Category Archives: lecture

Public lecture: From Melancholy to Euphoria and More: Visual Representation of Emotions in Persian Illustrated Manuscripts

The Grimwade Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation presents a free Lecture by Dr Stefano Carboni, director of the Art Gallery of Western Australia:

From Melancholy to Euphoria and More: Visual Representation of Emotions in Persian Illustrated Manuscripts

6pm-7pm Wednesday 27 June at the University of Melbourne

The common perception about Persian miniature painting – better described as book illustration because almost invariably it has a textual, literary or oral context – is that it is elegant, colourful, rather formal in composition, and overall restrained in the way the characters are emotionally involved in a particular moment of the story. Persian illustrators, however, had a clear set of tools and visual tropes to convey feelings such as surprise, love, grief, fear, heroism in the face of death, and many more. Many of the stories told in poetic works by Firdausi, Jami and Nizami, all of which were often illustrated, are heavily charged with impossible love, death-defying trials, heroic quests, and mystic ardour: the written language, often memorized by the reader, is the protagonist while the visual image provides in some way an oasis, a respite for the eye, breaking away from the incessant emotional narrative of the verses. A great chapter for the visual representation of emotions, however, was written during the Ilkhanid (Mongol) period in Iran in the 14th century, a time during which all pictorial rules – if they previously existed – were subverted and we can witness a full range of demonstrative engagement with the viewer.

This lecture is part of the From Melancholy to Euphoria: The Materialisation of Emotion in Middle Eastern Manuscripts Symposium, made possible by support from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions and the Crescent Foundation. Full symposium details at: http://go.unimelb.edu.au/2ct6

Free lecture. All welcome. Bookings essential. For full details and registration: http://go.unimelb.edu.au/6p56

MEMC Lunchtime Talk, University of Sydney

Dr John Gagné (Department of History, University of Sydney), will give a lunchtime talk for the Medieval and Early Modern Centre on 12 April.

John is freshly back from a visiting Fellowship at the Villa I Tatti (The Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies) in Florence. He will talk on:

“Dinner with the Greatest Man on Earth, or, Erasmus’s Sword and D’Alviano’s Pen”

Time: 1pm
Date: Thursday 12 April
Place: Rogers Room (Level 3, John Woolley Building A20), University of Sydney

Lunch will be provided, so please RSVP by Friday 6 April if you intend to come, and would like lunch (daniel.anlezark@sydney.edu.au). Please advise of any dietary requirements.

Prof Kimberley Reynolds, Institute of Advanced Studies UWA Free Public Lecture

“Reading for Little Rebels: internationalism and radical writing for children”

A public lecture by Kimberley Reynolds, Professor of Children’s Literature, School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics, Newcastle University and 2018 Institute of Advanced Studies Visiting Fellow.

Date: Tuesday 3rd April, 2018
Time: 6:00pm-7:30pm
Venue: Fox Lecture Theatre, Arts Building, The University of Western Australia
RSVP: http://www.ias.uwa.edu.au/lectures/kimberleyreynolds.

In our current turbulent times, International Children’s Book Day (ICBD) is a good moment to reflect on the ways that children’s literature has attempted to spread the values of peace, understanding and mutual respect between countries, the need to share resources, and the importance of thinking globally rather than nationalistically. These were also the aims of the radical children’s books published in the first half of the last century in an attempt to encourage children to work to build a progressive, egalitarian, peaceful and sustainable modern world. Many of these books were either first published in the Soviet Union or were concerned with events there, so it is fitting that in 2017, the centenary of the Russian Revolution, Russia is the section of IBBY (the International Board on Books for Young People) that is sponsoring ICBD. Growing up in Melbourne in the 1940s and 1950s, the noted Soviet cultural historian, Sheila Fitzpatrick, recalls reading some of these books and thinking “what fun people seemed to have there…how totally unlike anything in Melbourne”. She was particularly struck by the ways these books offered a collective expectation of a better future.

This talk will present a selection of radical works from the first half of the last century and consider whether current writing for children similarly cultivates visions and skills that will help the rising generation believe in and build a better future.


Kimberley Reynolds is the Professor of Children’s Literature in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University in the UK. In 2013 she received the International Brothers Grimm Award for her contributions to the field of children’s literature research. She conceived and was the first Director of the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature and was involved in founding the UK’s Children’s Laureate and setting up Seven Stories: the National Centre for Children’s Books. She is a Past President of the International Research Society for Children’s Literature and was the first Senior Honorary Fellow of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions at The University of Western Australia. Currently she is Senior Editor of International Research in Children’s Literature and editing, with Michael Rosen and Jane Rosen, an anthology of left-wing writing for children in Britain from 1900-1963 titled Reading and Rebellion (forthcoming spring 2018). Recent publications include Children’s Literature in the Oxford University series of Very Short Introductions (2012) and Left Out: The Forgotten Tradition of Radical Publishing for Children in Britain, 1910-1949 (2016).

Free Public Lecture by Prof Evelyn Welch @ The University of Melbourne

Free Public Lecture: “Skin Deep: Reading Emotion on Early Modern Bodies”, Prof Evelyn Welch
Date: Wednesday 11 April, 2018
Time: 6:00pm-7:15pm
Venue: Lowe Theatre, Redmond Barry Building, Tin Alley, The University of Melbourne, Parkville
Registrations (FREE): https://www.trybooking.com/book/event?eid=360437&
More information: http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/skin-deep-reading-emotion-on-early-modern-bodies

This lecture will explore the ways emotion was understood on the body’s surface and how this was represented both materially and visually in early modern Europe. Based on traditional medical theories, early modern skin was often described as a ‘fishing net’, something that held the body in place and offered a decorative surface but had no function of its own. At the same time, the body’s surface also told you about its interior wellbeing. Learning to read the body meant both examining the exterior and sampling the interior’s waste products ranging from urine to hair and tears.

This approach was as true of animals as it was of people. Manuals described how to read faces and skin, and argued for and against blushing. You could also predict astrological futures by reading the lines on foreheads as well as on hands (a topic known as chiromancy) and even predict fate according to the number and site of spots and moles. Even more importantly, however, was the ability to combine all these forms of inspections with the ability to diagnose understanding humoural disorders ranging from love-sickness, a form of melancholy, to an excess of blood leading to anger.


Evelyn Welch is Professor of Renaissance Studies and Provost (Arts and Sciences) at King’s College London. She has been working on how we learn from things that were made in the past for many years. Writing about clothing, politics and social order, she uses sensory information as well as archival documents to explore the ‘period body’ in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe. Professor Welch is the author of numerous books, including Art in Renaissance Italy (Oxford, 2000), Shopping in the Renaissance, Yale, 2005, The Material Renaissance (Manchester, 2007), Making and Marketing Medicine in Renaissance Florence (Rodopi, 2011) and Fashioning the Early Modern: Dress, Textiles and Innovation in Europe, 1500-1800 (Oxford, 2017). Professor Welch is now leading a major Wellcome-Trust funded project on Renaissance Skin, designed to explore how human and animal skin were conceptualised in Europe between 1500 and 1700.

Illuminating the World of the Rothschild Prayer Book: Lecture by Professor Michelle P. Brown

Illuminating the World of the Rothschild Prayer Book: Lecture by Professor Michelle P. Brown

When Tuesday 23 January 2018 06:00PM

Venue State Library Theatre

Details Professor Michelle P. Brown,  Professor Emerita of Medieval Manuscript Studies at the University of London, presents the world of medieval illuminated manuscripts, their makers and readers, in the context of the famous Rothschild Prayer Book.  This beautiful 16th century Renaissance masterpiece is a jewel in The Kerry Stokes Collection in Perth. Images of the Rothschild Prayer Book and Professor Michelle P. Brown are presented in partnership with Kerry Stokes Collection.

https://www.slwa.wa.gov.au/whats-on/events-exhibitions/illuminating-world-rothschild-prayer-book-lecture-professor-michelle-p

Public Lecture by Prof. Lyndal Roper at The University of Melbourne

‘Luther and Dreams’

A public lecture by Prof. Lyndal Roper (University of Oxford) at The University of Melbourne.

Date: Monday 4 December 2017

Time: 6.15–7.30pm

Room 153 (Forum Theatre)

Level 1, Arts West North Wing

The University of Melbourne

Parkville VIC 301

Registrations: http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/lutheranddreams

Information: http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/luther-and-dreams/

Enquiries: che-melb-admin@unimelb.edu.au

This lecture marks the 1517–2017 quincentenary of the European Reformation, set in motion by Martin Luther in the German university town of Wittenberg.

Luther regularly labelled superstition, Catholic dogma, and the beliefs of the Turks and the Jews, as ‘dreams’. ‘Lauter somnia’, pure dreams, was one of his favourite insults, and he liked nothing better than to debunk them. Yet Luther was also fascinated by signs and portents, and though he often joked about dreams, he too noted important dreams. Dreams also happened to be recorded at key turning points of the Reformation, and they give rare insight into Luther’s deepest anxieties and feelings. Discussed collectively, Luther and his followers used dream interpretations to communicate concerns they did not discuss explicitly. This lecture explores how historians can make use of dreams to understand the subjectivity of people in the past.

The lecture is co-hosted by the History Discipline of The University of Melbourne.

