Monthly Archives: March 2019

CFP Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques

Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques (HRRH) has established a well-deserved reputation for publishing high quality articles of wide-ranging interest for over forty years. The journal, which publishes articles in both English and French, is committed to exploring history in an interdisciplinary framework and with a comparative focus. Historical approaches to art, literature, and the social sciences; the history of mentalities and intellectual movements; the terrain where religion and history meet: these are the subjects to which Historical Reflections is devoted. Contributions are invited from all fields of intellectual-cultural history and the history of religion and mentalities.

Some specific themes include:

  • Music history
  • Social policies and societal change (including studies with a comparative focus)
  • Material culture and emotions
  • Architectural and garden history
  • Small businesses
  • Colonial/imperial studies

Manuscript Submission

The editorial board welcomes submissions for publication in English or French. Authors should submit articles as email attachments, formatted as Microsoft Word or Rich Text Format files. Please note that all correspondence will take place via email. Send submissions and complete contact information to the editor, Elizabeth Macknight at e.macknight@abdn.ac.uk.

Have other questions? Please refer to the various Berghahn Info for Authors pages for general information and guidelines including topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors (www.berghahnjournals.com/historical-reflections).

Indexed in:

  • Arts & Humanities Citation Index (Web of Science)
  • Scopus
  • Historical Abstracts
  • ERIH PLUS

For a full listing of indices, please visit the website www.berghahnjournals.com/historical-reflections

Contact: info@berghahnjournals.com

CFP Mid-America Medieval Association Conference

Abstracts are invited for the 43rd Mid-America Medieval Association (MAMA) conference, “What Lies Beneath: Uncovering Structures, Subtexts, Skeletons”. The conference will take place on 14 September 2019 at the University of Missouri—Kansas City.

Plenary Speaker, Professor Kathryn Ann Smith, New York University

Papers on any aspect of medieval culture, medieval studies, and medievalism will be considered, but presentations that consider and/or (re)evaluate what lies beneath the surface of the discipline will be particularly welcome. Potential topics could include but are not limited to:

  • discussing excavating bodies in medieval graveyards
  • the structures of medieval books
  • the subtexts of medieval legal treatises
  • the underlying assumptions about race, sex, and gender found in both medieval sources and the scholarly work of medievalists
  • the underlying influences on medieval poetry
  • the foundations of the medieval motet
  • the materials used in producing goods
  • what “lies beneath” the profession of medieval studies

Proposals for either papers (abstracts limited to 250 words) or sessions (abstracts limited to 250 words along with a list of titles and presenters) should be sent via email attachment (MS Word preferred) to Linda Mitchell: mitchellli@umkc.edu

Deadline for proposals is 25 June 2019.

Symposium: The Surrounding Forest – Trees in the Medieval Imaginary

Registration is now open for the symposium The Surrounding Forest: Trees in the Medieval Imaginary. This will take place at Birkbeck College, University of London on 22 June, 2019 and is hosted by Medieval Ecocriticisms and N/EMICS.

This one-day symposium aims to explore the image of the tree as a conduit for the exploration of human engagements with environment in the global middle ages, broadly defined, and seeks to encourage cross-cultural, trans-national, and interdisciplinary understanding of the role of trees, woodland, and other vegetation in various contexts. We want to better understand human responses to nature. What is it about ‘arboreal beauty’ that connects it with the divine? Recognized across cultures as axis mundi, the tree shoots upwards, its trunk and branches stretching, reaching, growing towards the light as it seeks to bridge the in-between space that divides earth from the heavens. The liminal quality of foliage, trees, and forests is recognized by artists and weavers of images across the world.

A full programme can be downloaded below.
Please register at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-surrounding-forest-trees-in-the-medieval-imaginary-tickets-59037494736

For further information, see:
https://northernemics.wordpress.com/the-surrounding-forest-trees-in-the-medieval-imaginary/

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events/remote_event_view?id=5308

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Conference Masterclass: Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group

The Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group (PMRG) welcomes all who have an interest in the culture, life and history of medieval and early modern Europe. PMRG offers a forum to showcase local, national and international scholarship in the field by hosting seminar papers and presentations by local and visiting scholars throughout the year. The highlight of the year is the annual conference, attracting scholars of all stages from around the world to present their research. Themes in previous years have included such diverse areas as magic and marvels, houses, households and families and the world as stage.

To create more support for undergraduate and postgraduate students, PMRG member Laura Collier has developed a Conference/Abstract Masterclass to work in tandem with the Study Smarter Conference Workshop.

The Masterclass is designed to assist students with such things as crafting an abstract, sourcing CFPs, joining professional memberships, public speaking skills, and general conference information (such as what to wear, how to network and how to follow up on connections you’ve made once the conference in question is over).

What makes PMRG’s Masterclass unique is the opportunity for students to:

  • Present your abstract on the day, as though it were an actual paper being presented at a real conference.
  • Experience receiving questions during the question time following your paper (and also how to ask them!) and,
  • Have the unique opportunity to submit your abstract to the CFP for PMRG’s annual conference in October of this year, with a view that all students whose abstracts are within the realm of our conference’s topic, and who have attended our Masterclass, will be accepted to present. You will also then receive guidance on writing their paper between CFP acceptance and the conference itself.

The PMRG Masterclass will be held on Friday 5 April 2019, and will run from 9:00am to 1:00pm. The conference itself will be on Saturday 19 October, 2019, and will run for a full day. The theme for the conference is “Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern Worlds”.

The Masterclass is free for all to attend, however for catering purposes we are asking attendees to register by following this link: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/perth-medieval-and-renaissance-group-pmrg-masterclass-tickets-58963132316

For further information, please feel free to contact Masterclass organiser Laura Collier (laura.collier@research.uwa.edu.au).

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Call for contributors English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty

The editors of English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty – a four-volume series to be published in Palgrave Macmillan’s “Queenship and Power” series – are still seeking abstracts for a number of consorts. A revised Call for Contributors has been issued with a deadline of 1 May 2019.

English Consorts: Power, Influence, Dynasty aims to provide short, focused, well-researched, and refereed biographies of all of the English consorts since the Conquest. While the editors are keen to hear from prospective authors on any consort, they are especially looking for submissions on:

Norman to Early Plantagenet Consorts:
Margaret of France (wife of Henry the Young King)
Isabella of Gloucester (wife of King John)

Later Plantagenet and the Wars of the Roses Consorts:
Isabella de Valois

Tudor and Stuart Consorts:
Elizabeth of York
Katherine of Aragon
Elizabeth Cromwell and Dorothy Cromwell (a double-biography of the wives of the Lords Protectors Cromwell)

Hanoverian to Windsor Consorts:
Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
Caroline of Brunswick
Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother
Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh

The Editors are happy to field questions and queries and can be contacted at: englishconsorts@gmail.com

Full details are available at the project website: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/centrestaff/norrie-consorts

ANZAMEMS membership fees now due for 2019

Current and prospective members of ANZAMEMS are reminded that membership fees for 2019 are now due. New and renewing members are advised that you must be a financial member by 31 March 2019 in order to receive the upcoming issue of the Association’s journal Parergon (Issue 36.1) or vote in the elections to be held at the forthcoming AGM on 1 April. Those unable to attend the AGM need to return their proxy voting forms to the ANZAMEMS Secretary by 25 March.

Membership fees start at AUD$33 for concessional (student/unwaged/retired) and AUD$66 for full individual membership. Institutional subscriptions are also available. To join, please visit the ANZAMEMS website.

The benefits of membership include:

  • Subscription to Parergon — the latest research in medieval and early modern studies and reviews of recent books, published twice yearly (please note you will receive one hard copy of the journal only).
  • Opportunity to apply for a range of travel bursaries and publication prizes award by ANZAMEMS
  • Opportunity to review the latest academic titles for Parergon.
  • Inclusion on the ANZAMEMS mail-list — receive notifications of upcoming events and opportunities, be informed of the books available for review in Parergon.
  • Inclusion on the ANZAMEMS postgraduate and early career research social group on the social media platform Facebook.
  • Access to a dynamic and supportive international research network.

Roles for senior and early career MEMS scholars, Australian Catholic University

The Australian Catholic University in Melbourne is seeking further researchers (senior and early career) of outstanding potential and demonstrated achievement with expertise in medieval and early modern studies to join its recently established research program within ACU’s Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry. Please follow the following link for details:

https://careers.pageuppeople.com/456/caw/en/job/974909/research-fellowsenior-research-fellow-medieval-early-modern-studies

See also: https://www.acu.edu.au/research/our-research-institutes/institute-for-religion-and-critical-inquiry/our-programs/medieval-and-early-modern-studies

The work of applicants should encompass religion, broadly conceived, in the medieval and early modern periods. The recent round of appointments established strengths in late medieval and early modern Italy and the Low Countries, late medieval and early modern Central Europe, early modern France, the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman world, and the history of the papacy; the cultures of time, religious violence, theology and literature, women’s spirituality, popular religion, politics, and theology.

