Monthly Archives: June 2020

CFP: Australian and New Zealand Law and History Society Conference

39th Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Law and History Society, Auckland, 9-12 December 2020

Revised Call for Papers: “One Empire, Many Colonies, Similar or Different Histories?”

Abstracts are invited from scholars bringing historical perspectives on law who wish to gather at The University of Auckland and AUT University – there to listen to and discuss papers and panels on aspects of law in history.

Since the impact of COVID-19, travel restrictions and university funding deficits, we now also seek expressions of interest from those who may wish to present a paper to a dual format conference or virtual-only conference if either possibility turns out to be feasible.

The 2020 theme invites a comparative lens on British imperial and colonial histories but other law in history topics will be favourably considered. Proposals from postgraduate and early career researchers are welcome. Individual paper proposals and panel proposals must include an abstract (no more than 300 words) and a biographical statement (no more than 100 words per speaker).

All abstracts must be submitted to Karen Fairweather: k.fairweather@auckland.ac.nz by
31 July 2020

See the attached call for papers for more information.

NTEU Carolyn Allport Scholarship for Postgraduate Feminist Studies by Research – Call for applications 2020

The Carolyn Allport Scholarship is available for a woman undertaking postgraduate feminist studies, by research, in any discipline, awarding $5000 per year for a maximum of 3 years to the successful applicant. Applicants must be currently enrolled in postgraduate studies, by research, in an academic award of an Australian public university. This scholarship has been created in recognition of Dr Carolyn Allport’s contribution to the leadership and development of the Union in her 16 years as National President.

Application deadline is 31 July 2020. A decision will be made in late August 2020.

For more information go to: http://www.nteu.org.au/myunion/scholarships or contact Helena Spyrou at: hspyrou@nteu.org.au or on 0419 339 259.

ACU Seminar Series: ‘Dante, Theologian at the End of Time’

The Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry at Australian Catholic University cordially invites you to attend lecture series by Prof. Denys Turner, hosted by the IRCI’s Religion & Theology program.

“Dante, Theologian of the End of Time” will include three separate lectures:

Wednesday 24 June, 8am AEST
Dante, Theologian-Poet
It doesn’t make a lot of difference to Dante if one calls him a medieval theologian, but it does make a great deal of difference to how one thinks of theology in the Middle Ages. This lecture explores the difference it makes for how we think about medieval theology to take the Comedy as a paradigm for theological work. One consequence is that letting Dante into the club relativises the theology of the university men by making their approach but one way of doing theology rather than definitive, which, by the same token, lets in a lot of women too.

Thursday 25 June 8am AEST
Dante, Augustine, and Confession
Curiously, Augustine does not appear by name in Dante’s Comedy. This lecture explores the possibility that this is because his influence on the theology of the poem is pervasive throughout its whole trajectory. It contributes something of significance to both theologies to compare the “confessing” strategies of them both.

Friday 26 June 8am AEST
Dante, Aquinas, and Hell
Recent critiques of “infernalist” theologies, in particular of Aquinas’s, raise the question of how far Dante’s Inferno entails a commitment to a doctrine of eternal punishment in hell for unrepentant sinners in the way in which Aquinas’ teachings on hell seem unmistakably to do. Do we have to read Inferno as descriptive, howsoever imaginatively, of a real condition of eternal punishment of unrepentant sinners? And if not, how may one legitimately read it as allegory?

Please send your RSPV to rachel.davies@acu.edu.au to receive a Zoom event link and instructions for joining. In order to ensure safety and security for our participants, you will not be able to join the lectures if you haven’t registered by email. However it isn’t necessary to confirm which of the three lectures you’d like to attend, as one RSVP will get you links for all three events.