Professor Lyndal Roper is Regius Professor of History, Oriel College, University of Oxford, and one of the world’s most renowned historians of early modern times. She is the first woman, and the first Australian, to hold the Regius Chair, and in 2016 she received the prestigious Gerda Henkel prize for her ‘trailblazing’ work on social, gender, and psychological history in the age of the Reformation. Her latest book, Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet (Random House, 2017), is the first historical biography of Luther to be published in English for many decades. She is now writing a history of the German Peasants’ War (1524–1525), the greatest uprising in Western Europe before the French Revolution. Professor Roper is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Australian Academy of the Humanities, and the Brandenburg Akademie der Wissenschaften; she is also a member of the International Advisory Board of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.

 

Luther and Dreams Public Lecture

‘Luther and Dreams’
A public lecture by Prof. Lyndal Roper (University of Oxford) at The University of Melbourne.
 

Date: Monday 4 December 2017
Time: 6.15–7.30pm
Room 153 (Forum Theatre)
Level 1, Arts West North Wing
The University of Melbourne
Parkville VIC 301
 
Registrations:  http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/lutheranddreams
Information: http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/luther-and-dreams/ 
Enquiries: che-melb-admin@unimelb.edu.au
 
This lecture marks the 1517–2017 quincentenary of the European Reformation, set in motion by Martin Luther in the German university town of Wittenberg.
 
Luther regularly labelled superstition, Catholic dogma, and the beliefs of the Turks and the Jews, as ‘dreams’. ‘Lauter somnia’, pure dreams, was one of his favourite insults, and he liked nothing better than to debunk them. Yet Luther was also fascinated by signs and portents, and though he often joked about dreams, he too noted important dreams. Dreams also happened to be recorded at key turning points of the Reformation, and they give rare insight into Luther’s deepest anxieties and feelings. Discussed collectively, Luther and his followers used dream interpretations to communicate concerns they did not discuss explicitly. This lecture explores how historians can make use of dreams to understand the subjectivity of people in the past.
 
The lecture is co-hosted by the History Discipline of The University of Melbourne and the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotion.

Professor Lyndal Roper is Regius Professor of History, Oriel College, University of Oxford, and one of the world’s most renowned historians of early modern times. She is the first woman, and the first Australian, to hold the Regius Chair, and in 2016 she received the prestigious Gerda Henkel prize for her ‘trailblazing’ work on social, gender, and psychological history in the age of the Reformation. Her latest book, Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet (Random House, 2017), is the first historical biography of Luther to be published in English for many decades. She is now writing a history of the German Peasants’ War (1524–1525), the greatest uprising in Western Europe before the French Revolution. Professor Roper is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Australian Academy of the Humanities, and the Brandenburg Akademie der Wissenschaften; she is also a member of the International Advisory Board of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.

University of Sydney – August Events

1. Department of Classics and Ancient History Research Seminar Series, Semester 2, 2017

Note especially:

22nd Todd Memorial Lecture: Professor Greg Woolf

Institute of Classical Studies, University of London

How Cosmopolitan was Imperial Rome?

Thursday 24 August 6.00pm

General Lecture Theatre Quadrangle, A14

See attached for complete program for Semester 2

2. Obsession and Philanthropy: The Dante Collection in Fisher Library

Professor Nerida Newbigin will talk about Dante Alighieri, the illustrated manuscripts and printed editions of the Divine Comedy, and individuals who shaped the collection: Sir Charles Nicholson, Dr WJS McKay and Professor Frederick May

Thursday, 24 August 1:00pm–1:30pm

Charles Perkins Centre Hub Level 6 Seminar Room, Camperdown/Darlington

Registration required and more information at:

http://usyd.libcal.com/event/3440337

Event organizer Julie Sommerfeldt

GDE Error: Error retrieving file - if necessary turn off error checking (404:Not Found)
3. To be or not to be? How to be cultured: Shakespeare & the arts in the 21st century

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences, U of Sydney

It’s part of the ‘Outside the Square’ program. The panel is Huw Griffiths, Kip Williams, Artistic Director of the STC, and playwright Alana Valentine.

Thursday 31 August 6.00pm–8:30pm

$15 Students

$20 Alumni

$25 Friends

To register and for more information:

http://sydney.edu.au/arts/outsidethesquare/the_season.shtml#still?cid=em_se-aug-2017

 

OVERSEAS

CARMEN – The Worldwide Medieval Network–Newsletter August 2017

Information about

CARMEN Annual Meeting in Ghent, Belgium

CARMEN at the International Medieval Congress in Leeds (July 3-6 2017)

CARMEN Members and their Projects-Digitising Patterns of Poer

Early Career Research-vacancies, funds, fellowships, grants and jobs

Events and New Projects

http://mailchi.mp/opayq/carmen-newsletter-august-2017?e=2401eb6695

 

