Category Archives: ANZAMEMS

CFP Aesthetics in Early Modern Poetry at #ANZA21

We invite scholarly proposals for papers on aesthetics in medieval and early modern poetry (c. 400 to 1800), as part of a panel or panels being established at ANZAMEMS 2021

The panel(s) will examine the influence of aesthetic styles, movements, rhetorical and aesthetic techniques and theories on the development of poetry, or the work of specified poet(s) at any time during the relevant periods in Europe and Britain. Papers should be set within the broader topic of the overall conference, and deal with questions of reception and/or emotion. Papers might consider:

• The role of emotions in medieval or early modern aesthetic theories;
• Models of embodiment in aesthetic theories during the period;
• Theories of affect, ‘affectus’ and/or feelings;
• The impact of theological and biblical sources (for example, by Augustine and Aquinas);
• The impact of philosophy of mind, body, morality and ethics (such as Platonic and Aristotelian);
• Formal theories of poetics and rhetoric, including the role of style in poetic and rhetorical figures and tropes;
• The impact of artistic movements (such as Neoplatonist, Neoclassical, Baroque) and the reciprocal influence of visual arts on poetry (eg ut pictura poesis);
• Public and private models of ‘taste’, audience and reception;
• The role of pleasure, the imagination and sensuous and vivid imagery;
• Techniques for the aestheticization of the sacred (such as the poetics of enigma);
• Theories of the sublime and the beautiful;
• Participatory versus objectivist aesthetics;
• Materialist, or transcendental and idealist models;
• Poststructural or psychoanalytic approaches; or
• The role and value of historicist and/or modern theory.

We invite submissions for 20 minute presentations, followed by 5 minutes of Q&A. If you are interested in presenting your work, please send the title, a 200 word abstract and a 50 word biography, at the first instance to Dr Jane Vaughan at jane.vaughan@uwa.edu.au

Deadline for Panel Submissions: 30 June 2020

The panel(s) will be held as part of the biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, at the School of Humanities, The University of Western Australia, Perth, 8 to 12 February, 2021.

If you have any questions, please contact Dr Jane Vaughan at jane.vaughan@uwa.edu.au

ANZAMEMS AGM

The Annual General Meeting of ANZAMEMS Inc. will be held on Tuesday 28 April 2020 at 11:00am-1:00pm (AWST).

The meeting is hosted by The University of Western Australia and will be held via the video conferencing software Zoom.

Local times (for your convenience):
WA: 11:00am-1:00pm (AWST)
SA: 12:30pm-2:30pm (ACST)
VIC/NSW/TAS/ACT/QLD: 1:00pm-3:00pm (AEST)
New Zealand: 3:00pm-5:00pm (NZST)

Details of the Zoom connection will be circulated to members closer to the AGM date.

At the upcoming ANZAMEMS AGM a number of committee positions need to be elected. This email is also a call for nominations for the following positions:

Communications Officer
Parergon Reviews Editor
Postgraduate Officer (Australia)
Postgraduate Officer (New Zealand)

In addition, the following positions are declared open and can also be contested. The incumbents have all declared their willingness to remain in the positions, but if you wish to contest the position, then you may:

Secretary (Current incumbent: Karen Jillings)
Vice-President (Australia) (Current incumbent: Clare Monagle)
Treasurer (Current incumbent: Peter Sherlock)
Committee Member (Current incumbent: Helen Young)

If you wish to nominate for any of these positions on the ANZAMEMS committee, please send the Executive Administrator Marina Gerzic (info@anzamems.org) an email with your name, affiliation, and short biographical statement (please note: you must be a 2020 financial member to nominate), as well as the names of your nomination proposer and a seconder (please note: both must be 2020 financial members) by Wednesday 18 March 2020 at the latest.

Once the Executive Administrator has received nominations, a proxy form for those unable to attend the AGM to vote on these positions will be created and circulated.

Please note: names of nominees will only be printed on the proxy forms if they are submitted by the 18 March deadline.

Please contact the Executive Administrator for any further information about any of these committee positions.

ANZAMEMS 2021 Bursaries and Prizes

Applications for the following ANZAMEMS 2021 conference bursaries and prizes are now open:

ANZAMEMS Conference Travel Bursaries

To enable current or recent Postgraduates and Early Career Researchers who are currently not in full-time employment to attend the ANZAMEMS Biennial Conference and deliver a paper at a session, travel bursaries will be offered.

Bursaries will be awarded on a competitive basis and are scaled on the basis of distance from the venue (up to $300 for recipients travelling from regional WA; $500 from other Australian states and territories; and $1000 for those travelling internationally). Delegates from Perth are ineligible to apply.

It is not expected that Conference Convenors will be able to offer a bursary to every eligible applicant. In the event of there being more eligible applicants than can be supported, the ANZAMEMS Conference Committee will rank applicants according to distance travelled, financial need, current employment status, and access to other sources of funding.

Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary

One of the conference bursary applicants will be selected for the Kim Walker Travel Bursary, which is awarded in honour of Kim Walker, who taught in the English program at Victoria University of Wellington. The prize is currently set at $AUD 500.

Postgraduate students from New Zealand who have applied for a Travel Bursary before the relevant deadline will automatically be considered for the Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary. A separate application is not necessary.

George Yule Essay Prize

The George Yule Prize is awarded to the best essay written by a postgraduate. It is awarded biennially, at each ANZAMEMS Conference. The winner will receive a travel bursary for assistance in attending the conference, $AUD 500 in prize money, and a year’s free subscription to Parergon.

For more information and application forms please see https://www.anzamems2021.com/busaries-prizes

The deadline for all bursary and prize applications is 31 July 2020.

CFP ‘Reception, Emotion and the Royal Body’ panel at #ANZA21

This panel will convene at the Thirteenth Biennial Conference of the Australia and
New Zealand Association of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (#anza21), to be
held at The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, from 8-12 February
2021. https://www.anzamems2021.com/

The idea of the ‘king’s two bodies’, a duality predicated on the idea that a
monarch possessed two bodies, a body natural and a body politic–the former
mortal, the latter an embodiment of both the nation and the authority of
sovereignty–has long been of interest to scholars of medieval and early modern
monarchies.

The body of a monarch remains a contest site, with the life, health, fertility, and
sexuality of kings or queens continuing to be an important part of politics. Royal
scandal graces the covers of newspapers and magazines and trends on social
media, and royal weddings, births, and deaths continue to capture the public’s
imagination and interest.

We seek papers that examine the significance of the royal body, in particular, the
reception of the royal body across time periods, cultures, and media and how
royal bodies both convey and elicit emotions:

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
• Historiography
• Iconography and representation
• Drama and literature
• Political theory
• Divine bodies
• Rituals and ceremony
• Effigies and monuments
• Age, health and pregnancy
• Fertility, chastity, virility
• Royal births and deaths
• Christenings, coronations, weddings and funerals
• Regicide
• Royal touch
• Deformity and disability
• Royal Dress
• Sex and Scandal
• Gender
• Sexuality
• Race
• Medievalism and early-modernism
• Performance
• Audiences
• Popular culture
• Film and television
• Comics and graphic novels
• Fandom
• Celebrity

Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:
1. A title
2. An abstract (max. 200 words)
3. A short biography (max. 50 words)

Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) to:
mgerzic@gmail.com by 30 June 2020.

ANZAMEMS Seminar: Call for Expressions of Interest

The committee of ANZAMEMS 2021 is delighted to Call for Expressions of Interest in the
ANZAMEMS Seminar ‘Vectors of Emotion’, which will precede the conference on
Monday 8 February 2021 from 11am–4pm (lunch and afternoon tea will be included).

Seminar Leader: Assoc. Prof Kathryn Prince (The University of Western Australia).

