Tag Archives: Early Modern History

ANZAMEMS DEVELOPMENT SCHEME (ADS) 2021

Dear ANZAMEMS ECRs and HDR Students,

I’m writing to provide an update on the ANZAMEMS DEVELOPMENT SCHEME (ADS), our forthcoming workshop series for HDR students and ECRs. Since our last communication with the ANZAMEMS membership, we have finalised the seminar schedule and topics (see below). We have 27 members enrolled in the workshops, and we are very much looking forward to meeting them. For any HDRs and ECRs who missed the first call, we invite them to apply to join the scheme.

Should you wish to apply to join this seminar series, please email Clare Monagle clare.monagle@mq.edu.au by October 24th to register your interest, supplying the information below. Participation is only open to ANZAMEMS members.

1. Name
2. Brief Bio (100 Words)
3. Reason for Interest (100 Words)

Many thanks,
The ADS organising committee (Matthew Champion, Nat Cutter, Clare Monagle, Megan Shaw)

Session Topics and Schedule
(All times given in Australian Eastern Standard Time)

Session 1
ECR Careers in Australia
Convener – Clare Monagle
October 28th, 3-5pm

Session 2
ECR Careers in North America
Convener – Clare Monagle
November 5th, 9-11am

Session 3
ECR Careers in Europe and the United Kingdom
Convener – Clare Monagle
November 9th, 12-2pm

Session 4
Methodology 1 – Planning Interdisciplinary Projects
Conveners – Nat Cutter and Megan Shaw
November 18th, 3-5pm

Session 5
Methodology 2 – Research from Afar
Conveners – Nat Cutter and Megan Shaw
November 24th, 9-11am


Session 6
Critical Issues in Medieval and Early Modern Studies – Globality
Conveners – Matthew Champion and Helen Young
December 1st, 9-11am

Session 7
Critical Issues in Medieval and Early Modern Studies – Materiality
Conveners – Matthew Champion and Helen Young
December 9th, 1-3pm

Call for contributions: Daphnis, German culture of the early modern period

Coffee and Tobacco – ignitors of sociability?

The last Daphnis issue focuses on the sociability discourse in early modern Leipzig. This includes social practices like singing student and drinking songs like the ‘Dunkelmännerlied’ or eating goose at Martin’s Eve. This issue clearly makes an important contribution to the cultural history of the early modern period and is hence worth reading.

For further information please see: Formen der Geselligkeit und ihr historischer Wandel als Herausforderung der frühneuzeitlichen Kulturgeschichte.

Eleonora di Toledo at 500, Call for Papers

CFP RSA Dublin Wednesday March 30- Saturday April 2 2022!

Eleonora di Toledo at 500

2022 marks the five hundredth anniversary of the presumed birth of Eleonora di Toledo. The past thirty years have witnessed the publication of numerous studies that have fundamentally changed our image of the duchess of Florence from a passive object of her husband’s will to an active collaborator in the construction of an autocratic state. These panels seek new contributions about Eleonora di Toledo from all disciplines. Some themes that might be explored are “The Literary Eleonora;” “The Posthumous Eleonora;” “Eleonora in the 1550s.” Comparative approaches to the political and economic activities and the artistic, literary, musical, and religious patronage of other contemporary ruling women are especially welcome.

Proposals should be sent by August 2 to Bruce Edelstein at edelstein@nyu.edu or Natalie Tomas at natalie.tomas@monash.edu. Please include a title (15 words max), an abstract (150 words max), and a short CV (300 words max).

Centre for Early Modern Studies ANU Inaugural Seminar

What is Early Modern History?

Please join us in person or through the Zoom platform for our Inaugural Seminar on Tuesday July 13, when Professor Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks will talk about her latest book, What Is Early Modern History?, which was published in March in the Polity ‘What Is History?’ series.

The work offers a concise guide to historical research from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, within and beyond Europe, including subfields and approaches to the period. She will discuss how she conceptualized and wrote it, and the ways this changed while writing during the COVID pandemic. The seminar will be followed by a Q&A and discussion.

See the following flier for further information: