminar

Nov 24 CEMS End of Year Reception: Evening with Matthew Winterbottom

The ANU Centre for Early Modern Studies is pleased to welcome Matthew
Winterbottom, Curator of Western Art Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, as our special guest for the final CEMS event for 2022. Matthew has extensive expertise in early modern European decorative arts across diverse media and in the history of cabinets of curiosity.

Join CEMS for an evening in conversation with Matthew followed by drinks, in-person on the ANU campus. This is the first in-person seminar held by CEMS and promises to be a wonderful evening for our members and wider audience to meet and mingle before the end of year.

Matthew Winterbottom is Curator of Western Art Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Ashmolean Museum. His research interests cover a wide range of European decorative arts from the late medieval to the early twentieth centuries, and he has expertise in furniture, ceramics, glass and textiles and sculpture, with a particular interest in 17th- and 18th-century British and European silver and goldsmiths’ work. He is actively researching the Michael Wellby bequest – a collection of 500 pieces of Continental goldsmiths’ work and Kunstkammer objects – that was bequeathed to the Ashmolean Museum in 2012. Matthew has extensive knowledge of the history of Kunstkammern, Schatzkammern and cabinets of curiosities of the early modern period and of the revival of interest in such collections in the 19th and 20th centuries that led to the extensive faking and reproduction of precious objects.

Matthew has over 25 years’ experience working with and researching European decorative arts and is committed to exploring ways of making this material engaging and accessible to museum visitors. He has held curatorial roles at the Victoria & Albert Museum, the Royal Collection and the Holburne Museum in Bath. He joined the Department of Western Art in the Ashmolean Museum in March 2014 as Curator of Nineteenth-Century Decorative Arts where he was tasked with building a new collection of Nineteenth-Century decorative arts and redisplaying the Nineteenth-Century Art Galleries. Since January 2017, he has been responsible for the entire Western Art Sculpture and Decorative Arts Collections.

Matthew is at ANU in November as an international visitor at the ANU School of Art and Design funded by the ANU Research School of Humanities and the Arts.

This event is presented by the Centre for Early Modern Studies

For further information and to register please see: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/anu-centre-for-early-modern-studies-end-of-year-reception-tickets-459403597527

CEMS ANU Online Seminar – Helen Hills, “Desiring Silver: Saving Souls, Travelling Light, and the Other Side of the Coin.” June 15

“Desiring Silver: Saving Souls, Travelling Light, and the Other Side of the Coin.”

Centre for Early Modern Studies, Australian National University Online Seminar 2 2022, Wednesday 15 June 9:00 am (BST); 6.00 pm (AEST); 4:00am EDT.

Please join us to hear Helen Hills, Professor Emerita of History of Art at the University of York, speak on her current research project on silver: “Silver is particularly fraught, agile and transformative material. Embedded in power relations, coloniality, and matters of refinement, early modern silver was a particularly generative site. Might its peculiar paradoxes be usefully thought in terms of a materiality of trauma? I will consider this through the lens of silver in Naples, capital of the Spanish empire in Europe.” The seminar will be followed by a Q&A discussion and run for 75 minutes.

Time: Wednesday 15 June 9:00 am (BST); 6.00 pm (AEST); 4:00 am (EDT). Time/date converter

Register to receive a link for the event (and the event recording). Eventbrite registration.


ANU Seminar: “Patterns, Outliers, and Teasers: Reception of Early Modern Women’s Writing”

Centre for Early Modern Studies, ANU, Seminar 1, 2022: On-line, April 26, 6pm.
“Patterns, Outliers, and Teasers: Reception of Early Modern Women’s Writing”

Please join us to hear Marie-Louise Coolahan, Professor of English at the National University of Ireland Galway, present the ‘big-picture’ findings emerging from the European Research Council-funded project that she led: RECIRC: The Reception and Circulation of Early Modern Women’s Writing, 1550-1700 (https://recirc.nuigalway.ie), followed by a Q&A.

Date: Tuesday 26th April 9.00 am (IST) 6.00-7.15 pm (AEST).

Register here: Eventbrite registration link.

2022 Aotearoa Gender History Network

This is a regular, online seminar. Each session (held via zoom) features 2 x 10–12-minute research presentations on current research in Gender History with a focus on Aotearoa New Zealand, followed by discussion. Please be in touch if you would like to present your own research – we have speaking slots available on Wednesday Rāapa 7 September.

Wednesday Rāapa 16 March, 12 pm – 1 pm, via zoom
Zoom link: https://waikato.zoom.us/j/97078105588


Speakers:
Amelia Barker
PhD Candidate, Massey University

Constance de Rabastens (d. c.1386): a woman who fought to be heard
Constance de Rabastens was a lay female visionary during the Great Western Schism (1378-1417), a period in which Western Christendom was divided between two rival papacies, and political and religious differences divided communities and even families. Unlike most female visionaries at the time, Constance’s visions supported the “wrong” pope for her region, and she was forbidden from recording her experiences. Despite this, she fought to be heard by religious authorities, challenging their decisions, and eventually disappearing after being arrested. Her recorded letters and visions reveal her agency in making her voice heard, providing historians with a clear example of how medieval women were not just silent witnesses of great political and religious turmoil in their communities, but actively engaged and desperate to influence those in power.

