Tag Archives: medieval and renaissance studies

CFP: Leeds International Medieval Congress, 2022, Crusades without Borders

Crusades without Borders

How do we imagine histories of the crusades without borders? How have borders – lived, imagined, invented – influenced and informed scholarship on the crusades since the Middle Ages? What does a history of the crusades without borders look like? This special strand seeks to explore histories and historiographies relevant to the topic of ‘Crusades without Borders’ from the Middle Ages to the present.

The Australasian Crusades Studies Network seeks papers for a strand on ‘Crusades without Borders’ at the Leeds International Medieval Congress 2022. Researchers at all career stages and affiliations are invited to send abstracts for proposed papers on the theme of ‘Crusades without Borders’. We are interested in papers that explore themes such as:

Encounters, entanglements, engagements;
Divisions (historical and historiographical);
Distance and proximity;
Border policing;
Gender;
Race;
Theoretical and methodological issues.

Please submit abstracts of 250 words, including your name, contact email, affiliation to Professor Megan Cassidy-Welch (Megan.Cassidy-Welch@acu.edu.au) by Friday September 17, 2021.

CFP: Resilience, Persistence, and Agency

Resilience, Persistence, and Agency
The American University of Paris, Paris, France
On-site and online
5th – 7th January 2022

Resilience in the face of adversity for marginalized individuals, persistence in the face of obstacles created by hegemonic power structures, and creative or subversive forms of agency were as often exerted by feminine and queer actors in the Middle Ages as they are in the twenty-first century. Contemporary medieval scholarship is inflected by intersectional feminist frameworks that explore how individuals can understand and subvert power structures in the face of multiple oppressions, postcolonial studies that broadens our understanding of what constitutes a “Middle Ages,” and critical race theory that invites medievalists to interrogate the history of their discipline and the pernicious ends to which “medievalism” has been put in contemporary white supremacist discourses.

This edition of the Gender and Medieval Studies Conference invites papers that examine how resilience, persistence, and agency were deployed by actors during the global Middle Ages and how medieval studies can play an activist role in deconstructing the misperceptions of the period that buttress oppressive politics.

The organizers welcome proposals on any aspect of resilience, persistence, and agency as it relates to medieval genders and sexualities from scholars at any stage of study or career. Proposals for papers may include, but are not limited to:

Subversive discourses in the Middle Ages/covert agency/unrecognized resilience/transgressive behaviors/persistence and resistance/anachronism and activism/postcolonial medieval studies/recovering trans and queer narratives/antiracist medieval scholarship/non-European Middle Ages.

We anticipate contributors giving papers of 10-15 minutes. Proposals for panels of 3-4 papers are also warmly welcomed, as are proposals for roundtables (90 minutes) of 3-5 participants.

The conference aims to be as inclusive as possible and encourages participation from around the globe. As such the sessions and activities will be a mixture of on-site events in Paris with remote and/or asynchronous participation welcome. The conference will be broadcast via Zoom on Paris time.

Please submit proposed titles and abstracts of 300 words, with a short biography to Elizabeth Kinne (gmsconference2022@gmail.com) by September 15, 2021. See the conference website for further details.

Visit the Gender and Medieval Studies website and find us on Twitter @medievalgender.

PhD and MPhil Applications: Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the Australian Catholic University

The Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) Program of the Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry (IRCI) welcomes applications from highly motivated students to study toward a Master of Philosophy (MPhil) or Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). We seek applicants who wish to develop research projects in medieval and early modern history in areas such as social, cultural, religious, and gender history.

We are particularly interested in hearing from prospective PhD students interested in developing projects aligned with our large-scale collaborative project, ‘Religious Mobilities: Medieval and Early Modern Europe and the World’. Multiple research scholarships are available to support PhD students in this project.

The IRCI’s MEMS program is the largest medieval and modern program in Australia, and a dynamic, supportive, internationally-engaged research community. Students are supported by reading groups, seminars, professional development opportunities, events across ACU’s cognate faculties and institutes, and international networking opportunities.

For further information, please contact the MEMS Program Director, Professor Megan Cassidy-Welch.

History on Wednesday Seminar series, University of Sydney

“Serendipitous findings: about the unexpected appearance of a daughter of King Arthur in a thirteenth-century piece of Spanish hagiography”

25 August | Hélène Sirantoine

12:10-1:30pm

Scholars finding themselves reading the late thirteenth-century Life of the Blessed Leander and Isidore, archbishops of Seville, Fulgentius, archbishop of Écija, and Braulio, bishop of Zaragoza might be surprised, as was the presenter of this talk, to find in it a puzzling detail. Among the eccentric kinship relations with which the author filled their text, a Visigothic queen, wife of King Reccared (586–601) and mother of King Liuva II (601–603), was made into no less than the “daughter of King Arthur”. But who was really Reccared’s spouse? And how come that, centuries later, some hagiographer imagined making her the offspring of famous, and legendary, King Arthur? Answering these questions led this bemused investigator to examine a wide range of materials, spanning from the sixth to the eighteenth century. This paper traces the steps of this investigation, the longue durée of this medieval legend, and reflects on the role played by serendipitous findings in the making of history.

Hélène Sirantoine is a senior lecturer in history at the University of Sydney. She researches Iberian medieval history with a focus on written culture, especially historiography, hagiography and pragmatic texts as tools of communication and memorialisation. Sirantoine is the author of Imperator Hispaniae: les idéologies impériales dans le royaume de León, IXe-XIIe siècles (Madrid, 2012) and she co-edited with Julio Escalona Chartes et cartulaires comme instruments de pouvoir: Péninsule Ibérique et Occident chrétien, VIIIe-XIIe siècles (Toulouse, 2013) and the two first volumes of the series Epistola (Madrid, 2018) dedicated to epistolary practices in medieval Iberia.

You will be able to Join Zoom from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android
Password: History1

For further information on this talk and further talks in this series, please see the website.

Region and Enmity, A RaceB4Race Symposium

Region and Enmity, A RaceB4Race Symposium

October 19-22, 2021

Co-sponsored by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, the Folger Institute at the Folger Shakespeare Library, and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Arizona State University.

Enmity is a sustaining force for systemic racism, a fervent antipathy toward a category of people. Enmity exists at the nexus of individual and group identity and produces difference by desiring opposition and supremacy, imagining separation by force, and willing conflict. Enmity unfolds in different ways in different places, according to local logics of territory, population, language, or culture, even as these geographical divisions are subject to constant change.

This interdisciplinary symposium, hosted by Rutgers University, focuses on how early modern racial discourses are tied to cartographical markers and ambitions. The notions of enmity and region provide a dual dynamic lens for tracing the racial repertoires that developed in response to increasingly hostile contention between early modern cultural and political forces. The symposium will invite scholars to take up this intersection between region and enmity, and to examine how belief in difference, or the emergence of polarizing structures and violent practices, configured race thinking and racial practices in ways that are both unique to different territories and that transcend them.

RaceB4Race is brought to life by the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in partnership with The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Division of Humanities at Arizona State University. RaceB4Race is underwritten by the Hitz Foundation.

Learn more about RaceB4Race here.

This RaceB4Race symposium will be held virtually. Registration opens August 16, 2021 at 9:00 am EDT.