Category Archives: conference

2022 ANZAMEMS Conference Registration!

This is just a reminder that registration for the 2022 ANZAMEMS Conference on Reception and Emotion is open! Registration will close on 24 June.

To register, please visit our conference website and click the big red ‘Register for the Conference’ button!

Please note, if you’re an ANZAMEMS member for 2022, you’re entitled to pay the discounted ANZAMEMS members’ rate. If you haven’t paid your 2022 membership fees, you can do so online here. If you’re unsure if you’ve paid for 2022, please contact us at info@anzamems.org.

Update regarding the 2022 ANZAMEMS Conference – to be held ONLINE ONLY

In light of the continued border closures in Western Australia, the 2022 ANZAMEMS conference committee has decided that the upcoming conference will now be held solely online.

The conference committee thanks all those who have submitted their proposals for the conference. The conference programming sub-committee is busily reviewing all the fantastic proposals for papers, panels and roundtables that we have received. We are still accepting late proposals until Friday 18 February (5:00pm AWST), so if you haven’t yet submitted a proposal, then now’s your chance!

In line with the updates to the ANZAMEMS conference, we are also extending the deadline for applications for the George Yule Prize, as well as applications for the travel bursaries and the carer bursaries. These bursaries will be awarded to those who need to travel in order to access the conference online, and to provide carers with support for the duration of the conference.

The new deadline for applications for the George Yule Prize and the travel and carer bursaries is now Monday 11 April (9:00am AWST).

Should you have any questions about the conference, please email the conference committee at anzamems2021@gmail.com

CFP: Going Places, Mobility, Migration, Exile, Space and Emotions

Third Biennial Conference for the Society for the History of Emotions
Florence, 30 August – 2 September 2022

The Third Biennial Conference of the Society for the History of Emotions (SHE) will focus on mobility, migration, exile, traversing of space, and emotions. The current, at times heated debates about migration in Europe, Australia, North America and elsewhere necessitate a profound and critical historical contextualisation, especially from a history-of-emotions point of view. Hope, fear, hatred, empathy, all manner of feelings shape peoples’ movements around the globe and the ways in which newcomers are heartily welcomed, coldly brushed off or fiercely attacked. Using archival, literary and other sources, this conference will explore the emotions that motivate people to go elsewhere, and the emotional responses of displaced peoples and the communities they orbit and join.

We call for papers and panels investigating case studies that concern the movement of people and their feelings about places and other people, from homesickness to wanderlust, from belonging to estrangement. We also want to discuss the political, economical and emotional conditions that instigate transnational movements and inform how men and women cope with and react to these mobilities.

We’ll engage with how people who have been socialised in different emotional communities learn to read each other’s emotional gestures and utterances; and will examine the affective entanglement between diasporic communities, their homelands and host communities. In short, we aim to bring research on migration and mobility to bear on the historical study of emotions, and vice versa.

We shall accept papers and panels on the following topics, as well as other potentially relevant topics not listed below:
• explorers, travellers and tourists
• dynamics of emigration, immigration and remigration
• itinerant workers
• slavery and indentured labour
• movements of colonising and colonised subjects
• feelings of inclusion and exclusion, of longing and alienation
• letters and other means by which people maintain affective bonds across countries
• migratory experiences of racism and emotional coping strategies
• emotional practices and narratives of welcome or rejection
• memory, memoires, writing practices related to experiences of migration, displacement, exile
• literary and other accounts of emotional practices linked to separation, return, nostalgia, melancholy, etc.
Chronologically, papers can delve into the ancient, the medieval and early modern, or the modern period. In geographical terms we welcome contributions on local, regional or global mobilities in areas across the world. Transdisciplinary contributions are welcome.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Proposals should consist of a title, abstract of up to 300 words and a short bio, to be sent via email as a pdf attachment to SHEFlorence22@gmail.com by 1 March 2022. We also accept proposals for panels of three papers, which should include all of the above for each presenter, a panel title and abstract for the panel itself and, if possible, the name and short bio of the panel chair.


Participants will be notified by late March 2022.

ANZAMEMS 2022 Conference Expressions of Interest

Our 2022 hybrid conference on Reception and Emotion is getting closer! We are excited to see you all there soon – both in person and online!

This is just a reminder to please fill out this expression of interest form by 10 December 2021 if you are interested in attending! It gives us an idea of conference numbers and a few other bits of information: https://forms.gle/NWC3KJcuJXBDhA2W7.

For further details on the conference CFP, bursaries, and other exciting information please see the website: https://www.anzamems2021.com.

CFP – Connecting bodies at/of work in Oceania #1: Sustaining remote research in Covid-times.

Round table at the ANZAMEMS Conference, Perth 27-30 June 2022 (and online).

For many medievalists and early modernists, the pandemic disrupted access to primary research sources, but can we build more environmentally and socially sustainable academic practices out of this apparent loss?

This call is for a 10-minute reflection on your remote and/or collaborative research practices connecting you to existing or new research corpora during our long confinement. Reflections on failed attempts to connect are also welcome at this exploratory academic practice round table.

The hope is that through collaboration and discussion we can build shared practices that connect researchers with each other and to corpora (bodies at/of work), to improve the diversity, and the social and environmental sustainability of early modern research.

With thanks, Julie Robarts, PhD (Centre for Early Modern Studies, ANU)

Twitter: @julie_robarts

By December 20, please email your name, paper title, 150 word abstract, and link to a bio to julie.robarts@anu.edu.au.

Call for Papers: 2022 ANZAMEMs Ceræ panel

The Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies is hosting a hybrid online and at the University of Western Australia for it’s 13th biennial conference, with the topic “Reception and Emotion”. Ceræ is accepting submissions for a panel with the following themes.

Themes: Reception, Emotion, and Witchcraft

As Michael Ostling and Laura Kounine have pointed out, the history of witchcraft has always also been a history of emotions: the victims, the accusers, and the witches themselves. It demonstrates the importance of perspective: whose emotions are we permitted to see, from whose standpoint? What role do emotions play in creating the idea of witchcraft, and how do these differ over time and space? The intersection of the history of emotions and the history of witchcraft also highlight the importance of reception (both premodern and present-day) and concerns regarding methodology (in both fields). It also invites scholars to critically consider the additional intersection of rationality, as this is often contrasted with both emotions and witchcraft – often to the detriment of the latter. Does this help us to uncover particularly elusive aspects of premodern witchcraft, or reinforce negative stereotypes? Ceræ invites submissions for papers to discuss these themes.

Paper proposals may include but are not limited to
•To what extent are emotions and a lack of reason which informs them one of the only ways which we try to understand the irrational within a system of dogmatic beliefs?
•Differences in the intersection of emotions and witchcraft between the medieval and early modern periods.
•Regional differences in associations and intersections between emotions and witchcraft.
•The vulnerability of marginalised communities to these associations and intersections.
•Emotions that are brought into particularly close association with witchcraft; conversely, those which are not, and what impact this can have for our understanding of premodern witchcraft.
•The additional intersection of emotion, witchcraft, and religion.

Please send abstracts of not more than 250 words to editorcerae@gmail.com by December 31st.

For further information on the ANZAMEMS conference, visit https://www.anzamems2021.com/

ANZAMEMS 2022 Conference: Reception and Emotion Update!

We are pleased to announce that ANZAMEMS’ upcoming 2022 conference will now be a hybrid conference, with both online and in-person presentation and attendance catered for. The conference will be held from 27–30 June 2022!

Because of this, we have decided to extend the CFP and the new closing date for applications will be 10 January 2022! Applications for Bursaries & Prizes are open, and the closing date for them has also been extended to 10 January 2022.

Keep an eye out for some exciting upcoming details, including a conference dinner, in person excursions, and panels and exhibitions for both online and in person attendees!

For more details, including the Call for Papers, details of the ANZAMEMS Seminar, and all Prizes and Travel Bursaries on offer, please visit the conference website: https://www.anzamems2021.com

CFP – Royal Bodies panel

This panel will convene at the Thirteenth Biennial Conference of the Australia and New Zealand Association of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (#anza22), to be held in-person at The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, and online via Zoom, from 27-30 June 2022.

The idea of the ‘king’s two bodies’, a duality predicated on the idea that a monarch possessed two bodies, a natural body and a body politic – the former mortal, the latter an embodiment of both the nation and the authority of sovereignty – has long been of interest to scholars of medieval and early modern monarchies.

The body of a monarch remains a contest site, with the life, health, fertility, and sexuality of kings or queens continuing to be an important part of politics. Royal scandal graces the covers of newspapers and magazines and trends on social media, and royal weddings, births, and deaths continue to capture the public’s imagination and interest.

We seek papers that examine the significance of the royal body, in particular, the reception of the royal body across time periods, cultures, and media and how royal bodies both convey and elicit emotions.

Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:

  1. A title
  2. An abstract (max. 200 words)
  3. A short biography (max. 50 words)

Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) to mgerzic@gmail.com by Monday 13 December 2021.

Please see the call for papers for further information:

CFP – PANEL ON EMOTIONS AND HEALTH IN SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA AND RELATED FIELDS

ANZAMEMS 2022 CONFERENCE ON RECEPTION AND EMOTION
CFP – PANEL ON EMOTIONS AND HEALTH IN SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA AND RELATED FIELDS


We invite scholarly proposals for papers on emotions and health in Shakespearean drama and related fields, as part of a panel or panels being established at ANZAMEMS 2022. The link to the main website and call for papers is here: https://www.anzamems2021.com/

The panel(s) will examine the topics of health, wellbeing, and emotions in Shakespearean drama and related fields and/or its reception today. In particular we welcome papers broadly relating to the discipline of health humanities. Papers should be set within the broader topic of the overall conference, and deal with questions of reception and/or emotion.

Papers might consider but are not limited to:
· The role of emotions in early modern health and drama and literature
· Well-being and emotional health in early modern drama and literature
· Illness and its expression in early modern drama and literature
· Ideas of emotional resilience and their reception today
· Social and cultural concepts of health in early modern drama and the modern inheritances
· Social and cultural constructs of well-being and illness in early modern drama and/or their modern inheritances
· Metaphors of health, well-being, and illness in early modern drama and/or their reception today
· The relationship between human health and the environment/ecology
· The body, ideas relating to the body, the performative body, and embodiment in Shakespeare and related fields
· Inheritances of those ideas of the body, the performative body, and embodiment in Shakespeare and related fields

We invite submissions for 15 minute presentations, which will be followed by 30 minutes of Q&A on the themes raised by all speakers on the panel. If you are interested in presenting your work, please send any questions, or otherwise the title, a 200 word abstract and a 50 word biography to Dr Bríd Phillips at brid.phillips@uwa.edu.au and Dr Claire Hansen at claire.hansen3@jcu.edu.au.

Deadline for Panel Submissions: 8 November 2021

The panel(s) will be held as part of the biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, at the The University of Western Australia, Perth, 27 June to 1 July, 202

CFP Macbeth in European Culture

Macbeth in European Culture, International Symposium
University of Murcia (Spain)
22-24th March, 2022

Despite its Scottish-Anglo setting and its close relationship to the politics of the Stuart regency, Macbeth has proven one of Shakespeare’s most suggestive plays for practitioners and artists working far beyond its original Anglophone context. The play’s potential for violence, its exploration of hierarchy and power, its conflicting gender dynamics and its supernatural dimensions are just some of the elements that have been appropriated on stages around Europe. They have also prompted the transformation of the play into different shapes, formats and media, and so this symposium intends to inspect the multiple afterlives of Macbeth beyond its initial historical and cultural resonances. We are looking for innovative work that approaches the play from regional, national, continental and intercontinental angles as we try to chart Macbeth’s reception in or in relation to Europe from the seventeenth century to the present. Among other possibilities, we invite discussions concerning the relocation of the play’s ideological, gender/sexuality, regional/ethnic/racial/religious boundaries within specific historical and theoretical contexts. Contributions on any of the following are welcome:

— Macbeth in European theatrical, operatic, cinematic, televisual or online performance;
— Different European versions (adaptations, rewritings, appropriations, updates) of Macbeth;
— Translations of Macbeth into non-Anglophone European languages: the importance and impact of those translations in their target cultures and in intercultural contexts;
— Reception of Anglophone Macbeth in non-Anglophone contexts, or the reception of non-Anglophone Macbeth in Anglophone contexts;
— Traveling Macbeth: international tours of the play, intercultural performances of the play;
— Macbeth in European visual cultures: from illustration to audiovisual art;
— Macbeth in European digital cultures;
— Theoretical reflections on Macbeth as a case study of ‘European Shakespeare’ and or versus ‘global Shakespeare’.

We particularly favor contributions which relate interventions (artistic or otherwise) to broader regional, national, transnational, continental or intercontintental concerns and to the history of Shakespeare’s reception in these contexts. A 250-300 word abstract and a brief bio should be sent to Juan F. Cerdá (juanfcerda@um.es) and Paul Prescott (pprescott@ucmerced.edu) by December 3rd, 2021.

The symposium will be held at the La Merced Campus of the University of Murcia (Spain), yet online participation will be available for those facing traveling restrictions.