Daily Archives: 19 February 2020

ANZAMEMS 2021 Bursaries and Prizes

Applications for the following ANZAMEMS 2021 conference bursaries and prizes are now open:

ANZAMEMS Conference Travel Bursaries

To enable current or recent Postgraduates and Early Career Researchers who are currently not in full-time employment to attend the ANZAMEMS Biennial Conference and deliver a paper at a session, travel bursaries will be offered.

Bursaries will be awarded on a competitive basis and are scaled on the basis of distance from the venue (up to $300 for recipients travelling from regional WA; $500 from other Australian states and territories; and $1000 for those travelling internationally). Delegates from Perth are ineligible to apply.

It is not expected that Conference Convenors will be able to offer a bursary to every eligible applicant. In the event of there being more eligible applicants than can be supported, the ANZAMEMS Conference Committee will rank applicants according to distance travelled, financial need, current employment status, and access to other sources of funding.

Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary

One of the conference bursary applicants will be selected for the Kim Walker Travel Bursary, which is awarded in honour of Kim Walker, who taught in the English program at Victoria University of Wellington. The prize is currently set at $AUD 500.

Postgraduate students from New Zealand who have applied for a Travel Bursary before the relevant deadline will automatically be considered for the Kim Walker Postgraduate Travel Bursary. A separate application is not necessary.

George Yule Essay Prize

The George Yule Prize is awarded to the best essay written by a postgraduate. It is awarded biennially, at each ANZAMEMS Conference. The winner will receive a travel bursary for assistance in attending the conference, $AUD 500 in prize money, and a year’s free subscription to Parergon.

For more information and application forms please see https://www.anzamems2021.com/busaries-prizes

The deadline for all bursary and prize applications is 31 July 2020.

‘Warfare, Weapons, Wounds – An Interdisciplinary Workshop’ 10-11 December 2020, University of Auckland, New Zealand

If death and injury are central to warfare, so are the tools that cause bodily harm. This inter- disciplinary workshop, hosted by the University of Auckland’s ‘War in Context’ research hub, explores the cultures of violence and control that form around military weaponry by focusing on the wounds they inflict and the (at least perceived) pain and suffering they provoke. It investigates the ways in which individuals, communities, states, and militaries imagine, represent, adapt, and receive military technologies in the context of their wounding capacity.

We invite proposals for papers (30min, followed by 10min for questions and discussion) that focus on particular weapons (or types of weapons), the context in which they are used, and the ‘wounds’ they cause. We welcome papers from any historical period, including today, and hope to attract scholars from a wide range of disciplines and cultural perspectives. As such, ‘wounds’ can, and indeed should, be interpreted in a broad way and can encompass not only physical, but psychological, social, cultural, and political damage.

It is planned that the workshop will form the core of a publication – either an edited collection or special edition of an academic journal.

Proposals should include a title, an abstract (no more than 250 words), and a brief biography (no more than 250 words). We welcome proposals from scholars at all stages of their careers, including graduate students and early career scholars.

Proposals should be submitted through this submission portal by 1 June 2020.

There may be a small registration fee to help cover catering and other costs. If you would like to attend, even if not offering a paper, please also note your interest here by 1 June 2020 and you will be sent registration information once that is available.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact one of the conference organizers: Maartje Abbenhuis (m.abbenhuis@auckland.ac.nz), Jeremy Armstrong (js.armstrong@auckland.ac.nz), and Thomas Gregory (t.gregory@auckland.ac.nz).

CFP Australian Early Medieval Association Conference

Australian Early Medieval Association conference, 30 Sept-2 Oct 2020, The University of Western Australia

The conference committee invites papers on the theme Journeys: Discovery and Belonging. The period we study was marked by the disintegration of established political and social orders, widespread migrations and incursions, and rising competition between religious ideologies. Developing forms of inter-cultural contact and exchange gave rise to new ways of conceptualising and articulating identity and alterity, but while new boundaries – physical and ideational – were established, all boundaries remained porous. People, objects and ideas continued to circulate, to take journeys. How did existing communities and new migrants adapt to, or resist, each other? How were institutions modified to include, accommodate or exclude new worldviews? What was the role of material culture in holding fast to the old, and in legitimising and promoting new polities, new ethnicities, and new ideologies? How did cross-cultural contacts in the early medieval period shape history?

We invite submissions on the following topics:

• Exchange across borders- trade, culture, and human trafficking  • Maintaining and modifying identity • Maritime exploration • Invasion, settlement, assimilation. • Cultural geography: significant space and place • The book as traveller / the reader as voyager • Imagined otherworlds / imagined others • The idea and material expression of homelands • Emotions and journeys / emotional journeys • Pilgrimage and adventure • Travel narratives • First
contacts • Reading race and ethnicity: conflict and co-existence • Conversion and religious conflict • Accommodation and defiance—tensions in the quest to belong • Translation, adaptation, linguistic change • Viewing ‘Europe’ from outside • Afterlives of the early medieval in modern identity formation.

AEMA also welcomes papers concerned with all aspects of the Early Medieval period (c. 400–1150) in all cultural, geographic, religious and linguistic settings, even if they do not strictly adhere to the theme.

We especially encourage submissions from graduate students and early career researchers.
Abstracts of 150-200 words for 20-minute papers should be submitted via email to conference@aema.net.au by 31 May 2020.

Please see below for a downloadable copy of the conference CFP, and an additional call for contributions for a proposed panel at the conference on ‘Medieval Recreations’.

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