Category Archives: ANZAMEMS

CFP Parergon Special Issue 2023

The ANZAMEMS journal Parergon, in print since 1971, regularly produces one open issue and one themed issue annually. Recent and forthcoming themed issues include:


2018, 35.2 Translating Medieval Cultures Across Time and Place: A Global Perspective, guest-edited by Saher Amer, Esther S. Klein, and Hélène Sirantoine
2019, 36.2 Practice, Performance, and Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Cultural Heritage, guest-edited by Jane-Heloise Nancarrow and Alicia Marchant
2020, 37.2 Representing Queens, guest-edited by Stephanie Russo
2021, 38.2 Children and War, guest-edited by Katie Barclay, Dianne Hall and Dolly Mackinnon
2022, 39.2 Cultures of Compassion in Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Music, guest-edited by Diana Barnes

We now call for proposals for a future themed issue, specifically for 2023 (40.2). Proposals for the 2023 issue (40.2) should be submitted to the Editor by Tuesday 1 December 2020.

Please send enquiries and proposals to the Editor, Susan Broomhall, at
susan.broomhall@uwa.edu.au


For more information please see the attached PDF.

ARC Humanities and ANZAMEMS Book Prizes

ANZAMEMS, in partnership with ARC Humanities Press, is delighted to announce the launch of two major new book prizes exclusively tailored to ANZAMEMS members. Each prize consists of a book contract with ARC Humanities Press and a grant of $10,000 AUD to cover the costs of gold open access.

The ANZAMEMS-ARC Humanities Award for Original Research is aimed at Early Career Researchers and independent scholars. Where relevant, the winner of the Prize will benefit from ARC Humanities expert advice on converting a PhD thesis to a monograph. The Award for Original Research is an annual prize. Applications for 2021 are now open and will close on 29 January, 2021.

The Borderlines Award is aimed at promoting scholarship with particular strengths in opening up new territorial perspectives, subject-areas, or interdisciplinary methods. The Borderlines Award is a biennial prize and will first be awarded in 2022, with applications closing at the end of January 2022.

Please find attached below the conditions for each prize. More details and application forms are available on the Prizes and Bursaries page of the ANZAMEMS website.


Highlights from the Parergon Archives: Words as Weapons

We asked members of Parergon‘s Early Career Committee to tell us about a Parergon article that stood out for them and why they found it valuable for their research. In this post, Francesca Battista discusses Kathleen Neal’s ‘Words as Weapons in the Correspondence of Edward I with Llywelyn ap Gruffydd’, Parergon 30.1 (2013), pp. 51-71 [DOI: 10.1353/pgn.2013.0051]

The one-day workshop on Letter Writing in the Middle Ages, held at the Bush House, King’s College London in 2019 and organized by Simon Thomas Parsons, Thomas W. Smith and Anaïs Waag, not only offered a great opportunity to be engaged in interesting debates on medieval epistolary culture, but it also allowed me to meet brilliant scholars and hear about their meaningful work. A stimulating exchange of ideas after the conference with one of the attendees, Amanda McVitty, and the paper presented by Kathleen Neal, introduced me to valuable scholarship on dictamen and related areas of study from Australia and New Zealand, which was unknown to me. Neal’s article that I am going to discuss in this post is part of this story. Her research method represents a great source of inspiration for the dictaminal research I am conducting.

The influence of ars dictaminis on the shaping of chancery style in England was long ago recognized by Kantorowicz, Denholm-Young, and more recently pointed out by Camargo, Richardson, and Grévin, among others. However, the investigation of the ways in which from the thirteenth century dictamen started to be used as a royal political communication tool is still not fully explored.

Neal’s article provides a relevant contribution to the field of investigation, offering a compelling reading of the letters exchanged between Edward I of England and Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of Wales, during the time period between the Anglo-Welsh wars (1276-77, 1282-83). This correspondence is read drawing attention to its dictaminal shape and interconnected political intent. Furthermore, it also illustrates a method based on the study of the epistolary drafting process for interpreting royal letters, not as “relics of a well-developed medieval bureaucracy,” but rather “as episodes of strategic communication” (p. 52).

The article concentrates on a single letter which is offered as an example of how Edward I’s letters functioned as rhetorical political artifacts in connection to the Anglo-Welsh struggle. It is a royal reply of 1280 to one or two of Llywelyn’s letters which were concerned, above all, with the issue of the possession of Arwystli region. The Treaty of Aberconwy of 1277, which marked the capitulation of Llywelyn to Edward I, left open the Welsh dispute over this land. As a result, rights to it were claimed equally by the Prince of Wales and Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn, ally of the king. In his letters addressed to the king, Llewelyn complains because the king was not able to settle this dispute in his Parliament. Such criticism resulted in an indirect aggression to the heart of Edward I’s monarchy.

