Tag Archives: conference

ANZAMEMS 2022 Conference CFP – Panel on Aesthetics in Medieval and Early Modern Poetry

We invite scholarly proposals for papers on aesthetics in medieval and early modern poetry (c. 400 to 1800), as part of a panel or panels being established at ANZAMEMS 2022. The link to the main website and call for papers is here: https://www.anzamems2021.com/

The panel(s) will examine the influence of aesthetic styles, movements, rhetorical and aesthetic techniques and theories on the development of poetry, or the work of specified poet(s) at any time during the relevant periods in Europe and Britain. Papers should be set within the broader topic of the overall conference, and deal with questions of reception and/or emotion. Speakers might consider:

· The role of emotions in medieval or early modern aesthetic theories;

· Models of embodiment in aesthetic theories during the period;

· Theories of affect, affectus and/or feelings;

· The impact of theological and biblical sources (for example, by Augustine and Aquinas);

· The impact of philosophy of mind/body, metaphysics and ethics (such as the Platonic and Aristotelian);

· Formal theories of poetics and rhetoric, including the role of style in rhetorical figures and tropes;

· The impact of artistic movements (such as Neoplatonist, Neoclassical, Baroque) and the reciprocal influence of visual arts on poetry (eg ut pictura poiesis);

· Public and private models of ‘taste’, audience and reception;

· The role of pleasure, the imagination and sensuous and vivid imagery;

· Techniques for the aestheticization of the sacred (such as the poetics of enigma);

· Theories of the sublime and the beautiful;

· Participatory versus objectivist aesthetics;

· Materialist, or transcendental and idealist models;

· Poststructural or psychoanalytic approaches; or

· The role and value of historicist and/or modern theory.

We invite submissions for 20 minute presentations, followed by 5 minutes of Q&A. If you are interested in presenting your work, please send any questions, or otherwise the title, a 200 word abstract and a 50 word biography, at the first instance to Dr Jane Vaughan at jane.vaughan@uwa.edu.au

Deadline for Panel Submissions: 12 October 2021

The panel(s) will be held as part of the biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, at the School of Humanities, The University of Western Australia, Perth, 27 June to 1 July, 2022

CFP: Reception, Emotion, and the Crusades, panels at ANZAMEMS Conference, 27 June–1 July 2022

The theme for the 2022 ANZAMEMS (Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies) conference is ‘Reception and Emotion’. Professor Megan Cassidy-Welch (Australian Catholic University) and Dr Beth Spacey (University of Queensland) are inviting proposals for 20-minute papers to be part of a strand of themed panels examining aspects of reception and/or emotion, broadly conceived, in a crusading context. Please send your 200-word abstracts and paper title, along with a short bio (max. 50 words), to Beth (b.spacey@uq.edu.au) by 30 September 2021.

The thirteenth biennial ANZAMEMS Conference will be held on 27 June to 1 July 2022 in Perth at the University of Western Australia. More information, including details regarding travel bursaries, is available here.

Classical Reformations: Beyond Christian Humanism, Online conference hosted by the Warburg Institute, 2-3 Sep. 2021

Convenors: Dr Micha Lazarus and Dr Lucy Nicholas (Warburg Institute)

Christian humanism has dominated the story of classical reception in Reformation Europe, as the first Erasmian generation of reformers retooled classical texts to Christian ends. Yet the utility of the classical tradition to later generations of reformers has been largely overlooked by modern scholarship. We propose that as the Reformation evolved, the influence of classical learning was as likely to flow in the other direction: that the literature and ideas of the ancient world had a formative influence on Christian politics and theology. Major Reformation figures—from Melanchthon, Sturm, Ascham, and Beza, to many of their Catholic opponents, such as Pole and Bellarmine—were scholars by day, as comfortable with Catullus as Corinthians. Their classical learning actively empowered and shaped the formulation of Christian faith during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Classical Reformations: Beyond Christian Humanism explores how the literature and ideas of the classical world calibrated early modern Christianity—its interpretation, ordinances, moral instruction, politics, theology, cultural expression, and polarizing impulses of confessionalisation. How did classical learning fill the gaps in the Lutheran rejection of Catholic doctrine? How did classical poetry and drama shape the Roman Church’s popular outreach after the Council of Trent? How did classical history and rhetoric inflect the turbulent politics of the Reformation? Looking beyond the Christian absorption of pagan material and Erasmian humanism redux, this conference focuses instead on a classical Christianity, even a Greco-Roman monotheism, in the generations after Erasmus. Where recent scholarship has replaced confessionalism at the heart of early modern philology, we aim to replace classicism at the heart of theology and religious politics. The classical tradition was too ubiquitous and authoritative a presence in early modern intellectual life to have left theology untouched.

This international conference will take place online over two days, hosted by the Warburg Institute. Speakers include leading and upcoming scholars from Belgium, Canada, Croatia, Denmark, France, Hong Kong, Italy, Spain, the United States, and the United Kingdom, and a keynote address will be given by Prof. Ralph Keen (University of Illinois at Chicago).