The University of Sydney: Seminars Italian Studies and Global Middle Ages

The University of Sydney: Seminars Italian Studies and Global Middle Ages

Italian Studies Research Seminar Series, first meeting Semester 2
“Dante’s Commedia and Distant Reading: A New Approach”, Jacob Blakesley, University of Leeds

Date: Thursday, 10 August 2017
Time: 4:15pm-6:00pm
Venue: SLC Common Room (Brennan MacCallum Building, 7th floor)
More information: francesco.borghesi@sydney.edu.au

In the seven centuries of Dante scholarship, there has been little comparative research on the translation and circulation of Dante’s Commedia. Only two edited collections include panoramic essays on translations of the Commedia into a number of languages. This is most likely due to the striking fact that there exists no bibliography of worldwide translations of the Commedia. No one knows how many translations there have been into major and minor languages; nor how many times each cantica has been translated, nor how many translators there have been. This paper describes the initial work-in-progress stage of a new project, which will catalogue all the worldwide published translations of the Commedia, from the sixteenth century until today. Adopting a distant-reading, quantitative methodology, inscribed within a sociological approach to literary translation, this project will be the first study to map and study the circulation and translation of Dante’s Commedia across the globe. This paper will address the methodology for this study (relying on different sources, ranging from Worldcat, national libraries, and UNESCO’s Index Translationum to printed bibliographies), and describe the expected outcomes of the project.

JACOB BLAKESLEY is currently a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in Translation Studies and a University Academic Fellow in World Literatures at the University of Leeds. His monograph, Modern Italian Poets: Translators of the Impossible, was published by the University of Toronto Press in 2014. He recently edited, with Jeremy Munday, a special journal issue of Translation and Literature entitled ‘Poetry Translation: Agents, Actors, Networks, Contexts’ (2016). His book in progress is called ‘Poets of Europe: Translators of the World’, which shows the dramatically different translation practices of English, French, and Italian poet-translators. He has published articles on literary translation and Italian poetry in various journals, such as Allegoria, Italica, Lettere Italiane, Moderna, Semicerchio, and Testo a Fronte.


Global Middle Ages seminar series, Semester 2

  • Wed 16 August – Prof Constant J. Mews (Monash University) [rescheduled from May)]: Rethinking Religious History in Global Perspective: Songlines, Sacred Stories and Theologies
  • Wed 30 August – Dr Michael Abrahams-Sprod (FASS-SLC, Department of Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies): Sanctifying God’s Name: The Ethos of Jewish Martyrdom in Medieval Ashkenaz (Germany)
  • Wed 20 September – Anne Dunlop (University of Melbourne): Mongol Eurasia and Cangrande’s Silk Suit
  • Wed 25 October – Prof Dominique Barbe (University of Noumea, New Caledonia): Oceania in the Middle Ages: A Connected World

Date and time: Wednesdays: 4:00pm-5:30pm
Venue: Kevin Lee Room (Quadrangle Building, Level 6, [Brennan MacCallum Building])
For more details and abstracts: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/research/global_middle_ages
More information: helene.sirantoine@sydney.edu.au

Dr Adelina Modesti, The University of Melbourne Early Modern Circle Talk

The University of Melbourne, Early Modern Circle Public Lecture:

“The Female Virtuosa at the Court of Medici Grand Duchess Vittoria della Rovere: Ladies-in-waiting, Artists, Musicians, Actresses and Writers”,
Dr Adelina Modesti (La Trobe University)

Date: 21 August, 2017
Time: 6:15pm
Venue: North Theatre, Old Arts, The University of Melbourne

This paper will address the cultural patronage (“matronage”) of Grand Duchess of Tuscany Vittoria della Rovere via an examination of the virtuoso women artists, musicians and writers she supported throughout her long life. Victoria was an active matron of the arts who gathered round her some of the most important female cultural producers of the day, sponsoring their creative work and developing their talent. Some of these women were her ladies-in-waiting, whom she educated as artists, musicians or embroiderers as part of their cultural development and future roles at the Medici court. Others were professional artists whom she patronized or called to her court as resident artists. In particular Vittoria appreciated the cultural production of the painters Giovanna Garzoni, Elisabetta Sirani, Margherita Caffi, Camilla Guerrieri Nati, Giovanna Fratellini; the composer Barbara Strozzi; singers Francesca Caccini and her daughter Margherita Signorini, Luisa Marsia, Maria Caterina Piccioli; the actress Beatrice Vitali; and the writers Arcangela Tarabotti, Maria Selvaggia Borghini and Barbara Tigliamochi degli Albizzi. The paper will finish with a discussion of Le Assicurate, the all female literary academy founded in Siena in 1654 under the “patroncinio” of Vittoria della Rovere. Unpublished archival material from the Archivio di Stato di Firenze will introduce some of these women, whilst new light will be shed on the art and lives of others.