About the Seminar

Drama relies on the palpable circulation of emotions onstage and in the audience, which is
one reason for its reliable function as a vector of emotion between the moment of its creation
and of its performance. Working with medieval and early modern scripts, participants in this
Seminar will apply various History of Emotions approaches to the performance of selected
scenes in order to develop an understanding of the emotional practices within plays of
various genres, styles, and periods from the medieval to the early modern.

No performance skills are required or expected, and the workshop is designed to engage
anyone with an interest not only in theatre but also in cultural and intellectual history,
scholarly editing, music, art, and literature. Participants will gain an understanding of the
relationship between theories of emotions and their practice, both in performance and more
broadly.

Because this Seminar will involve various kinds of active participation, applicants should
advise the organiser of any accessibility requirements, which will be quietly and cheerfully
accommodated.

How to Apply

Expressions of Interest should consist of:

  1.  Your name, institutional affiliation, and year of HDR candidacy (MA, MRes, PhD) or
    ECR status (with priority to those who have not yet found permanent employment);
  2. Your field/s of research;
  3. A 250-word statement explaining your interest in participating in the Seminar and
    how you believe participation will assist your research and/or career development;
  4. Any accessibility requirements.

Please email Expressions of Interest for the ANZAMEMS Seminar (as a Word document
attachment) to: anzamems2021@gmail.com (with the email title ‘Vectors of Emotions
Seminar Application’) by 31 July 2020.

CFP ANZAMEMS 2021

The Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies
conference committee seeks proposals for its 2021 conference on the theme ‘Reception and
Emotion’, to be held in Perth, Australia at The University of Western Australia from 8–12
February.

The committee welcomes all approaches to topics related to ‘reception and emotion’ broadly
conceived (and conceived either together or separately: i.e., on reception and emotion, or on
either reception or emotion), including but not limited to: trans-cultural, trans-temporal,
trans-disciplinary, translation, global studies, creative misreadings, theatrical and literary
revivals, forgeries, homages, cultural counter-strikes, regimes of periodisation, etc. We
welcome proposals considering the usefulness or otherwise of reception history as a
methodology: is ‘transformation’ more helpful than ‘reception’, for example, for appreciating
the active role of the audience of a text, play, or idea?

Work on emotions can be similarly broad, covering, e.g., what’s evidenced from the
‘receivers’ and from the ‘received’ (thinking of work, for example, on how Indigenous
people have received missionaries and their doctrines; how medievalists have reacted and
acted in relation to the worrying associations of their discipline; even how humanities
scholars feel about their reception in contemporary political circles; Jan Plamper’s suggestion
that historians should keep ‘field diaries’ about their personal response to work in the
archives; are there ‘objective’ studies?). What’s been the value and downside of the
‘emotional turn’ in humanities studies? How do we as scholars of the past deal with presentist
notions of ‘relevance’, and need we consider past scholarship as ‘outdated? How can we
marry approaches from humanities and life sciences in ‘emotions history’?

Call for Papers

The conference committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, 90-minute themed panels
(of no more than 4 speakers) or workshops. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The reception of ideas about emotion in medieval/early modern texts;
  • Reception and transformation of ideologies across time and space;
  • The emotions of an audience in the reception of a play or sermon;
  • The emotional impact of a text on a reader;
  • Rituals and practices of receiving guests and dignitaries (and their emotional
    effects?);
  • The reception of the past: medievalism and early-modernism;
  • The reception of bodies / emotions and bodies / embodiment;
  • Reception / emotion and sexuality;
  • Reception / emotion and race;
  • Reception / emotion and gender;
  • Reception / emotion and music / art

Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:

  1. A title;
  2. An abstract (max. 200 words);
  3. A short biography (max. 50 words).

The conference committee welcomes themed panel or workshop session proposals for the
conference. Proposals should consist of:

  1. Panel/Workshop Title;
  2. Proposed Chair (if available);
  3. Details of each presenter and paper as described above.