CFP Annual Renaissance Society of America Meeting

“Women on the Move: Gender and Migration in the Early Modern Period”
Call for Papers – Panel at the 67th Annual Renaissance Society of America Meeting, 2020
Dublin, Ireland, April 7-10, 2021

Although globalization is thought to be a recent phenomenon, the early modern period saw an intense uptick in global migration, specifically within the European continent and throughout the Atlantic World. This panel seeks to explore the ways in which women navigated this newly global system through structures of voluntary and forced migration for a variety of religious, social, and economic reasons. Women migrated as wives, laborers, missionaries, indentured servants, and enslaved persons. This panel especially seeks proposals that are committed to interdisciplinary and intersectional approaches that are historically sensitive and theoretically innovative. In analyzing the specific ways early modern women’s gender affected their experience of migration in the Atlantic world, this panel broadens the conversation of early modern globalization.

Paper topics might include but are not limited to:

-Women’s travel writings
-The intersection of religion, gender, and migration
-Gender, travel and migration in the early modern imagination
-The limits of women’s travel or migration
-Conceptions of travelling, gender, and “the Other” in the early modern world
-Migration and gender in the context of emerging settler colonial systems
-Migration as a mode of increased globalization
-Migration, colonialization, and the early modern economy

Please send a CV, a presentation title, and a 150-word abstract to the session organizer Kelly Douma Kaelin (ked17@psu.edu). In addition, please detail any A/V requirements that you expect to have.

All presenters must register for the 67th Annual Renaissance Society of America Meeting, be committed to attending the conference in Dublin, and make their own travel arrangements.

For more information about the RSA Annual Meeting, please see the conference website.

The deadline for the submission of materials for this panel is Saturday, August 1, 2020.

Medieval and Early Modern Orients

Medieval and Early Modern Orients (MEMOs) is an AHRC-funded project that seeks to further knowledge and understanding of the early interactions between England and the Islamic worlds. Through our pages and our blog we hope to create an accessible space to reveal the exciting discoveries of researchers as they navigate the seas of history and literature, and investigate the intersecting webs of our pasts.

Like the engagements it explores, MEMOs is also a point of engagement. It is a space for researchers, practitioners and anyone with an interest to connect and stay up-to-date with news and events in the field, as well as the work of colleagues and specialists. By this we hope to build a network of knowledge and appreciation around the longstanding global relationships that continue to define our interconnected identities and shape our world.

MEMOs welcomes new contributors, particularly those based in Australasia.

New member publication: Feeling Exclusion

Congratulations to ANZAMEMS member Charles Zika on the publication of a new collection, Feeling Exclusion: Religious Conflict, Exile and Emotions in Early Modern Europe (Routledge, 2019) co-edited with Giovanni Tarantino. The volume features a number of essays by ANZAMEMS members.

Feeling Exclusion: Religious Conflict, Exile and Emotions in Early Modern Europe investigates the emotional experience of exclusion at the heart of the religious life of persecuted and exiled individuals and communities in early modern Europe.

Between the late fifteenth and early eighteenth centuries an unprecedented number of people in Europe were forced to flee their native lands and live in a state of physical or internal exile as a result of religious conflict and upheaval. Drawing on new insights from history of emotions methodologies, Feeling Exclusion explores the complex relationships between communities in exile, the homelands from which they fled or were exiled, and those from whom they sought physical or psychological assistance. It examines the various coping strategies religious refugees developed to deal with their marginalization and exclusion, and investigates the strategies deployed in various media to generate feelings of exclusion through models of social difference, that questioned the loyalty, values, and trust of “others”.

Accessibly written, divided into three thematic parts, and enhanced by a variety of illustrations, Feeling Exclusion is perfect for students and researchers of early modern emotions and religion.

ANZAMEMS members wishing to promote their research through the ANZAMEMS newsletter are invited to email the editor, Lisa Rolston.

Zoom Seminar: Reindert Falkenburg, ‘Pieter Brugel: Grounds for Speculation’

The members of the Medieval and Early Modern Studies program at ACU are delighted to invite you to attend our next virtual seminar on June 18 at 4:00 PM AEST (GMT +10):

“Pieter Bruegel: Grounds for Speculation” presented by Reindert Falkenburg (New York University / Abu Dhabi)

Lisa Beaven (La Trobe) will offer a response.

The poster for the seminar is attached below. To RSVP and to receive the pre-circulated paper along with Zoom details to join the meeting, please email: michael.barbezat@acu.edu.au.

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