Tag Archives: CFP

CfP: Unsettling Certainties, Conference of the Society for the History of Emotions

The call for papers for the Society for the History of Emotions’ Fourth Biennial Conference, under the theme ‘Unsettling Certainties’ is now open! The conference will take place at the University of Adelaide over 28 November to 1 December 2023

To live in uncertain times is to consider the possibilities of past, present and future anew. What was known, is reopened for question, and the possible futures built on such knowing become pressing concerns. Foundations are shaken, certainties unsettled, and people moved. The term ‘emotion’, with its etymological roots in the motions of public disturbance, is suggestive of the close affiliation between feelings, passions and embodied experiences and our encounters with certainty and its disruption. This conference, hosted by the Society for the History of Emotions, considers the theme of ‘Unsettling Certainties’ as an opportunity to explore how attending to emotion enables a richer understanding of the known and the unknowable, change and continuity, the fixed and fluid, crisis and stasis, past and future, not least as everyday and embodied experiences.

We call for proposals that address this theme, embracing a broad range of perspectives. Offerings might consider the theoretical, methodological and epistemological boundaries of emotions associated with certainty and uncertainty; shifting definitions and interpretations of emotions and emotion words; the social, economic, political and cultural dimensions of emotional encounters during certain and uncertain times, including changing values and beliefs, public disturbances, crises, and experiences of the ‘end of the world’; the evolving health and wellbeing impacts on individuals and groups, including in relation to gender, race, class and religion; the representation and reimagining of un/settled feelings in literature, art, music, philosophy and science; environmental and ecological perspectives; and creativity and imagination as responses to change and new futures. 

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, emotions in relation to:
– Certainty and the assured
– Risk, uncertainty and the unknown
– Security, comfort and stability
– Anxiety and worry
– Epistemologies and beliefs
– Imagination and boundaries of the real
– The natural and supernatural
– End of the old and encounters with the new
– Crisis, challenge and transformation
– Creativity, expression, and evolution
– Hope, activism and community building
– Moving places and fixed spaces
– Infirmity and death

We welcome submissions from scholars of all levels for any time period, geography, and scholarly discipline, including inter- and transdisciplinary contributions. Papers that do not address the core theme will be considered, but may be given a lower priority, if space is limited.

Proposals can take the form of:
– Individual papers of 20 minutes’ duration;
– 90-minute panels or roundtables, that should include time given to discussion; – Posters.

If you would like to propose an alternative format, please approach the organisers to discuss. We hope to offer a hybrid option for virtual attendees. Please note if you need this on your abstract.

Please send a Word document with a title and 250-word abstract for each paper/poster proposed and a two-sentence biography and email address for each speaker. For panels and roundtables, please also send an overarching title and short rationale and identify the main correspondent for communications.

Proposals should be emailed to unsettlingcertainties@gmail.com Deadline for call for papers: 1 March 2023

Conference organisers: Katie Barclay, Diana Barnes, Keagan Brewer, Sonia Cancian, Michael Champion, Vesna Drapac, Kirk Essary, Michael Heim, Grace Howe, James Kane, Meagan Nattrass, and Claire Walker

Postgraduate and Early Career Paper Prize

The best paper presented by a postgraduate or early career researcher will have the opportunity to win an essay prize worth $100 and to have an article based on the paper considered for publication in Emotions: History, Culture, Society.

Applicants must be within five years after award of the PhD (extended to seven years if not in stable university employment or with significant career interruptions).

To be considered for this prize, participants must signal their wish to be considered when they submit their abstract. They must also submit a written version of the paper by the 25 November 2023. Judges will base their decision both on the presentation and the written version received.

Attention Early Career Researchers!

Aspire to deliver a keynote lecture at a major international conference? We invite early career researchers (ECRs) to propose a keynote lecture addressing the conference theme. This scheme is open to all disciplines of expertise that address the conference theme, and to researchers in university employment as well as those who are not.

Applicants must:
• Have an outstanding track record relative to opportunity;
• Be within five years after award of the PhD (extended to seven years if not in stable university

employment or with significant career interruptions).

To apply, please submit a proposed titled, an abstract of 300-400 words, a bio and a CV (3 pages max) to unsettlingcertainties@gmail.com by 1 March 2023.