Neal brilliantly shows how Edward’s reply appears to be a rhetorical means of legitimization of the manner of power execution in the hands of the superior party. Accordingly, for example, in the salutatio the address terms of “beloved and faithful”, which were used in line with the Anglo-Norman epistolary practices rather than on the basis of those of the Welsh chancery, stress the Prince of Wales’ subordination to the king and also show who “was willing to conduct their discussion” (p. 61).

Likewise, the hypertrophic narratio would suggest “that a hostile reception was anticipated” and indicates “how important it was in royal and Chancery circles that an English construction of the situation be articulated” (p. 61). It could be also argued that the length of the narratio is an especially significant aspect to be considered as a clear transgression of dictaminal norms. Handbooks of letter writing prescribed that narration had to be brief and concise, and English artes dictandi were not an exception. One of the most relevant merits of this article is its attentive examination of the editorial work involved in the production of this letter. Edward’s letter survives as a draft and all the draft’s changes and deletions represent a conscious use of language which is itself political. Notably, despite the fact that their consideration is necessary for a complete reading of the letter, they had been neglected in previous research. An edition and a translation of the letter, along with the annotation of the deletions and additions in the apparatus, are for the first time provided in the appendix of this article.

In conclusion, as shown by Neal, royal letters extant in the form of draft or not, can be regarded as a fruitful place for the investigation of the monarchy’s dictaminal construction of power. This applies to 13th century Britain, as in the specific case of this paper, but it could be extended to a European level to other royal chanceries. For the richness of its investigation, this article represents a wide range of scholarly interests. It can be especially recommended to historians of medieval Britain and Europe, specialists of dictamen, scholars of political communication and kingship, and researchers of medieval textuality and scribal activity.

Parergon can be accessed via Project MUSE (from Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). For more information on the current issue and on submitting manuscripts for consideration, please visit https://parergon.org/

Parergon 37.1

Parergon volume 37.1, featuring eight scholarly articles and 50 reviews and short notices, has now been published on all platforms except Project MUSE, where it will appear in July. 

Print copies will be posted to ANZAMEMS members from mid-June. The contents of the volume are posted below:

Download (PDF, Unknown)

CFP Aesthetics in Early Modern Poetry at #ANZA21

We invite scholarly proposals for papers on aesthetics in medieval and early modern poetry (c. 400 to 1800), as part of a panel or panels being established at ANZAMEMS 2021

The panel(s) will examine the influence of aesthetic styles, movements, rhetorical and aesthetic techniques and theories on the development of poetry, or the work of specified poet(s) at any time during the relevant periods in Europe and Britain. Papers should be set within the broader topic of the overall conference, and deal with questions of reception and/or emotion. Papers might consider:

• The role of emotions in medieval or early modern aesthetic theories;
• Models of embodiment in aesthetic theories during the period;
• Theories of affect, ‘affectus’ and/or feelings;
• The impact of theological and biblical sources (for example, by Augustine and Aquinas);
• The impact of philosophy of mind, body, morality and ethics (such as Platonic and Aristotelian);
• Formal theories of poetics and rhetoric, including the role of style in poetic and rhetorical figures and tropes;
• The impact of artistic movements (such as Neoplatonist, Neoclassical, Baroque) and the reciprocal influence of visual arts on poetry (eg ut pictura poesis);
• Public and private models of ‘taste’, audience and reception;
• The role of pleasure, the imagination and sensuous and vivid imagery;
• Techniques for the aestheticization of the sacred (such as the poetics of enigma);
• Theories of the sublime and the beautiful;
• Participatory versus objectivist aesthetics;
• Materialist, or transcendental and idealist models;
• Poststructural or psychoanalytic approaches; or
• The role and value of historicist and/or modern theory.

We invite submissions for 20 minute presentations, followed by 5 minutes of Q&A. If you are interested in presenting your work, please send the title, a 200 word abstract and a 50 word biography, at the first instance to Dr Jane Vaughan at jane.vaughan@uwa.edu.au

Deadline for Panel Submissions: 30 June 2020

The panel(s) will be held as part of the biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, at the School of Humanities, The University of Western Australia, Perth, 8 to 12 February, 2021.

If you have any questions, please contact Dr Jane Vaughan at jane.vaughan@uwa.edu.au

ANZAMEMS AGM

The Annual General Meeting of ANZAMEMS Inc. will be held on Tuesday 28 April 2020 at 11:00am-1:00pm (AWST).

The meeting is hosted by The University of Western Australia and will be held via the video conferencing software Zoom.

Local times (for your convenience):
WA: 11:00am-1:00pm (AWST)
SA: 12:30pm-2:30pm (ACST)
VIC/NSW/TAS/ACT/QLD: 1:00pm-3:00pm (AEST)
New Zealand: 3:00pm-5:00pm (NZST)

Details of the Zoom connection will be circulated to members closer to the AGM date.