NB: Workshops will be allotted 90 minutes, 30 of which should be reserved for general
discussion. We suggest a maximum of 6 speakers.

Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) to:
anzamems2021@gmail.com. Deadline for submissions: 31 July 2020.

NB: Should you require early acceptance of your proposal please highlight this in your email
and the committee will do our best to accommodate your request.

For more information please visit the conference website.

Reminder: Western Civilisation in the Twenty-First Century Registration

Registration for the ANZAMEMS symposium ‘Western Civilisation in the Twenty-First Century’, held 20-21 February 2020 at the University of Adelaide, is free and open until 14 February. Registration can be completed via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/western-civilisation-in-the-twenty-first-century-tickets-79997658149

The full schedule can be viewed here: https://westernciv2020.wordpress.com/schedule/

Parergon 36.2 Preview: Myth, Reality and Revelation: The Performance of Divine Power on Dartmoor

We asked contributors to the current issue of Parergon to give us some additional insights into their research and the inspirations for their articles. In this post, David C. Harvey, Associate Professor in Critical Heritage Studies at Aarhus University, Denmark, discusses the article he co-wrote with Joanne Parker, Associate Professor of Victorian Literature and Culture at the University of Exeter, UK: ‘Myth, Reality and Revelation: The Performance of Divine Power on Dartmoor’. DOI: 10.1353/pgn.2019.0056

Just a few weeks after I first came to Exeter University as an undergraduate student in October 1988, I remember being taken by Vic Ambler, the Warden of the St Lukes Hall of Residence, for an evening walk to Dartmoor. We got dropped off near Challacombe, and walked via Grimspound, the Headland Warren and Bennett’s Cross to the Warren House Inn. Just before we reached the pub, we walked past the Devil’s Playing Cards; four mysteriously shaped fields laid out on the hillside, in the shape of the four suits of a deck of playing cards. I remember Vic telling a story about how these got their name: that during a Great Storm, the Devil crashed through the roof of the Church at nearby Widecombe-in-the-Moor and carried off a man called Jan Reynolds who was playing cards at the back of the Church. As he flew across the moor, Jan dropped the four aces that he had up his sleeve and they fell to earth as four enclosures. I squinted at the hillside – OK; I could pick out the Diamond quite clearly… perhaps the Heart; but one needed to have a bit more imagination to make out the Club and the Spade. It was a good story – though I would have thought that the Devil would have been happy with someone playing cards at the back of a Church Service?

The walk, across Hameldown, between Widecombe and Warren House is one of my favourites, and the legend about the Devil is a nice story to impress visitors. It might even place me as a ‘local’, or at least as someone who ‘knows’ the Dartmoor landscape. Over the following years, I became more and more familiar with Dartmoor and its legends; lots about the Devil, many about ‘hauntings’, and a good few about environmental hazards – deep bogs or terrible storms. Indeed, there’s a story about a ‘Great Storm’ of 1638, written up on a series of tablets in the Nave of Widecombe Church, in which several people were killed – victims of God’s Judgement. I vaguely realised that the Devilish Legend about the Playing Cards was referring to the same storm event as the tragedy of 1638 in Widecombe, but never really followed up on how and why the two stories were connected.

In the Autumn of 2013, I was to run a 3rd year day field trip to Dartmoor to talk about landscape history and archaeology. The Headland Warren, Bennett’s Cross and the Devil’s Playing Cards was an obvious destination to take a group of third years in the Autumn Term of 2013, and all my Landscape Knowledge or Lore comes into its own when running such a student field trip. The legend of the Devil will be memorable for the students – just as it was for myself in 1988 – and if that helps to instil the ‘factual’ elements of landscape history, then all the better. On Friday 18th October 2013, I led a group of 35 students up to Dartmoor, as part of the Undergraduate Level 3 ‘Geographies of Heritage and Memory’ module within the Geography Department at Exeter.