The event is free via Zoom with advance registration. For further information please see the website.

CFP Fourth Power of the Bishop Conference

The fourth Power of the Bishop conference to be held at Sarum College, Salisbury, May 30-31, 2019. This time, the Power of the Bishop team are joining with the Episcopus Society for the 2019 conference, exploring the theme of Episcopal Patronage from Late Antiquity to c.1500. We want to put together thematic panels that compare and contrast uses, abuses and outcomes of bishops as patrons across time and geographical boundaries

We are looking for papers that explore, but are not limited to:

* Art and architecture

* Music and Liturgy

* Manuscripts and Literary Culture

* Saint Cults and Pilgrimage Routes

* Education and Social Advancement

* Socio-political networks, the advancement of families and individuals

* When episcopal patronage goes wrong – the failures and abuses of episcopal patronage and its results

Abstracts should be no more than 500 words.

This year we are accepting abstracts in English, Italian and French. 

**If selected then papers and book chapters must be in English**

Email abstracts to: powerofthebishop@gmail.com with the subject line ABSTRACT POB4 by no later than 1 February 2019.

For more information and to register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/pob-4-the-medieval-bishop-as-patron-tickets-53543735755

Joint George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference, Auckland, July 2020

‘France and beyond: the Global World of ‘Ngāti Wīwī’,  7-10 July 2020, Auckland. 
(Tribe ‘Oui Oui’ was the local name for the French in New Zealand.) This first ever Joint George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference will be held in Auckland, hosted by the Universities of Auckland and Massey. Co-presidents Tracy Adams (French) and Kirsty Carpenter, and Treasurer Joe Zizek invite colleagues in History and the Humanities to engage with the themes and the visitors that the conference will bring to New Zealand. Leading scholars from the US, UK and Europe will be keynote guests, and many American and international colleagues have already signalled their intention to attend.

The conference invites panels and papers on any aspect of French History, Medieval to Contemporary (a detailed call for papers will be circulated soon). Areas of traditional French historical research will be featured alongside popular themes: Citizenship in the Medieval and Early Modern European world; the Revolutionary period and its environmental impact in the wider Atlantic world; and changing approaches to French or Franco-British History in the NZ/Australasian and Pacific region – in what the French call Océanie.

Contacts for information:

Tracy Adams t.adams@auckland.ac.nz

Kirsty Carpenter K.Carpenter@massey.ac.nz

Joe Zizek j.zizek@auckland.ac.nz

CFP 20th Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference

Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium

The 20th Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference, with the theme of Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium, will be held at Macquarie University, Sydney, July 19-21 2019.

Keynote speakers:
Professor David Olster (University of Kentucky)
Title: The Idolatry of the Jews and the Anti-Judaizing Roots of Seventh- and Early Eighth-Century Iconoclasm
Associate Professor Jitse Dijkstra (University of Ottawa
Title: The Avenging Sword?  Imperial Legislation Against Temples in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries

The Byzantine empire was rarely a stable and harmonious state during its long and eventful history.  It was often in strife with those outside its borders and with those within them, and with so much power invested in its political and ecclesiastical structures it was ready to implode at times.  This could result in persecution and the silencing of dissident voices from various quarters of society.  The mechanisms by which the authorities controlled civil disorder and dissent, as well as discouraging criticism of imperial policies, could be brutal at times.  In what sense was it possible, if at all, to enjoy freedom of speech and action in Byzantium?  Was the law upheld or ignored when vested interests were at stake?  How vulnerable did minorities feel and how conformist was religious belief at the end of the day?  The theme of the conference aims to encourage discussion on a number fronts relating to the use and abuse of power within the history of Byzantium.  Individual papers of 20 mins or panels (3 papers) will be accepted on the following or related themes:

·         The rhetoric of persecution in hagiography and historiography

·         Monastic dissidence and dissidents

·         The persecution of minorities

·         Dissension in the military

·         Imperial usurpation and sedition

·         Discourses of violence and tyranny in literature

·         Popular uprisings and civil disobedience

·         Satire and literary subversion

·         Laws relating to prosecution and capital punishment

·         Depictions of persecution in Byzantine art

·         Slavery and manumission

·         The forced baptism of Jews and others

·         Heresy and the imposition of religious orthodoxy

·         The suppression and oppression of women

·         Persecution of philosophers and other intellectuals

·         Anti-pagan policies

·         Forced migrations and resettlements – Manichaeans and Paulicians

·         The liturgical celebration of martyrdom

Abstracts of 500 words should be emailed to the President of AABS, Dr Ken Parry: conference@aabs.org.au by the due date of 7 January 2019.

Panel convenors should outline briefly their theme (100 words), and (a) add all three abstracts to their application, or (b) list the three speakers on their panel with their own abstract, plus (c) nominate a chairperson.  Panelists should indicate clearly the title of their proposed panel if submitting their abstracts individually.

Acceptances will be despatched by 25 January 2019.

http://www.aabs.org.au/conferences/20th/