ANZAMEMS Development Scheme (ADS)

Dear ANZAMEMS ECRs and HDR Students,

In pre-covid times ANZAMEMS funded PATS (Postgraduate Advanced Training Seminars), which brought HDR students and ECRs together for skills and methods seminars. Since the beginning of the pandemic, it has not been possible to run these workshops for obvious reasons.

So, we’ve decided to try something different. In second semester 2021, beginning in mid to late September, we are going to offer a virtual seminar series, organised by the cohort for the cohort. We will offer seven two-hour sessions, held fortnightly. The program will offer a mix of career development and state of the field/s reflections. We will have three sessions devoted to the job market, offering reflections on how the sector works in different locations focusing on the USA, the UK and the European Union, and Australasia. We will also offer two sessions that focus on timely issues and challenges in the field of Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Finally, we will offer two sessions devoted to methodological issues, designed to offer insights into working with particular types of sources, or with relatively new theoretical paradigms.

We have not yet decided on the times and dates for these sessions, as we will seek information from participants about their availability, and work to accommodate as many people as possible.

In the past, we have offered face to face sessions that enabled skill-based training in things like palaeography. The virtual does not lend itself to that sort of training, but we promise we plan to return to face to face training in the future. For now, however, we hope that this new format will provide equally valuable advice and support in different areas of development.

Should you wish to apply to join this seminar series, please email Clare Monagle clare.monagle@mq.edu.au by 22 August to register your interest, supplying the information below. Participation is only open to ANZAMEMS members.

  1. Name;
  2. Brief Bio (100 Words);
  3. Reason for Interest (100 Words);
  4. Preferred Times and Days of Week for Sessions (please provide as many as possible);

Numbers are not capped, but we ask that participants commit to the entirety of program (pending timing), as we are keen to provide a supportive and open space and offer an opportunity for relationship building as well as career development.

Call for Expressions of Interest: ANZAMEMS 2024 Conference

ANZAMEMS welcomes Expression of Interests for its 2024 Conference.

By convention, the next host would normally be a venue in New Zealand.

Up to $35,000 in conference funding is provided to the successful host institution(s).

The ANZAMEMS Conference Policy can be downloaded on the Conference page of the Association’s website (Version effective July 2021): https://www.anzamems.org/?page_id=7.

A copy of the Association’s Equity and Inclusivity Guidelines for ANZAMEMS Conference and Event Planners can be downloaded from the Diversity and Equity page of the Association’s website. (Version effective 16 February 2018): https://www.anzamems.org/?page_id=9826

For further information, please contact:
Dr Helen Young, President, Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval & Early Modern Studies. Email: president@anzamems.org.

ANZAMEMS 2022 Conference CFP – Panel on Aesthetics in Medieval and Early Modern Poetry

We invite scholarly proposals for papers on aesthetics in medieval and early modern poetry (c. 400 to 1800), as part of a panel or panels being established at ANZAMEMS 2022. The link to the main website and call for papers is here: https://www.anzamems2021.com/

The panel(s) will examine the influence of aesthetic styles, movements, rhetorical and aesthetic techniques and theories on the development of poetry, or the work of specified poet(s) at any time during the relevant periods in Europe and Britain. Papers should be set within the broader topic of the overall conference, and deal with questions of reception and/or emotion. Speakers might consider:

· The role of emotions in medieval or early modern aesthetic theories;

· Models of embodiment in aesthetic theories during the period;

· Theories of affect, affectus and/or feelings;

· The impact of theological and biblical sources (for example, by Augustine and Aquinas);

· The impact of philosophy of mind/body, metaphysics and ethics (such as the Platonic and Aristotelian);

· Formal theories of poetics and rhetoric, including the role of style in rhetorical figures and tropes;

· The impact of artistic movements (such as Neoplatonist, Neoclassical, Baroque) and the reciprocal influence of visual arts on poetry (eg ut pictura poiesis);

· Public and private models of ‘taste’, audience and reception;

· The role of pleasure, the imagination and sensuous and vivid imagery;

· Techniques for the aestheticization of the sacred (such as the poetics of enigma);

· Theories of the sublime and the beautiful;

· Participatory versus objectivist aesthetics;

· Materialist, or transcendental and idealist models;

· Poststructural or psychoanalytic approaches; or

· The role and value of historicist and/or modern theory.

We invite submissions for 20 minute presentations, followed by 5 minutes of Q&A. If you are interested in presenting your work, please send any questions, or otherwise the title, a 200 word abstract and a 50 word biography, at the first instance to Dr Jane Vaughan at jane.vaughan@uwa.edu.au

Deadline for Panel Submissions: 12 October 2021

The panel(s) will be held as part of the biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, at the School of Humanities, The University of Western Australia, Perth, 27 June to 1 July, 2022

CFP: Reception, Emotion, and the Crusades, panels at ANZAMEMS Conference, 27 June–1 July 2022

The theme for the 2022 ANZAMEMS (Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies) conference is ‘Reception and Emotion’. Professor Megan Cassidy-Welch (Australian Catholic University) and Dr Beth Spacey (University of Queensland) are inviting proposals for 20-minute papers to be part of a strand of themed panels examining aspects of reception and/or emotion, broadly conceived, in a crusading context. Please send your 200-word abstracts and paper title, along with a short bio (max. 50 words), to Beth (b.spacey@uq.edu.au) by 30 September 2021.

The thirteenth biennial ANZAMEMS Conference will be held on 27 June to 1 July 2022 in Perth at the University of Western Australia. More information, including details regarding travel bursaries, is available here.

Eleonora di Toledo at 500, Call for Papers

CFP RSA Dublin Wednesday March 30- Saturday April 2 2022!

Eleonora di Toledo at 500

2022 marks the five hundredth anniversary of the presumed birth of Eleonora di Toledo. The past thirty years have witnessed the publication of numerous studies that have fundamentally changed our image of the duchess of Florence from a passive object of her husband’s will to an active collaborator in the construction of an autocratic state. These panels seek new contributions about Eleonora di Toledo from all disciplines. Some themes that might be explored are “The Literary Eleonora;” “The Posthumous Eleonora;” “Eleonora in the 1550s.” Comparative approaches to the political and economic activities and the artistic, literary, musical, and religious patronage of other contemporary ruling women are especially welcome.

Proposals should be sent by August 2 to Bruce Edelstein at edelstein@nyu.edu or Natalie Tomas at natalie.tomas@monash.edu. Please include a title (15 words max), an abstract (150 words max), and a short CV (300 words max).

Centre for Early Modern Studies ANU Inaugural Seminar

What is Early Modern History?

Please join us in person or through the Zoom platform for our Inaugural Seminar on Tuesday July 13, when Professor Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks will talk about her latest book, What Is Early Modern History?, which was published in March in the Polity ‘What Is History?’ series.

The work offers a concise guide to historical research from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, within and beyond Europe, including subfields and approaches to the period. She will discuss how she conceptualized and wrote it, and the ways this changed while writing during the COVID pandemic. The seminar will be followed by a Q&A and discussion.

See the following flier for further information:

Centre for Ancient Cultural Heritage & Environment Fellowships Closing Soon!

CACHE is offering two fellowships for the second half of 2021 in the fields of archaeological science, cultural heritage, and/or environmental heritage. Applications close Tuesday 6th July 2021.

CACHE Early Career Indigenous Australian Research Fellowship
Award: up to $5000
Award Type: HDR, postdoctoral, or heritage/environment professional Indigenous Australian research fellow
Length: Three weeks to six months (must be completed by 15th December, 2021)

CACHE Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Award: up to $5000
Award Type: Postdoctoral research fellow
Length: Three weeks to six months (must be completed by 15th December, 2021)

Please refer to the website for full guidelines. Inquiries should be directed to: cache@mq.edu.au.

Classical Reformations: Beyond Christian Humanism, Online conference hosted by the Warburg Institute, 2-3 Sep. 2021

Convenors: Dr Micha Lazarus and Dr Lucy Nicholas (Warburg Institute)