In selecting this keynote, consideration will be given to diversity and broad representation among the group of keynotes. We also reserve the right to seek third-party testimony as to the researcher’s capacity to speak and deliver scholarly presentations. The winning keynote lecturer will have flights, accommodation and registration covered. It is anticipated that an article based on the paper would be published in Emotions: History, Culture, Society, subject to peer review.

CFP: Histories of Metallurgy and Metal Material Culture

Join “Histories of Metallurgy and Metal Material Culture,” in-person and online at the Australian National University on Friday 18 November, 2022.

This symposium hosted by the ANU Centre for Art History and Art Theory aims to generate cross-disciplinary dialogue about how we interpret metal in ancient and historical societies. Researchers in history, art history, archaeology, archaeometry, curatorship and creative practice will present papers which adopt diverse approaches to investigating the production, fabrication, meanings and interpretation of metals and metal material culture across chronologies and geographies.

For details and to register: https://soad.cass.anu.edu.au/events/histories-metallurgy-metal-material-culture

CFP: Gender and Emotion in Japanese Christianity (1549-1638)

Gender and Emotion in Japanese Christianity (1549-1638)
GENDER AND WOMEN’S HISTORY RESEARCH CENTRE
International Hybrid Workshop
7 February 2023

The Gender and Women’s History Research Centre at the Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences at the Australian Catholic University invites you to submit an abstract for a workshop on Christianity in Sengoku and Tokugawa Japan, with a focus on two themes that have been overlooked by past literature: emotions and gender.

The workshop will be held on 7th February 2023 (AEDT) in hybrid mode, at the ACU Fitzroy Campus in Melbourne, Australia and online. We are thrilled to announce that Professor Haruko Nawata Ward (Columbia Theological Seminary) will be the opening keynote.

We are seeking a selection of papers that engage with gender and/or emotions in the context of Christianity in Japan, from 1549 to 1638. As the performance of gender and feelings is deeply connected, the workshop will give special attention to the intersections of gender and emotions in the work of the Catholic missions in Japan, to fully flesh out the experiences of those who lived and engaged with Japanese Christianity.

Additionally, we would like to form a panel that offers a comparative perspective with other early modern Christian missions, so abstracts on the workshop’s themes that consider different geographical contexts are welcome too. We are in discussions to publish the full articles prepared from the workshop presentations in a special issue of an international, high-ranked journal.

KEY INFORMATION
– Please send an abstract of 200 words and a short bio in English, by the 13th of November 2022, to linda.zampoldortia@acu.edu.au and jessica.oleary@acu.edu.au .
– Draft papers of approx. 3000 words will be due mid-January, to be circulated among the participants. Full papers to submit for publication will be due approximately six months after the workshop.
– Travel bursaries are available for scholars based in Australia. Please indicate in your application if you would like to be considered. International Hybrid Workshop 7 February 2023

CONVENORS:
– Dr Linda Zampol D’Ortia Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow
– Dr Jessica O’Leary Research Fellow

Call for Papers: Histories of Metallurgy and Metal Material Culture, Australian National University

Call for Papers: Histories of Metallurgy and Metal Material Culture, Australian National University, 18-19 November. Deadline for abstracts 14 October.

The ANU Centre for Art History and Art Theory invites submissions for a cross-disciplinary symposium dedicated to current research into ancient and historical metallurgy and metal material culture.

This symposium aims to foster links between Australian scholars across disciplines, including but not limited to history, art history, conservation, Classical studies and archaeology. We welcome submissions for papers and posters on current or recently completed projects relating to any aspect of the use of metals in ancient and historical societies around the world.

Examples include:
• technical and archaeometallurgical studies
• early and historical extractive metallurgy and metalworking
• individuals, industries, institutions etc. associated with metallurgy and metalwork
• object biographies
• the role of metals in societies, whether economic, symbolic or otherwise.