Amanda McVitty
Lecturer in History, Massey University

Sexual regulation and the evolution of patriarchal judicial culture: Towards a feminist history of the legal profession
In his now-classic study, Robert Moore stressed the pivotal role of lawyers in transforming premodern Europe into a ‘persecuting society’ that was heavily invested in surveilling and regulating moral and sexual ‘vice’. This new project centres lawyers’ gendered agency in this process, asking how and to what extent these men created and enabled a patriarchal judicial culture in which were born ‘sticky’ myths and stereotypes about sexual misconduct, rape and gendered violence, and about those who perpetrate it. Using feminist methods, I aim to transform the way we think about and teach this legal history across the premodern-modern divide.

Coming up next:
Wednesday Rāapa 4 May, 12 pm – 1 pm, via zoom

Speakers:
Hayley Goldthorpe, Te Herenga Waka Victoria University of Wellington
The Three Graces against the Taranaki War, 1860-61

Rachel Caines, Australian Catholic University
Interrogating Gender through First World War Propaganda Posters


ANZAMEMS 2022 Conference: Reception and Emotion Update!

We are pleased to announce that ANZAMEMS’ upcoming 2022 conference will now be a hybrid conference, with both online and in-person presentation and attendance catered for. The conference will be held from 27–30 June 2022!

Because of this, we have decided to extend the CFP and the new closing date for applications will be 10 January 2022! Applications for Bursaries & Prizes are open, and the closing date for them has also been extended to 10 January 2022.

Keep an eye out for some exciting upcoming details, including a conference dinner, in person excursions, and panels and exhibitions for both online and in person attendees!

For more details, including the Call for Papers, details of the ANZAMEMS Seminar, and all Prizes and Travel Bursaries on offer, please visit the conference website: https://www.anzamems2021.com

SEMINAR: Robbie Richardson (Princeton), “The Souls of Departed Utensils”: Death and Indigenous Material Culture in Eighteenth Century Britain

Please join us for CEMS ANU Seminar Two presented by Robbie Richardson, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Princeton University, who will speak on

The Souls of Departed Utensils”: Death and Indigenous Material Culture in Eighteenth Century Britain.
Register to attend: Eventbrite

If you are unable to attend the live event, please register to receive a notification for the recording afterwards.

TIME/DATE: 19:00, Wednesday, 27 October (NYC); 10:00 Thursday, 28 October (Canberra/Sydney)

Our Inaugural Seminar, What is Early Modern History?, with Professor Merry Wiesner-Hanks, is now available to view online at our YouTube channel. The Centre for Early Modern Studies, Australian National University, brings together researchers and HDRs from the disciplines of history, literary studies, art and design, theatre and performance history, languages, linguistics, music, and the digital humanities who study the long early modern period (1450-1800). Sign up for our newsletter, follow us on Twitter @AnuCems, or see our website to read about current projects and future events.

History on Wednesday Seminar series, University of Sydney

“Serendipitous findings: about the unexpected appearance of a daughter of King Arthur in a thirteenth-century piece of Spanish hagiography”

25 August | Hélène Sirantoine

12:10-1:30pm

Scholars finding themselves reading the late thirteenth-century Life of the Blessed Leander and Isidore, archbishops of Seville, Fulgentius, archbishop of Écija, and Braulio, bishop of Zaragoza might be surprised, as was the presenter of this talk, to find in it a puzzling detail. Among the eccentric kinship relations with which the author filled their text, a Visigothic queen, wife of King Reccared (586–601) and mother of King Liuva II (601–603), was made into no less than the “daughter of King Arthur”. But who was really Reccared’s spouse? And how come that, centuries later, some hagiographer imagined making her the offspring of famous, and legendary, King Arthur? Answering these questions led this bemused investigator to examine a wide range of materials, spanning from the sixth to the eighteenth century. This paper traces the steps of this investigation, the longue durée of this medieval legend, and reflects on the role played by serendipitous findings in the making of history.

Hélène Sirantoine is a senior lecturer in history at the University of Sydney. She researches Iberian medieval history with a focus on written culture, especially historiography, hagiography and pragmatic texts as tools of communication and memorialisation. Sirantoine is the author of Imperator Hispaniae: les idéologies impériales dans le royaume de León, IXe-XIIe siècles (Madrid, 2012) and she co-edited with Julio Escalona Chartes et cartulaires comme instruments de pouvoir: Péninsule Ibérique et Occident chrétien, VIIIe-XIIe siècles (Toulouse, 2013) and the two first volumes of the series Epistola (Madrid, 2018) dedicated to epistolary practices in medieval Iberia.

You will be able to Join Zoom from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android
Password: History1

For further information on this talk and further talks in this series, please see the website.

Centre for Early Modern Studies ANU Inaugural Seminar

What is Early Modern History?

Please join us in person or through the Zoom platform for our Inaugural Seminar on Tuesday July 13, when Professor Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks will talk about her latest book, What Is Early Modern History?, which was published in March in the Polity ‘What Is History?’ series.

The work offers a concise guide to historical research from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, within and beyond Europe, including subfields and approaches to the period. She will discuss how she conceptualized and wrote it, and the ways this changed while writing during the COVID pandemic. The seminar will be followed by a Q&A and discussion.

See the following flier for further information: