Tag Archives: medieval

CFP: Leeds International Medieval Congress, 2022, Crusades without Borders

Crusades without Borders

How do we imagine histories of the crusades without borders? How have borders – lived, imagined, invented – influenced and informed scholarship on the crusades since the Middle Ages? What does a history of the crusades without borders look like? This special strand seeks to explore histories and historiographies relevant to the topic of ‘Crusades without Borders’ from the Middle Ages to the present.

The Australasian Crusades Studies Network seeks papers for a strand on ‘Crusades without Borders’ at the Leeds International Medieval Congress 2022. Researchers at all career stages and affiliations are invited to send abstracts for proposed papers on the theme of ‘Crusades without Borders’. We are interested in papers that explore themes such as:

Encounters, entanglements, engagements;
Divisions (historical and historiographical);
Distance and proximity;
Border policing;
Gender;
Race;
Theoretical and methodological issues.

Please submit abstracts of 250 words, including your name, contact email, affiliation to Professor Megan Cassidy-Welch (Megan.Cassidy-Welch@acu.edu.au) by Friday September 17, 2021.

CFP: Resilience, Persistence, and Agency

Resilience, Persistence, and Agency
The American University of Paris, Paris, France
On-site and online
5th – 7th January 2022

Resilience in the face of adversity for marginalized individuals, persistence in the face of obstacles created by hegemonic power structures, and creative or subversive forms of agency were as often exerted by feminine and queer actors in the Middle Ages as they are in the twenty-first century. Contemporary medieval scholarship is inflected by intersectional feminist frameworks that explore how individuals can understand and subvert power structures in the face of multiple oppressions, postcolonial studies that broadens our understanding of what constitutes a “Middle Ages,” and critical race theory that invites medievalists to interrogate the history of their discipline and the pernicious ends to which “medievalism” has been put in contemporary white supremacist discourses.

This edition of the Gender and Medieval Studies Conference invites papers that examine how resilience, persistence, and agency were deployed by actors during the global Middle Ages and how medieval studies can play an activist role in deconstructing the misperceptions of the period that buttress oppressive politics.

The organizers welcome proposals on any aspect of resilience, persistence, and agency as it relates to medieval genders and sexualities from scholars at any stage of study or career. Proposals for papers may include, but are not limited to:

Subversive discourses in the Middle Ages/covert agency/unrecognized resilience/transgressive behaviors/persistence and resistance/anachronism and activism/postcolonial medieval studies/recovering trans and queer narratives/antiracist medieval scholarship/non-European Middle Ages.

We anticipate contributors giving papers of 10-15 minutes. Proposals for panels of 3-4 papers are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for roundtables (90 minutes) of 3-5 participants.

The conference aims to be as inclusive as possible and encourages participation from around the globe. As such the sessions and activities will be a mixture of on-site events in Paris with remote and/or asynchronous participation welcome. The conference will be broadcast via Zoom on Paris time.

Please submit proposed titles and abstracts of 300 words, with a short biography to Elizabeth Kinne (gmsconference2022@gmail.com) by September 15, 2021. See the conference website for further details.

Visit the Gender and Medieval Studies website and find us on Twitter @medievalgender.

CARMEN: The Worldwide Medieval Network – (Virtual) Annual General Meeting 2021

CARMEN: The Worldwide Medieval Network – (Virtual) Annual General Meeting 2021

“The Middle Ages in the Americas”

The annual CARMEN open meeting brings together scholars and professionals from across the world in participatory and interactive formats, including talks by leading scholars, paper sessions, project development workshops, and our annual ‘Forum’ showcasing projects, institutions and research centers. This year’s meeting will take place on 3-5 September 2021, co-sponsored by the Medieval Academy of America and Harvard University’s Committee on Medieval Studies. The theme for this year’s CARMEN meeting, “The Middle Ages in the Americas”, highlights our North American venue, and is meant to encourage scholarly conversation on the rich history of Medieval Studies in the Western hemisphere, as well as the myriad ways in which “the medieval” has been portrayed and appropriated within the art, architecture, literature, and popular culture of the Americas.

Due to the continuing challenges posed by the Covid-19 pandemic, we will not be able to gather in Boston as originally planned. Instead, our meeting will take place virtually, featuring a combination of synchronous lectures, sessions, and workshops that will take place from 1000 to 1500 EDT on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. In addition to keynote talks by Professor Laura Cleaver (School of Advanced Studies, University of London) and Professor Cord Whitaker (Wellesley College) and a series of talks on this year’s theme, the 2021 CARMEN meeting also will feature presentations of new and early-stage project proposals submitted for this year’s CARMEN Project Prize, the winner of which will be announced at the meeting’s conclusion.

For full details about the meeting, including the programme, click here.

“The Middle Ages in the Americas”, the 2021 Annual Meeting of CARMEN, is free and open to the public. To register for the meeting, which will be hosted on the Eventbrite meeting platform from 3 September to 5 September 2021, please click here.

CFP: International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds

International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds: Britain’s Border Geographies

University of Leeds 4-7 July 2022

This series of three panels is sponsored by the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol, and the Medieval and Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney.

The aim of these panels is to explore aspects of identity formation in the multicultural border zones of medieval Britain, including England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, the North Atlantic coast and the English Channel linking Britain to France and the Low Countries. A wide range of critical approaches is encouraged, including, but not limited to, eco-criticism, cultural geography, gender theory, book history, historiography, literary criticism, linguistics, postcolonial theory.

We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers from all disciplines. Proposals from postgraduates and early-career scholars are particularly welcome.

Abstracts of up to 100 words can be sent to: Helen Fulton (helen.fulton@bristol.ac.uk) or Jan Shaw (jan.shaw@sydney.edu.au) by Friday 10 September 2021. Please include your name and full contact details, including institutional address, and any AV equipment you are likely to need.

For more information please see: