Category Archives: conference

ANZAMEMS 2022 Conference CFP – Panel on Aesthetics in Medieval and Early Modern Poetry

We invite scholarly proposals for papers on aesthetics in medieval and early modern poetry (c. 400 to 1800), as part of a panel or panels being established at ANZAMEMS 2022. The link to the main website and call for papers is here: https://www.anzamems2021.com/

The panel(s) will examine the influence of aesthetic styles, movements, rhetorical and aesthetic techniques and theories on the development of poetry, or the work of specified poet(s) at any time during the relevant periods in Europe and Britain. Papers should be set within the broader topic of the overall conference, and deal with questions of reception and/or emotion. Speakers might consider:

· The role of emotions in medieval or early modern aesthetic theories;

· Models of embodiment in aesthetic theories during the period;

· Theories of affect, affectus and/or feelings;

· The impact of theological and biblical sources (for example, by Augustine and Aquinas);

· The impact of philosophy of mind/body, metaphysics and ethics (such as the Platonic and Aristotelian);

· Formal theories of poetics and rhetoric, including the role of style in rhetorical figures and tropes;

· The impact of artistic movements (such as Neoplatonist, Neoclassical, Baroque) and the reciprocal influence of visual arts on poetry (eg ut pictura poiesis);

· Public and private models of ‘taste’, audience and reception;

· The role of pleasure, the imagination and sensuous and vivid imagery;

· Techniques for the aestheticization of the sacred (such as the poetics of enigma);

· Theories of the sublime and the beautiful;

· Participatory versus objectivist aesthetics;

· Materialist, or transcendental and idealist models;

· Poststructural or psychoanalytic approaches; or

· The role and value of historicist and/or modern theory.

We invite submissions for 20 minute presentations, followed by 5 minutes of Q&A. If you are interested in presenting your work, please send any questions, or otherwise the title, a 200 word abstract and a 50 word biography, at the first instance to Dr Jane Vaughan at jane.vaughan@uwa.edu.au

Deadline for Panel Submissions: 12 October 2021

The panel(s) will be held as part of the biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, at the School of Humanities, The University of Western Australia, Perth, 27 June to 1 July, 2022

CFP: Reception, Emotion, and the Crusades, panels at ANZAMEMS Conference, 27 June–1 July 2022

The theme for the 2022 ANZAMEMS (Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies) conference is ‘Reception and Emotion’. Professor Megan Cassidy-Welch (Australian Catholic University) and Dr Beth Spacey (University of Queensland) are inviting proposals for 20-minute papers to be part of a strand of themed panels examining aspects of reception and/or emotion, broadly conceived, in a crusading context. Please send your 200-word abstracts and paper title, along with a short bio (max. 50 words), to Beth (b.spacey@uq.edu.au) by 30 September 2021.

The thirteenth biennial ANZAMEMS Conference will be held on 27 June to 1 July 2022 in Perth at the University of Western Australia. More information, including details regarding travel bursaries, is available here.

Eleonora di Toledo at 500, Call for Papers

CFP RSA Dublin Wednesday March 30- Saturday April 2 2022!

Eleonora di Toledo at 500

2022 marks the five hundredth anniversary of the presumed birth of Eleonora di Toledo. The past thirty years have witnessed the publication of numerous studies that have fundamentally changed our image of the duchess of Florence from a passive object of her husband’s will to an active collaborator in the construction of an autocratic state. These panels seek new contributions about Eleonora di Toledo from all disciplines. Some themes that might be explored are “The Literary Eleonora;” “The Posthumous Eleonora;” “Eleonora in the 1550s.” Comparative approaches to the political and economic activities and the artistic, literary, musical, and religious patronage of other contemporary ruling women are especially welcome.

Proposals should be sent by August 2 to Bruce Edelstein at edelstein@nyu.edu or Natalie Tomas at natalie.tomas@monash.edu. Please include a title (15 words max), an abstract (150 words max), and a short CV (300 words max).

Classical Reformations: Beyond Christian Humanism, Online conference hosted by the Warburg Institute, 2-3 Sep. 2021

Convenors: Dr Micha Lazarus and Dr Lucy Nicholas (Warburg Institute)

Christian humanism has dominated the story of classical reception in Reformation Europe, as the first Erasmian generation of reformers retooled classical texts to Christian ends. Yet the utility of the classical tradition to later generations of reformers has been largely overlooked by modern scholarship. We propose that as the Reformation evolved, the influence of classical learning was as likely to flow in the other direction: that the literature and ideas of the ancient world had a formative influence on Christian politics and theology. Major Reformation figures—from Melanchthon, Sturm, Ascham, and Beza, to many of their Catholic opponents, such as Pole and Bellarmine—were scholars by day, as comfortable with Catullus as Corinthians. Their classical learning actively empowered and shaped the formulation of Christian faith during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Classical Reformations: Beyond Christian Humanism explores how the literature and ideas of the classical world calibrated early modern Christianity—its interpretation, ordinances, moral instruction, politics, theology, cultural expression, and polarizing impulses of confessionalisation. How did classical learning fill the gaps in the Lutheran rejection of Catholic doctrine? How did classical poetry and drama shape the Roman Church’s popular outreach after the Council of Trent? How did classical history and rhetoric inflect the turbulent politics of the Reformation? Looking beyond the Christian absorption of pagan material and Erasmian humanism redux, this conference focuses instead on a classical Christianity, even a Greco-Roman monotheism, in the generations after Erasmus. Where recent scholarship has replaced confessionalism at the heart of early modern philology, we aim to replace classicism at the heart of theology and religious politics. The classical tradition was too ubiquitous and authoritative a presence in early modern intellectual life to have left theology untouched.

This international conference will take place online over two days, hosted by the Warburg Institute. Speakers include leading and upcoming scholars from Belgium, Canada, Croatia, Denmark, France, Hong Kong, Italy, Spain, the United States, and the United Kingdom, and a keynote address will be given by Prof. Ralph Keen (University of Illinois at Chicago).

The event is free via Zoom with advance registration. For further information please see the website.

Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand 2021 Conference: Call for papers

The Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand 2021 Conference will be hosted online from Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland on 22-23 November 2021.

The conference theme is Communities, books and the power of words.

We invite papers that explore the intersections and dynamics between communities, books and power. These could include reflections on texts and their uses to inspire, transform or suppress communities, or the ways in which people have resisted or subverted systems of power in and through bibliographic-related domains or means. Papers could look to the past or the future or contribute to current discussions generated by international movements examining power, including in heritage, cultural and academic institutions.

To find out more about BSANZ, the 2021 conference and the call for papers, which closes on 21 June, go to: bsanz.org

AEMA Conference CFP on Eruption/Disruption/Interruption!


Conference October 1-2, 2021!

The conference committee invites papers on the theme of Eruption/Disruption/Interruption. As we continue to process the impact of COVID-19 on global and local societies, the jury is still out on whether the eruption of a global pandemic, and the subsequent disruptions and interruptions to contemporary routines, are a ‘game-changer’ or an inconvenience.

At the heart of our theme is the concept of a rupture. This can refer to something that has broken, burst, or been destroyed. It can imply that either outside forces are too great for the structure in question and have destroyed it functionally, or that something within that which has ruptured was too volatile or incompatible to remain contained, controlled, or unified. Over the past 18 months, we have been witness to both of these types of rupture, as outside forces have challenged the very foundations of our society, while at the same time, internal tensions have broken forth and resulted in historic movements for democracy, equality, environmental awareness, and corporate accountability and transparency.

Global society is at a turning point of multiple ruptured points, and the 2021 AEMA conference aims to reflect on this tension in an early medieval context.

· Eruptions can be understood in many different ways, as they can describe both natural phenomena and human activity, including the sudden appearance of new movements, of groups of people, or of ideas.

· Were eruptions revolutionary? Or were they merely a disruption to the longue durée?

· Does hindsight make it easier to identify ruptures as epoch-altering events and ideas? Or does the passage of time, and attendant loss of witnesses, memories, and evidence muddy the waters too much?

· Why and in what ways did eruptions change things? And why and in what ways did they merely disrupt.

· When and how does an interruption become a disruption?

· What did the idea of a ‘new normal’ mean in the early medieval world? How quickly do societies adapt to internal and external pressures?

· And when societies change as a result of these pressures, are they still the same society?

This conference calls for papers that relate to this theme. Or, in the spirit of the theme, those that do not.

In 2021, AEMA intends to hold a hybrid conference, with both a physical location (or locations) as well as an online option. At this stage, the main physical location is likely to be in Victoria, with the potential for additional ‘hubs’ to be held in other Australian and/or International locations, depending on interest and availability.

Submissions may be in the form of individual papers of 20 minutes duration, themed panels of three 20-minute papers, or Round Tables of up to six shorter papers (total of one hour).

All sessions will include time for questions and general discussion. Please send proposals (150–200 words per paper), along with author’s name, paper/panel/RT title, and academic affiliation (if any) to conference@aema.net.au by 31 July 2021. Please also direct all other enquiries about the conference to this address, as well as any nominations for potentially hosting an in-person hub.

ANZAMEMS Conference Postponed Until Mid-2022

We have been closely monitoring the situation in relation to coronavirus (COVID-19) and its potential impact upon the ‘Reception and Emotion’ conference.

Based on current Australian Government advice, we have decided to postpone the conference until mid-2022. The new conference dates are 27 June to 1 July 2022!

We are mindful of uncertainty prompted by the outbreak and cannot predict what impact it will have in the coming weeks and months.

Our primary concern is the health and safety of all involved in the conference, and we are aware of the need to ensure the conference is as safe an environment as possible for all.

Our Call for Papers and applications for Prizes and Travel Bursaries remain open and now close on Friday 12 November 2021. We look forward to seeing you in Perth in 2022! Updates about the conference will be posted on the conference website as details are confirmed.

The Past, Present, and Future of Digital Medieval Studies: A Global Digital Medievalist Symposium, 24 May, 11 June, and 21 June, 2021

The era of COVID-19 has been transformational for medieval digital humanities. Medievalists have come to learn the limits and possibilities of online scholarship, whether in the virtual classroom or in the transfer of knowledge among specialists. Although direct access to material sources and the easy face-to-face exchanges with colleagues are deeply missed, we have come to understand that digitally-inflected scholarship can be more economical, more global, and –in limited ways– more equitable for many medievalists. And because we have come to this inflection point, members of the Digital Medievalist Board are launching a conference series that marks this turn and aims to build upon what we have learned. Our theme, The Past, Present and Future of Medieval Digital Studies is both retrospective and prospective in scope, bringing digital medievalist practitioners into conversation with each other as we step into a new scholarly environment where digital methods take on a new importance.

Our new global awareness has inspired us to plan three conference dates, each of which is aligned with a geographic space and accommodates scholars from three time zones grouped as The Americas, Asia & Oceania, and Europe & Africa. The Americas conversation will take place on Monday, 24 May 2021, Asia & Oceania on Friday, June 11, and Europe & Africa on Monday, June 21.

For more information and to register link to the Digital Medievalist symposium website.

Excited by all the work going on in the DM world and want to get more involved? Think about nominating yourself or someone else to serve on the DM Executive Board! Nominations and self-nominations accepted until Wednesday, 26 May. For more information, please visit the 2021-2023 DM Board Elections website.


FISIER Séminaire Virtuel & Cotisation 2021 | Virtual Seminar & Membership 2021

Starting in June 2021, FISIER will organize a virtual seminar on the new ways of Renaissance studies (ReNov / ReNeW : Renaissance : Nouvelles Voies / Renaissance New Ways): digital humanities, cultural transfer and translation, historical continuities, women studies, new tools and new perspective on material culture, transmission and vulgarisation, cultural dominations, etc. Please, find a detailed description of the seminar’s scopes in the attached document. The seminar will unfold as a series of thematic panels to be held on a bi- or tri-monthly basis. Each session will include two presentations from leading scholars in the field, followed by responses coordinated by the member societies of FISIER. These events will be held in English and/or French, with translations and bilingual abstracts; recordings of the sessions will be made available online, pending the guests’ approval. The program of the seminar will be made available as soon as the sessions are planned; information will also be posted on the FISIER’s website.

The first session will be held on June 28, 202. Time: 9am-12pm (New York) / 3-6pm (Paris) / 10pm-1am (Tokyo) / 11pm-2am (Sydney).

This session will focus Digital Humanities with presentations by:

Anthony Grafton (Princeton University)
Digital Editions of Marginalia : Practices, Problems and Prospects

Marie-Luce Demonet (CESR, Tours)
Dérives et récidives : distance salutaire et approche cognitive

It will include responses by

Simone Albonico, Université de Lausanne, Ann Blair, Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor, Harvard University, and Eric M. Johnson, Director of Digital Access, Folger Shakespeare Library.

The sessions are organized collegially by several institutions and member societies of FISIER. The inaugural sessions will exceptionally be open to all participants interested, even those who are not members of FISIER (there might be some limits to our capacity due to technical reasons).

Given that our research interests are partly similar to yours, we would be delighted to have you among our members, and we thank you in advance for your support. May we share our 2021 membership form. It should be sent to our treasurer, Christine de Buzon.

CFP AskHistorians Digital Conference

2021 ASKHISTORIANS DIGITAL CONFERENCE: “[DELETED] & MISSING HISTORY: RECONSTRUCTING THE PAST, CONFRONTING DISTORTIONS”
19–21 October 2021
AskHistorians Public History Forum

Whether it’s swords and sandals, corsets and wigs, or statues still standing, the past and its possible meanings resonate with twenty-first century audiences. Historical television series, public history projects, and books of popular history might claim to depict the past “as it really was,” but nevertheless illuminate the ways in which we as a society continue to bring the past into dialogue with contemporary popular culture. In so doing, these narratives often reveal more about what we think about the past—and ourselves—than about the past itself. Today, shifting interpretations of the past reveal a growing interest in the inclusion of marginalized voices as well as in questions about the human condition, the relationship between race and national identity, and issues relating to the
construction of sexuality, gender, and equality. Indeed, representations of the historical past have been used as lenses through which contemporary society has grappled with very modern examples of brutality, oppression, and the general uncertainty of life.

We therefore welcome proposals from individuals whose research explores representations of the past in any form. As the scope and influence of our topic is broad and far-reaching, we encourage proposals from a wide range of scholarly disciplines on the themes of gender, identity (both personal and national), propaganda, culture, society, accuracy, and authenticity (among others) as these pertain to the ways in which historical narratives have been constructed, represented, or misrepresented.

Applicants are asked to please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words and a short biography of no more than 100 words to conference@askhistorians.com by 11:59 PM EDT on 1 June 2021.

For more information, including suggested topics and a guide for submissions, see the attached document.