With this further round of appointments, the MEMS Program seeks scholars whose work will complement and expand these strengths. Applicants to the first round are welcome to re-apply.

To apply and for further information, see the ACU website. Applications close 16 April, 2019.

Australian Academy of the Humanities and The British Academy Knowledge Frontiers Forum

The British Academy and the Australian Academy of the Humanities are inviting applications for humanities, arts and social science Early Career Researchers (ECRs) to attend the Knowledge Frontiers Forum on the broad theme ‘The Future’ to take place Monday 11-Tuesday 12 November 2019 in Brisbane.

The Forum will bring together up to 40 ECRs (understood as up to seven years after obtaining a PhD) from the UK, Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific region to discuss key questions around the futures theme. This has been broadly envisaged, and areas of expected discussion include experiences of rapid social and cultural change, evolving notions of heritage, imaginations of the future, environmental futures, and co-designing and producing knowledge in the future. Recognising the contribution of Indigenous knowledge to discussions of the future, applications from Indigenous researchers working across these thematic areas are encouraged.

Travel and accommodation expenses will be met for successful applicants.

See the Australian Academy of the Humanities website for full details of the event and application process. Applications are due no later than 5:00pm GMT Wednesday 10 April 2019.

New Zealand and Pacific applicants:

The British Academy and Australian Academy of the Humanities have made places available for up to four New Zealanders and two Pacific Islands delegates, with Royal Society Te Apārangi providing travel grants of up to NZ$750 (up to $750 for ECR Forum Members and Pacific delegates, two-thirds of cost up to $500 for non-member New Zealand delegates). For further information, see the Royal Society of New Zealand website.

CFP International conference on music iconography

Paper proposals are invited for the International Conference of Association RIdIM 2019 on “Belonging and Detachment: Representing Musical Identity in Visual Culture”.
The conference will take place in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 13-15 November 2019.

Musicians and artists rarely operate in complete isolation. Throughout history they have negotiated power structures and geographical circumstances, and these factors remain influential in the digital age.

The 19th International Conference of Association RIdIM seeks to examine the ways in which musicians and artists experience ‘belonging’ and ‘detachment’ – be it socially, politically, geographically, artistically, aesthetically and/or philosophically. The primary concern of the conference is how such experiences impact upon the representation of musical identity in visual culture.

As the current global crisis of mass migration and displacement highlights many different experiences of belonging and detachment, Association RIdIM invites submissions on all aspects of this theme relating to the representation of musical identity in visual culture. It hopes to foster a dialogue between scholars and practitioners and calls for paper proposals from diverse participants including musicologists, art historians and theorists, curators, performers, composers and artists.

Topics related to the conference theme might include:

  • The Other and Otherness
  • Centre and Periphery
  • Migration, Displacement, Diaspora
  • Multiculturalism, Cultural Pluralism and Transculturalism
  • Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
  • Music, Class and Power
  • Networks and Patronage
  • Artistic Hierarchies
  • Curatorial Practice
  • Considerations on Music Iconography as a Discipline
  • Music, Art and Empathy

Proposals are welcomed from visual artists and musicians addressing the ways in which the conference theme is approached in their own work.

Deadline for abstract submission: 1 April 2019.
For further information, including details of conference awards, see the RIdIM website.

Registration open: Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference

Registration is now open for the 20th Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference, Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium.

Macquarie University, Sydney, July 19-21 2019
To register, go to: http://events.mq.edu.au/AABS20

Keynote speakers:

Professor David Olster (University of Kentucky)
“The Idolatry of the Jews and the Anti-Judaizing Roots of Seventh- and Early Eighth-Century Iconoclasm”

Associate Professor Jitse Dijkstra (University of Ottawa)
“The Avenging Sword? Imperial Legislation Against Temples in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries”

The Byzantine empire was rarely a stable and harmonious state during its long and eventful history. It was often in strife with those outside its borders and with those within them, and with so much power invested in its political and ecclesiastical structures it was ready to implode at times. This could result in persecution and the silencing of dissident voices from various quarters of society. The mechanisms by which the authorities controlled civil disorder and dissent, as well as discouraging criticism of imperial policies, could be brutal at times. In what sense was it possible, if at all, to enjoy freedom of speech and action in Byzantium? Was the law upheld or ignored when vested interests were at stake? How vulnerable did minorities feel and how conformist was religious belief at the end of the day? The theme of the conference aims to encourage discussion on a number fronts relating to the use and abuse of power within the history of Byzantium.