I wrote a blog about this field trip here – and was struck by the juxtaposition of the two stories about the ‘Great Storm’. Of course, the students also asked some tricky questions – surely, they ask me, the Devil should have been happy that people were playing cards in Church(!); and how come the figure of ‘God’ turned directly into the figure of the Devil. These loose ends needed tidying up….

I re-visited the Church at Widecombe and took some photos of the tablets on the wall of the Nave. This story was very clear – that it was God that brought on the Great Storm and God’s Judgement that carried off several parishioners.

I also began talking to my colleague in the English Department, Joanne Parker, who had previously written about Dartmoor stories and legends. We had been working together within the ‘Past-Place’ research team, at Exeter, and so the idea of producing a ‘life history’ of storytelling associated with an event such as the Great Storm took hold.

Together, we started to patch together the accounts of the Great Storm, of October 1638, from the first pamphlet publications only a couple of weeks after, through renditions in poetic and prose form during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, and to their re-deployment in tourist legend in the 19th and 20th centuries. The first accounts of the event appeared in London in November 1638, and in this version, the storm is very much associated with God’s Judgement – though we also found the vestiges of some quasi-scientific reflection and interest. The Devil gets a mention in the 18th century, but only starts to dominate the accounts in the 19th century – which is the point at which the stone enclosures (the Devil’s Playing Cards) near the Warren House Inn enter the scene.

Just as my imagination was captivated in 1988 – and just as I have recounted it to many visitors in the last 30 years – the legend of the Devil has good currency through which to support ‘insider’ credentials. In some ways, its slightly comical and clearly mythical nature provides a gloss of specifically ‘local’ landscape knowledge. It is a story of ‘place making practice’, both over the last 380 years over which the legends have been circulated, and also the 30 years over which I have been telling the stories myself – as a ‘professional landscape historian’. And over the last 6 years, the blog on a WordPress site has now become a published journal article!

All images belong to the author.

Parergon can be accessed via Project MUSE (from Volume 1 (1983)), Australian Public Affairs – Full Text (from 1994), and Humanities Full Text (from 2008). For more information on the current issue and on submitting manuscripts for consideration, please visit https://parergon.org/

Western Civilisation in the Twenty-First Century: Registration and Programme

A reminder that registration for the ANZAMEMS symposium ‘Western Civilisation in the Twenty-First Century’, held 20-21 February 2020 at the University of Adelaide, is open until 14 February. A provisional programme is now available here.

Registration is free via Eventbrite. All details can be found on the symposium website: westernciv2020.wordpress.com 

New issue preview: Parergon 36.2

ANZAMEMS is delighted to advise researchers that the latest issue of the Association’s journal Parergon is now out. Special Issue 36.2, Practice, Performance and Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Heritage, guest-edited by Alicia Marchant and Jane-Héloïse Nancarrow, features 6 original research articles, a scholarly introduction, a special roundtable contribution, and over 50 book reviews.

ANZAMEMS members will receive print copies of Parergon 36.2 shortly, while digital content can be accessed via Project MUSE.

Here is a preview of the content available in the issue:

Introduction: Practice, Performance, and Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Heritage
Alicia Marchant, Jane-Héloïse Nancarrow

Between Realism and Re-enactment: Navigating Dramatic and Musical ‘Problems’ in Voyage to the Moon
Joseph Browning and Jane W. Davidson

How do practitioners understand the relationship between performance, history and emotion in Western art music? Based on an ethnographic study of a contemporary pasticcio opera, we take the rehearsal room as an important, yet often overlooked, site in which creative artists imagine and perform different relationships with their musical and cultural heritage. Focusing on the interplay between two performative modes, which we call realism and re-enactment, we describe how the creative team navigated various dramatic and musical challenges associated with the opera, generating a final production that was ambiguous and multi-layered in its
emotional registers and attitudes towards the past.

After Lives: Considering Disembodied Costume via Medieval Copes and Nick Cave’s Soundsuits
Janet Lee and Jo Merrey

Costuming a body for performance both defines and erases boundaries between performer and audience. Historically distinct and creatively oppositional, medieval copes and the soundsuits of contemporary artist Nick Cave work to transcend the everyday and reimagine the self. As the garment subsumes the wearer, the performer’s ‘translated’ presence engages the audience/viewer. But what of costume divested of performer? What is embodied in performance shifts in a costume’s museum afterlives. Postperformance costumes signal vacancy; an uncanny absence. Displacing the performer allows for the renegotiation between object and viewer. Tracememories of performance linger, reconfigured via the costume’s framing and circumstances of viewing.

Hidden Heritage: Concealment, Reuse, and Affective Performance in Historic Buildings and Digital Heritage
Jane-Héloïse Nancarrow

This article considers material heritage of the Middle Ages and early modern period which was deliberately obscured from public view, exploring this concept in light of concealed objects’ emotional impact and cultural meaning, the status of such objects as part of a ‘performance
of concealment’, and the role that concealment played in the creation of heritage. A series of architectural and smaller-scale digital heritage case studies articulate the complex ways that concealment shaped meaningful heritage narratives, both in the past and today—particularly as concealed material culture was often remediated or reused from other heritage settings.

Myth, Reality and Revelation: The Performance of Divine Power on Dartmoor
David C. Harvey and Joanne Parker

This article explores the nexus between the folk heritage of an unusual archaeological site, an early modern account of ‘ball lightning’, and the literary construction of an affective atmosphere. It examines how a violent storm in October 1638 provided a symbolic reservoir for narrative accounts of both the performance of God’s power and the Devil’s trickery, thereby
providing lessons for civil conduct alongside explanations of some unusual archaeological features. Tracing a biographical life history of how the storm has been remembered at different periods since the event, we chart how various narratives of landscape can unfold over several centuries.

Hearing Early Modern Battles: Soundscape Audio as a Way of Recreating the Past
Dolly MacKinnon

This article provides a model of analysis for examining museum exhibitions that specifically incorporate soundscapes for early modern battle histories: one is a local museum at Radway, England, that commemorated the Civil War Battle of Edgehill (1642), and the other is the National Museum of Scotland’s exhibition ʻBonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites’ that includes the 1745 rising that culminated in the Battle of Culloden (1746). Using film music diegesis, the article analyses the ways in which emotions are generated, performed and produced through soundscapes created for early modern battlefields in museums, demonstrating how gendered representations of the past can be overturned and democratized by soundscapes.

‘Three cheers to the old apple tree!’: Wassailing and the Affective Performance of Heritage
Alicia Marchant

The ancient practice of wassailing to apple trees has had global resurgence in recent years, including in Tasmania where it is performed at the Huon Valley Mid-Winter Fest. First recorded at Fordwich (England) in 1585, wassailing is performed annually on Old Twelfth Night and involves a parading group moving noisily between orchards. Taking the Huon Valley wassail as a focus, I will examine the performative elements of the modern wassail, tracing a genealogy of practice, to ask: what happens when wassailing is transplanted to Tasmania? What sorts of ‘pasts’ are recalled, and what emotional work does the wassail performance do?

Parergon Roundtable
Future/s Medieval: Perspectives from the ANZAMEMS Community
Susan Broomhall, Andrew Lynch, Clare Monagle, Amanda Power, Helen Young, Louise D’Arcens, Lindsay Diggelmann, Chris Jones

This roundtable responds to the wide-ranging discussions within and beyond the ANZAMEMS community at present about the ways in which our field is currently being understood and used by those in the broader community, as well as how these developments may provoke new lines of enquiry within medieval and medievalism scholarship.

Members of our community, scholars of the medieval, were invited to contribute
short papers reflecting on new directions and pressure points for medieval studies.
These encompass considerations within the academy and as the medieval is
understood and employed beyond it, and indeed as these are in dialogue with each other.

Parergon welcomes article submissions on all aspects of medieval and early modern studies. We are especially interested in material that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries and takes new approaches. For more information and submission guidelines, visit the Parergon website.