Please submit abstracts of 250 words no later than Friday 14th October 2022: https://soad.cass.anu.edu.au/news/call-papers-histories-metallurgy-metal-material-culture

CFP: The Languages of Medieval England

The French Journal of Medieval English Studies Études Médiévales Anglaises is seeking
submissions for its 102nd issue focusing on “the Languages of Medieval England”. The papers, written in French or English, should be submitted to Elise Louviot by December 15th, 2022 (see more information below). Authors who wish to submit a paper are advised to get in touch and submit a title with a brief description of content as soon as convenient.
It is a well-known fact that Medieval England, like most places at any given time in human history, was multilingual. The languages of Medieval England are many: Brittonic, Latin, English, Old Norse and French, to name but the most important, and each item on that list can be further subdivided into several varieties (along geographical, but also sociological & stylistic lines).
Examining the languages of Medieval England requires us to think of how they interacted and related to each other, from a number of perspectives.
From a sociolinguistic perspective, it is worth investigating the respective statuses of these languages. Who used them? For what purposes? What was the meaning of using a certain language in this or that context? For instance, the broad lines of the interplay between English and Latin throughout the period are well-known: Old English gradually challenged the dominant status of Latin as the official written language; the Conquest re-instated Latin in its dominant position and that dominance gradually eroded in favour of English once again over time. However, a closer look shows that the evolution is neither universal nor straightforward. Ingrid Ivarsen’s work on Anglo- Saxon legislation, for instance, reveals a much more complex evolution, from an initial
multilingualism partly obscured by later transmission, through a mostly monolingual English phase under the reign of Alfred, to a newly multilingual period, where Wulfstan of York once again makes use of Latin (Ivarsen 2021).
Multilingualism can also be examined in terms of language contact. How much did the
languages of medieval England influence each other? Which parts of the language were more readily influenced and to what extent is it possible to trace the paths taken by linguistic innovations spurred on by language contact? In many general descriptions of the History of the English language, French is assumed to be the language of the upper class and to have exerted an influence especially on areas connected to an aristocratic lifestyle. However, recent studies have demonstrated the influence of French vocabulary in various occupational domains, proving that “French evidently exerted influence not only on the language of social elite pursuits, but also on that of the technology relating to everyday occupations” (Ingham, Sylvester & Marcus, 2019).
The materiality of the languages of medieval England is also worth examining. To what extent does the language of coins and inscribed objects differ from language preserved on parchment? Why use runes on parchment? How different are scribal practices from one language to another? Which conventions of writing can be said to be language-independent (see for instance Laura Wright’s work on abbreviations in business writings, 2011)?
For this issue of Études Médiévales Anglaises, we welcome papers on all aspects of linguistic diversity in Medieval England.

The papers, written in English or in French, must be sent before December 15th, 2022 to Elise Louviot (elise.louviot@univ-reims.fr). Études Médiévales Anglaises uses double-blind peer review. The stylesheet to be used may be found on our website: https://amaes.jimdo.com/submit-a-paper/

All papers published with us are made open access after a two-year embargo and indexed by the MLA bibliography. You may consult our editorial policy here: https://amaes.jimdofree.com/editorial-policy/

Extended Deadline for PMRG conference abstracts

The deadline for submissions for the PMRG annual conference- ‘Colonialism: subaltern voices, contested histories, subverted spaces’ has been extended to the 22nd August 2022

For further information please see the conference website: https://conference.pmrg.org.au/

Forgotten Cistercians

Forgotten Cistercians

Contact: Jason R Crow (jason.crow@monash.edu)
Modality: In person
At the 2022 Cistercian & Monastic Studies Conference, several forgotten Cistercians, including Eutropious Proust, and Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz, and Sophia were re-introduced, proving and elucidating the broad influence of the Cistercian community outside of the twelfth-century boundaries that often delimit our research. Many intriguing Cistercians remain to be re-discovered. Continuing the effort, launched by Jean Traux last year, this panel seeks to further identify and spark interest in the lives and accomplishments of unnoticed Cistercians, regardless of their time period or location. Of particular interest, are those individuals, like Boccone and Lobkowitz, whose writings intersect theology and science.


The deadline for paper proposals is Thursday, 15 September 2022.
Attachments include: 
(1) Detailed list of sessions with descriptions and organizers’ contact information plus instructions 
(2) Paper Proposal Form
(3) Instructions for submitting paper proposals to the Congress website (from WMU)  The official Call for Papers for the Congress and complete list of Congress sessions can be found here: https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/inperson-sessions.

CFP: The Animate Cosmos in Cistercian Theology and Speculative Naturalism

The Animate Cosmos in Cistercian Theology and Speculative Naturalism

Contact: Jason R Crow (jason.crow@monash.edu)
Modality: In person
Spirituality of the world belongs to both creation theology and soteriology. Drawing on sources going back to the Timaeus, and on their lives with the Psalms, the Cistercians, dwelling in monastic microcosms, articulated Christological meaning for the world’s goodness in the lives of repentant sinners ranging from a world with beatific potential to a well-defined sense of the cosmos as good in itself and good for the soul that seeks divine unification. This panel seeks papers that explore what the cosmological understandings of world offer Cistercian theology, might offer contemporary philosophies of the environment, regardless of time period or location.

The deadline for paper proposals is Thursday, 15 September 2022.

Attachments include:
(1) Detailed list of sessions with descriptions and organizers’ contact information plus instructions
(2) Paper Proposal Form
(3) Instructions for submitting paper proposals to the Congress website (from WMU)
The official Call for Papers for the Congress and complete list of Congress sessions can be found here: https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/inperson-sessions.

Call for Papers: Masculinities and Law in Premodern Europe

Call for Papers: Masculinities and Law in Premodern Europe
Online conference, 15-17 November 2022 (three half-days)

From the twelfth century onwards, a new class of legally trained professionals was enabling profound political and social change as part of increasingly specialised judicial systems. Feminist scholarship has stressed the role of gender in this transformation, with attention to women’s experiences of justice and to the regulation of ‘vices’ such as prostitution and sodomy. However, gender is often overlooked in standard legal histories and accounts of the early legal professions.

This conference aims to draw on the history of masculinities; studies of women, gender and the law; legal history; and feminist legal scholarship to examine masculinities, law and the legal professions in the premodern European world, c.1100-c.1700. The scope is broad, encompassing canon, civil, common, and customary law; and Christian, Jewish, and Muslim legal traditions.

Possible themes include (but are not limited to):
How did men as law-finders and lawmakers construct and perform gender identity?
Authority, legitimacy and gender in premodern judicial thought
Becoming a ‘man of law’: education and disciplinary practices in universities and elsewhere
Masculine institutions: Lawyers’ guilds, the Inns of Court, the French Basoche etc.
Contesting masculinities in the courtroom: lawyers, litigants, jurors and others
Gender in the operation of legal processes and practices
Gendering the spaces of the law
Legal approaches to ‘deviant’ or disruptive masculinities; sexual misconduct and violence
Lawyers, books, literacy, Latinity – gendering access to and production of legal knowledge
Representations of lawyers and judges in drama, literature, art, memorial culture etc.
Historiographical, methodological and theoretical concerns

We invite proposals for individual 20-minute papers or panels/roundtables. Submissions are welcome from scholars at all career stages, including graduate students and independent researchers.

For individual papers: Submit a 250-word abstract and title, and a brief bio.
For panels/roundtables: Submit a single 500-word abstract and title for the session, and brief presenter bios.

Please send proposals to masculinitiesandlaw@gmail.com by 31 August 2022.

Follow us on Twitter @Mascs_and_Law or for further information, please contact conference convener Dr Amanda McVitty, Massey University e.a.mcvitty@massey.ac.nz

CFP: Australasian Society for Continental Philosophy Annual Conference

The ASCP provides a broad intellectual forum for scholars working within or in communication with continental philosophy and European philosophical traditions. We welcome papers from philosophers, non-philosophers and anti-philosophers working in any discipline, from diverse backgrounds at any stage of their career.

Details about the 2022 annual conference:
University of Melbourne
28 – 30 November

Keynote Speakers:
Claire Colebrook (Penn State)
Guilia Sissa (UCLA), co-sponsored by the Australian Women’s and Gender Studies Association
Jessica Whyte (UNSW)

Deadline for submissions: 15 August.


For more details as well as submission guidelines, please go to www.ascp.org.au/conference

The 2022 ASCP conference this year will be part of the Congress of the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. www.chass.org.au/congress

Conference Queries: 2022ascp@gmail.com

You can find us on
Web: http://www.ascp.org.au/
Facebook: https://bit.ly/ascpfbgroup
Twitter: https://bit.ly/ascptweets