Christian humanism has dominated the story of classical reception in Reformation Europe, as the first Erasmian generation of reformers retooled classical texts to Christian ends. Yet the utility of the classical tradition to later generations of reformers has been largely overlooked by modern scholarship. We propose that as the Reformation evolved, the influence of classical learning was as likely to flow in the other direction: that the literature and ideas of the ancient world had a formative influence on Christian politics and theology. Major Reformation figures—from Melanchthon, Sturm, Ascham, and Beza, to many of their Catholic opponents, such as Pole and Bellarmine—were scholars by day, as comfortable with Catullus as Corinthians. Their classical learning actively empowered and shaped the formulation of Christian faith during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Classical Reformations: Beyond Christian Humanism explores how the literature and ideas of the classical world calibrated early modern Christianity—its interpretation, ordinances, moral instruction, politics, theology, cultural expression, and polarizing impulses of confessionalisation. How did classical learning fill the gaps in the Lutheran rejection of Catholic doctrine? How did classical poetry and drama shape the Roman Church’s popular outreach after the Council of Trent? How did classical history and rhetoric inflect the turbulent politics of the Reformation? Looking beyond the Christian absorption of pagan material and Erasmian humanism redux, this conference focuses instead on a classical Christianity, even a Greco-Roman monotheism, in the generations after Erasmus. Where recent scholarship has replaced confessionalism at the heart of early modern philology, we aim to replace classicism at the heart of theology and religious politics. The classical tradition was too ubiquitous and authoritative a presence in early modern intellectual life to have left theology untouched.

This international conference will take place online over two days, hosted by the Warburg Institute. Speakers include leading and upcoming scholars from Belgium, Canada, Croatia, Denmark, France, Hong Kong, Italy, Spain, the United States, and the United Kingdom, and a keynote address will be given by Prof. Ralph Keen (University of Illinois at Chicago).

The event is free via Zoom with advance registration. For further information please see the website.

Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand 2021 Conference: Call for papers

The Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand 2021 Conference will be hosted online from Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland on 22-23 November 2021.

The conference theme is Communities, books and the power of words.

We invite papers that explore the intersections and dynamics between communities, books and power. These could include reflections on texts and their uses to inspire, transform or suppress communities, or the ways in which people have resisted or subverted systems of power in and through bibliographic-related domains or means. Papers could look to the past or the future or contribute to current discussions generated by international movements examining power, including in heritage, cultural and academic institutions.

To find out more about BSANZ, the 2021 conference and the call for papers, which closes on 21 June, go to: bsanz.org

AEMA Conference CFP on Eruption/Disruption/Interruption!


Conference October 1-2, 2021!

The conference committee invites papers on the theme of Eruption/Disruption/Interruption. As we continue to process the impact of COVID-19 on global and local societies, the jury is still out on whether the eruption of a global pandemic, and the subsequent disruptions and interruptions to contemporary routines, are a ‘game-changer’ or an inconvenience.

At the heart of our theme is the concept of a rupture. This can refer to something that has broken, burst, or been destroyed. It can imply that either outside forces are too great for the structure in question and have destroyed it functionally, or that something within that which has ruptured was too volatile or incompatible to remain contained, controlled, or unified. Over the past 18 months, we have been witness to both of these types of rupture, as outside forces have challenged the very foundations of our society, while at the same time, internal tensions have broken forth and resulted in historic movements for democracy, equality, environmental awareness, and corporate accountability and transparency.

Global society is at a turning point of multiple ruptured points, and the 2021 AEMA conference aims to reflect on this tension in an early medieval context.

· Eruptions can be understood in many different ways, as they can describe both natural phenomena and human activity, including the sudden appearance of new movements, of groups of people, or of ideas.

· Were eruptions revolutionary? Or were they merely a disruption to the longue durée?

· Does hindsight make it easier to identify ruptures as epoch-altering events and ideas? Or does the passage of time, and attendant loss of witnesses, memories, and evidence muddy the waters too much?

· Why and in what ways did eruptions change things? And why and in what ways did they merely disrupt.

· When and how does an interruption become a disruption?

· What did the idea of a ‘new normal’ mean in the early medieval world? How quickly do societies adapt to internal and external pressures?

· And when societies change as a result of these pressures, are they still the same society?

This conference calls for papers that relate to this theme. Or, in the spirit of the theme, those that do not.

In 2021, AEMA intends to hold a hybrid conference, with both a physical location (or locations) as well as an online option. At this stage, the main physical location is likely to be in Victoria, with the potential for additional ‘hubs’ to be held in other Australian and/or International locations, depending on interest and availability.

Submissions may be in the form of individual papers of 20 minutes duration, themed panels of three 20-minute papers, or Round Tables of up to six shorter papers (total of one hour).

All sessions will include time for questions and general discussion. Please send proposals (150–200 words per paper), along with author’s name, paper/panel/RT title, and academic affiliation (if any) to conference@aema.net.au by 31 July 2021. Please also direct all other enquiries about the conference to this address, as well as any nominations for potentially hosting an in-person hub.