At the upcoming ANZAMEMS AGM a number of committee positions need to be elected. This email is also a call for nominations for the following positions:

Communications Officer
Parergon Reviews Editor
Postgraduate Officer (Australia)
Postgraduate Officer (New Zealand)

In addition, the following positions are declared open and can also be contested. The incumbents have all declared their willingness to remain in the positions, but if you wish to contest the position, then you may:

Secretary (Current incumbent: Karen Jillings)
Vice-President (Australia) (Current incumbent: Clare Monagle)
Treasurer (Current incumbent: Peter Sherlock)
Committee Member (Current incumbent: Helen Young)

If you wish to nominate for any of these positions on the ANZAMEMS committee, please send the Executive Administrator Marina Gerzic (info@anzamems.org) an email with your name, affiliation, and short biographical statement (please note: you must be a 2020 financial member to nominate), as well as the names of your nomination proposer and a seconder (please note: both must be 2020 financial members) by Wednesday 18 March 2020 at the latest.

Once the Executive Administrator has received nominations, a proxy form for those unable to attend the AGM to vote on these positions will be created and circulated.

Please note: names of nominees will only be printed on the proxy forms if they are submitted by the 18 March deadline.

Please contact the Executive Administrator for any further information about any of these committee positions.

ANZAMEMS 2021 Bursaries and Prizes

Applications for the following ANZAMEMS 2021 conference bursaries and prizes are now open:

ANZAMEMS Conference Travel Bursaries

To enable current or recent Postgraduates and Early Career Researchers who are currently not in full-time employment to attend the ANZAMEMS Biennial Conference and deliver a paper at a session, travel bursaries will be offered.

Bursaries will be awarded on a competitive basis and are scaled on the basis of distance from the venue (up to $300 for recipients travelling from regional WA; $500 from other Australian states and territories; and $1000 for those travelling internationally). Delegates from Perth are ineligible to apply.

It is not expected that Conference Convenors will be able to offer a bursary to every eligible applicant. In the event of there being more eligible applicants than can be supported, the ANZAMEMS Conference Committee will rank applicants according to distance travelled, financial need, current employment status, and access to other sources of funding.

Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary

One of the conference bursary applicants will be selected for the Kim Walker Travel Bursary, which is awarded in honour of Kim Walker, who taught in the English program at Victoria University of Wellington. The prize is currently set at $AUD 500.

Postgraduate students from New Zealand who have applied for a Travel Bursary before the relevant deadline will automatically be considered for the Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary. A separate application is not necessary.

George Yule Essay Prize

The George Yule Prize is awarded to the best essay written by a postgraduate. It is awarded biennially, at each ANZAMEMS Conference. The winner will receive a travel bursary for assistance in attending the conference, $AUD 500 in prize money, and a year’s free subscription to Parergon.

For more information and application forms please see https://www.anzamems2021.com/busaries-prizes

The deadline for all bursary and prize applications is 31 July 2020.

CFP ‘Reception, Emotion and the Royal Body’ panel at #ANZA21

This panel will convene at the Thirteenth Biennial Conference of the Australia and
New Zealand Association of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (#anza21), to be
held at The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, from 8-12 February
2021. https://www.anzamems2021.com/

The idea of the ‘king’s two bodies’, a duality predicated on the idea that a
monarch possessed two bodies, a body natural and a body politic–the former
mortal, the latter an embodiment of both the nation and the authority of
sovereignty–has long been of interest to scholars of medieval and early modern
monarchies.

The body of a monarch remains a contest site, with the life, health, fertility, and
sexuality of kings or queens continuing to be an important part of politics. Royal
scandal graces the covers of newspapers and magazines and trends on social
media, and royal weddings, births, and deaths continue to capture the public’s
imagination and interest.

We seek papers that examine the significance of the royal body, in particular, the
reception of the royal body across time periods, cultures, and media and how
royal bodies both convey and elicit emotions:

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
• Historiography
• Iconography and representation
• Drama and literature
• Political theory
• Divine bodies
• Rituals and ceremony
• Effigies and monuments
• Age, health and pregnancy
• Fertility, chastity, virility
• Royal births and deaths
• Christenings, coronations, weddings and funerals
• Regicide
• Royal touch
• Deformity and disability
• Royal Dress
• Sex and Scandal
• Gender
• Sexuality
• Race
• Medievalism and early-modernism
• Performance
• Audiences
• Popular culture
• Film and television
• Comics and graphic novels
• Fandom
• Celebrity

Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:
1. A title
2. An abstract (max. 200 words)
3. A short biography (max. 50 words)

Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) to:
mgerzic@gmail.com by 30 June 2020.

ANZAMEMS Seminar: Call for Expressions of Interest

The committee of ANZAMEMS 2021 is delighted to Call for Expressions of Interest in the
ANZAMEMS Seminar ‘Vectors of Emotion’, which will precede the conference on
Monday 8 February 2021 from 11am–4pm (lunch and afternoon tea will be included).

Seminar Leader: Assoc. Prof Kathryn Prince (The University of Western Australia).

About the Seminar

Drama relies on the palpable circulation of emotions onstage and in the audience, which is
one reason for its reliable function as a vector of emotion between the moment of its creation
and of its performance. Working with medieval and early modern scripts, participants in this
Seminar will apply various History of Emotions approaches to the performance of selected
scenes in order to develop an understanding of the emotional practices within plays of
various genres, styles, and periods from the medieval to the early modern.

No performance skills are required or expected, and the workshop is designed to engage
anyone with an interest not only in theatre but also in cultural and intellectual history,
scholarly editing, music, art, and literature. Participants will gain an understanding of the
relationship between theories of emotions and their practice, both in performance and more
broadly.

Because this Seminar will involve various kinds of active participation, applicants should
advise the organiser of any accessibility requirements, which will be quietly and cheerfully
accommodated.

How to Apply

Expressions of Interest should consist of:

  1.  Your name, institutional affiliation, and year of HDR candidacy (MA, MRes, PhD) or
    ECR status (with priority to those who have not yet found permanent employment);
  2. Your field/s of research;
  3. A 250-word statement explaining your interest in participating in the Seminar and
    how you believe participation will assist your research and/or career development;
  4. Any accessibility requirements.

Please email Expressions of Interest for the ANZAMEMS Seminar (as a Word document
attachment) to: anzamems2021@gmail.com (with the email title ‘Vectors of Emotions
Seminar Application’) by 31 July 2020.

CFP ANZAMEMS 2021

The Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies
conference committee seeks proposals for its 2021 conference on the theme ‘Reception and
Emotion’, to be held in Perth, Australia at The University of Western Australia from 8–12
February.

The committee welcomes all approaches to topics related to ‘reception and emotion’ broadly
conceived (and conceived either together or separately: i.e., on reception and emotion, or on
either reception or emotion), including but not limited to: trans-cultural, trans-temporal,
trans-disciplinary, translation, global studies, creative misreadings, theatrical and literary
revivals, forgeries, homages, cultural counter-strikes, regimes of periodisation, etc. We
welcome proposals considering the usefulness or otherwise of reception history as a
methodology: is ‘transformation’ more helpful than ‘reception’, for example, for appreciating
the active role of the audience of a text, play, or idea?

Work on emotions can be similarly broad, covering, e.g., what’s evidenced from the
‘receivers’ and from the ‘received’ (thinking of work, for example, on how Indigenous
people have received missionaries and their doctrines; how medievalists have reacted and
acted in relation to the worrying associations of their discipline; even how humanities
scholars feel about their reception in contemporary political circles; Jan Plamper’s suggestion
that historians should keep ‘field diaries’ about their personal response to work in the
archives; are there ‘objective’ studies?). What’s been the value and downside of the
‘emotional turn’ in humanities studies? How do we as scholars of the past deal with presentist
notions of ‘relevance’, and need we consider past scholarship as ‘outdated? How can we
marry approaches from humanities and life sciences in ‘emotions history’?

Call for Papers

The conference committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, 90-minute themed panels
(of no more than 4 speakers) or workshops. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The reception of ideas about emotion in medieval/early modern texts;
  • Reception and transformation of ideologies across time and space;
  • The emotions of an audience in the reception of a play or sermon;
  • The emotional impact of a text on a reader;
  • Rituals and practices of receiving guests and dignitaries (and their emotional
    effects?);
  • The reception of the past: medievalism and early-modernism;
  • The reception of bodies / emotions and bodies / embodiment;
  • Reception / emotion and sexuality;
  • Reception / emotion and race;
  • Reception / emotion and gender;
  • Reception / emotion and music / art

Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:

  1. A title;
  2. An abstract (max. 200 words);
  3. A short biography (max. 50 words).

The conference committee welcomes themed panel or workshop session proposals for the
conference. Proposals should consist of:

  1. Panel/Workshop Title;
  2. Proposed Chair (if available);
  3. Details of each presenter and paper as described above.

NB: Workshops will be allotted 90 minutes, 30 of which should be reserved for general
discussion. We suggest a maximum of 6 speakers.

Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) to:
anzamems2021@gmail.com. Deadline for submissions: 31 July 2020.

NB: Should you require early acceptance of your proposal please highlight this in your email
and the committee will do our best to accommodate your request.

For more information please visit the conference website.